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NEWS
January 3, 1999 | BRAD CAIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
As he pulls himself along the edge of a coffee table and munches on a handful of goldfish crackers, Korben Baker looks like any rambunctious toddler. But the surgical scars that crisscross his belly and the feeding tube that sticks out of his stomach tell another story--of a little boy born with a heart defect who has already endured three major operations in less than two years.
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NATIONAL
February 1, 2004 | Tomas Alex Tizon, Times Staff Writer
In what is being portrayed as the latest test of antitax sentiment in the country, Oregon voters will decide Tuesday whether to accept an $800-million tax increase adopted by the Legislature to patch gaping holes in the state budget.
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NATIONAL
February 1, 2004 | Tomas Alex Tizon, Times Staff Writer
In what is being portrayed as the latest test of antitax sentiment in the country, Oregon voters will decide Tuesday whether to accept an $800-million tax increase adopted by the Legislature to patch gaping holes in the state budget.
NEWS
January 3, 1999 | BRAD CAIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
As he pulls himself along the edge of a coffee table and munches on a handful of goldfish crackers, Korben Baker looks like any rambunctious toddler. But the surgical scars that crisscross his belly and the feeding tube that sticks out of his stomach tell another story--of a little boy born with a heart defect who has already endured three major operations in less than two years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1992 | Washington Post
Oregon ranked 709 medical services, in a priority list, classifying them into 17 categories. Items in categories 1 through 9 were deemed "essential to basic care," items in categories 10 through 13 were "very important" and services in categories 14 through 17 were considered "valuable to individuals but of minimal gain and-or high cost." Oregon's 1991 budget for Medicaid funded most items on the priority list.
NATIONAL
September 10, 2006 | Lynn Marshall, Times Staff Writer
A grieving couple's attempts to memorialize their son, as well as other soldiers killed in Iraq and Afghanistan, has run into a thicket of criticism about the project's timing, aesthetics and politics. As Oregon prepares to begin construction of the Afghan-Iraqi Freedom Memorial here, some question whether it should be built while the fighting continues. Others find the memorial's scale daunting. And a panel of architects thinks it's ugly. The project is the brainchild of Clay and M.J.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2009 | Kim Murphy
This misty stretch of wide sand dunes, like much of the Oregon coast, has always had an intimate connection to the forest. The old lumber mill for years was the biggest employer in town, after the fishing fleets. So it was with "horrible" regret that Siuslaw School District Supt. George Winterscheid announced recently that to plug an unexpected budget shortfall, wood shop was being canceled.
NATIONAL
June 27, 2003 | Tomas Alex Tizon, Times Staff Writer
The fall from grace was dizzying and even, to some, cartoonish. For decades, Oregon's charms routinely won over the surveyors whose job was to rank places according to beauty, efficiency and livability. The state in recent years was hailed as the place "Where It Works" and its largest city, Portland, as one of the nation's best places to live. Oregon claimed similar honors in the early 1970s, about the time that a square-jawed young labor lawyer named Ted Kulongoski straggled into the state.
NEWS
August 23, 1995 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
While House Republicans are trying to convince the public that they can reduce growth in Medicare costs by $270 billion, key Senate leaders are conceding that the plan will never make it through the relevant Senate committees, the White House said Tuesday. Mike McCurry, President Clinton's press secretary, said that "just about everybody" agrees the House plan is doomed and "privately, it's what some of the Republican chairs of the relevant committees are telling us."
NEWS
May 8, 2005 | Julia Silverman, Associated Press Writer
One day after jazz band practice, 14-year-old Peter Wilson's band teacher pulled him aside for a chat. The instructor wanted to know whether Wilson, who is home-schooled alongside his three brothers, liked being taught by his mother, and why he didn't come to public school full-time instead of just for music programs. His teacher seemed uncomfortable, Wilson said, and the interview was brief. When he got home, the teenager told his parents what had happened.
NATIONAL
November 3, 2002 | Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writer
On a crisp fall morning, Dan Isaacson and Britt McEachern walk door to door in a neighborhood of tidy bungalows, eagerly selling their health insurance plan. They promise a health care paradise: no deductibles or co-payments, free prescription drugs, choice of any doctor, free mental health care, dental, vision and long-term care. "This is not an HMO," they tell anyone who will listen. "The only one who will say you can or can't have a procedure is your doctor." The catch?
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