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BUSINESS
July 3, 1987 | Associated Press
Mayor Clayton Wood keeps a watchful eye on this town's newest and most significant resident, a Japanese engineer who prefers steak to sushi and big Chevys to little Toyotas. For Wood, Kenji Saito is living proof that although the inhabitants of the local cemetery outnumber the 545 living residents of Millersburg, this tiny central Oregon town is far from dead. Saito's company, Nippon Kokan K.K.
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BUSINESS
July 3, 1987 | Associated Press
Mayor Clayton Wood keeps a watchful eye on this town's newest and most significant resident, a Japanese engineer who prefers steak to sushi and big Chevys to little Toyotas. For Wood, Kenji Saito is living proof that although the inhabitants of the local cemetery outnumber the 545 living residents of Millersburg, this tiny central Oregon town is far from dead. Saito's company, Nippon Kokan K.K.
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FOOD
April 28, 2012
The Willamette Valley, the historical heart of the Oregon wine industry, was once thought to be too cool for grape growing, and ever since those earliest days, its climate has been its defining feature — wines known for finesse, even when notions of finesse went underappreciated. But critical attitudes are moving away from the "bigger is better" mind set, and the last two vintages, 2010 and 2011, among the coolest climate years on record, are likely to yield some of the valley's most ethereal reds.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Politics makes strange bedfellows, especially in Hollywood. Case in point: A trade group representing the business interests of Oregon's major production companies has joined forces with local labor leaders -- to keep a local union office from closing. In a recent letter to SAG-AFTRA Executive Director David White, Tom McFadden, executive director of the Oregon Media Production Assn. urged White to reconsider closing its Oregon office, contending that doing so would put the state's film industry at a competitive disadvantage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1997 | SALLY CARPENTER HALE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tucked away among forested hillsides just beyond Portland's suburbia, Oregon wineries are beginning to get the world's attention. In the 35 years since the first growers to brave the Willamette Valley's mud discovered that it is an ideal place to grow pinot noir, about 120 wineries have set down roots. Last year, $90 million worth of Oregon wine was sold, as far away as Europe, Japan and Australia.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's new gasoline tax went into effect Wednesday with few apparent hitches, drawing resigned grumbles from motorists as nearly 12,000 service stations across the state began collecting an extra nickel for each gallon of gas they sell. Spot reports from service stations and dealer associations throughout Southern California and the rest of the state indicated that most motorists came prepared to pay more for gas when they pulled up to the pumps throughout the day Wednesday.
NEWS
March 12, 2002 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration announced an agreement Monday to withdraw "critical habitat" designations for 19 species of threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead in California, Oregon, Washington and Idaho. Builders said the administration's action would remove a significant deterrent to construction in many areas of the four states.
NEWS
April 25, 1997 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the most far-reaching decisions ever made under the controversial federal law protecting endangered species, the Clinton administration will declare the Northern California coho salmon a creature threatened with extinction, administration officials said Thursday.
NEWS
May 19, 2001 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration has delayed indefinitely the release of a management plan for the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in southern Oregon--a move that could have consequences for more than 3 million acres of wild lands set aside for such protection nationwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1994 | ELAINE DUTKA and ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Though Hollywood and Republicans have never been comfortable bedfellows, few in the film business expect that the GOP landslide Tuesday will create negative ripples on the movie-making front. Family values and excessive violence--on the streets and on the screen--may be dominating the national debate, industry insiders say, but--as the popularity of "Natural Born Killers" and "Pulp Fiction" point out--politics and entertainment are two different realms.
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