Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOregon Shakespeare Festival
IN THE NEWS

Oregon Shakespeare Festival

FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
August 3, 2013 | By Ryan Ritchie
There's no way to describe Ashland, Ore., as anything but quaint. Whether you're browsing knickknacks in Renaissance Rose, combing through an extensive John Steinbeck collection at Shakespeare Books & Antiques, sipping on freshly squeezed apple juice from the Ashland Food Co-op or standing 10 feet from a deer on Hargadine Street, this town of about 20,000 is inviting, charming and, well, quaint. The tab: Three nights in suite R at Grape Street Gardens runs $240 (prices are prorated if guests stay weekly or monthly)
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2014 | Chris Lee
James Avery, who portrayed the commanding yet cuddly father figure on the hit 1990s sitcom "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air," died at a Glendale hospital Tuesday of complications from open heart surgery. He was 65. His death was confirmed by his manager, Toni Benson. Although trained as a Shakespearean actor, Avery won his widest audience in the role of Judge Philip Banks - "Uncle Phil" - on "Fresh Prince," which aired on NBC from 1990 to 1996. Ranked No. 34 on TV Guide's 50 Greatest TV Dads of All Time, the Navy veteran's stern, straight-arrow character provided a foil for series star Will Smith, who played the wise-cracking teenage nephew from the mean streets of west Philadelphia who moved into Uncle Phil's uptight Bel-Air household.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2004 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Jerry Turner, who helped transform the Oregon Shakespeare Festival from a summer program for semi-professional actors into one of the top regional theaters in the country, has died. He was 76. Turner died of heart failure Sept. 2 at his home in Olympia, Wash., said Eddie Wallace, a festival official.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2013 | By David Ng
Bryan Cranston, who recently completed his run in the AMC drama series "Breaking Bad," will be taking his current stage role as President Lyndon Johnson to New York. The actor will appear in "All the Way," by Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Robert Schenkkan, on Broadway later this season, but no opening date has been released. Producer Jeffrey Richards made the announcement on Sunday. (Schenkkan had broken the news earlier via social media.) Cranston has been appearing in "All the Way" at the American Repertory Theatre in Cambridge, Mass., where the sold-out run is set to close on Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2009 | HECTOR TOBAR
Armando Duran has the gritty look of a Mexican campesino, a man of the soil who squints up at the clouds and wonders if it will rain. You could also say he has the hardened stare of a street tough who earns his living in the illicit trades of a violent world. Or, at least, that's the way Hollywood casting agents saw him. In L.A., "I was getting work, but I was always playing bank robbers or a Cuban hit man or a Colombian drug lord," said Duran, a 50-year-old native of Southern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | JOHN BOUDREAU
At this year's Oregon Shakespeare Festival in this bucolic town, amid performances of "Comedy of Errors" and "Henry V," theatergoers are being unnerved by a distressing play about the rise of neo-Nazism in the Pacific Northwest. Steven Dietz's "God's Country"--a mix of surrealism and headline news--is a fistful of hate made in the U.S.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1992 | JOHN BOUDREAU, John Boudreau is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
With a regal sweep of his hand, Henry Woronicz shows off the new addition to his kingdom, a $7.5-million extension to the Oregon Shakespeare Festival's outdoor Tudor Theater. Sharp sounds of saws and hammers sing out in the acoustical shell--where the Bard's verse can now be spoken, not shouted--as craftsmen complete finishing touches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1995 | JEFF BARNARD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Outside the Oregon Shakespeare Festival's Elizabethan Theater, dancers and musicians warm up the audience with a comical sword fight in which weapons are loaves of bread, a turkey leg and a zucchini. Within the walls of the outdoor theater, it's fight call. Actors in the evening performance of "Macbeth" warm up with the real thing: heavy blades of steel forged in India that easily would draw blood if every cut and parry weren't carefully choreographed.
TRAVEL
July 13, 1997 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
Behold the town a dead bard's plots sustain, Where stage and stores his words doth decorate, Where green hills rise and sweet creek swiftly runs, And far-flung strangers do yearly subscribe, To gaze on spawn of two clans strangely wed, And wonder: How hath Hamlet fathered hamlet? The town is Ashland, perched on the edge of the Rogue River Valley opposite a gorgeous verdant hillside, roughly midway between San Francisco and Portland.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1991
Jess Bravin's article "Shylock: The Stereotype Is Still a Problem" (June 5) revealed the vexation caused by the anti-Semitism contained in Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice." Staging this production in today's costumes, as is being done by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and the Old Globe Theatre of San Diego, is a step toward increasing anti-Semitism within our own times, as if there were a lack of it. By bringing this 400-year-old play into modern times, the producers and directors imply that today's Jews are like Shylock and that any punishment is justified.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Gabriel García Márquez's “One Hundred Years of Solitude,” first published in 1967, is a novel set in a bygone era of Colombian history without much technology to speak of. Now the book itself is finally starting to enter the digital age. “One Hundred Years of Solitude” is not yet available as an e-book. But now you can travel to the fictional Macondo in an audio book, from Blackstone Audio. The Ashland, Ore.-based company has acquired the unabridged audio rights to four works by García Márquez: “One Hundred Years of Solitude,” English translation by Gregory Rabassa; “Love in the Time of Cholera,” translated by Edith Grossman; “No One Writes to the Colonel,” translated by J. S. Bernstein; and “Memories of My Melancholy Whores,” also translated by Edith Grossman.
TRAVEL
August 3, 2013 | By Ryan Ritchie
There's no way to describe Ashland, Ore., as anything but quaint. Whether you're browsing knickknacks in Renaissance Rose, combing through an extensive John Steinbeck collection at Shakespeare Books & Antiques, sipping on freshly squeezed apple juice from the Ashland Food Co-op or standing 10 feet from a deer on Hargadine Street, this town of about 20,000 is inviting, charming and, well, quaint. The tab: Three nights in suite R at Grape Street Gardens runs $240 (prices are prorated if guests stay weekly or monthly)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2013 | By David Ng
Bryan Cranston is going from playing a meth dealer on AMC's "Breaking Bad" to playing President Lyndon B. Johnson in a new stage production of a work by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Robert Schenkkan. "All The Way" will open the new season at American Repertory Theater in Massachusetts, with performances scheduled to begin Sept. 13. The company said that the play dramatizes Johnson's first year in the Oval Office as he deals with the conflict in Vietnam and civil-rights unrest at home.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2012 | By David Ng
Today is the 448th birthday of William Shakespeare -- that is, if you believe the widely held assumption that the Bard was born on April 23. Like many things involving the greatest playwright in the English language, the day of his birth is shrouded in mystery. Shakespeare is believed to have been born on this day in 1564 but there is no official record that confirms it. The future writer was baptized on April 26 and it was customary at the time for infants to be baptized three days after birth.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Richard Montoya says he's "obsessed with the night" and the history-making players that go bump in it. Fugitive slaves on the Underground Railroad . Mexican immigrants wading across the Rio Grande. Radical labor organizers and hard-line Arizona sheriffs. Lewis and Clark and Jackie Robinson, Sacagawea and Joan Baez, Fidel Castro and Malcolm X. While a few of these nocturnal convergences are historical facts, others are simply dramatic metaphors and theatrical phantasms.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2009 | Mike Boehm
The Geffen Playhouse has picked "Equivocation," by Bill Cain, a Jesuit priest-cum-playwright, to fill the remaining slot in its 2009-10 season. It's a piece of speculative historical fiction, set in London of 1606, with a complicated premise involving a foiled plot to blow up King James and Parliament. Cain is on the theatrical comeback trail after having scored a lone hit 20 years ago at the Mark Taper Forum with "Stand-Up Tragedy." "Equivocation" will have its world premiere April 15 at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2009 | HECTOR TOBAR
Armando Duran has the gritty look of a Mexican campesino, a man of the soil who squints up at the clouds and wonders if it will rain. You could also say he has the hardened stare of a street tough who earns his living in the illicit trades of a violent world. Or, at least, that's the way Hollywood casting agents saw him. In L.A., "I was getting work, but I was always playing bank robbers or a Cuban hit man or a Colombian drug lord," said Duran, a 50-year-old native of Southern California.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|