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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1996 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
History is told by the victors, but the interesting sea change in current American history-telling is that the vanquished are now allowed to speak. Traditionalists don't like this: Remember the firestorm of protest over the Smithsonian's recent Hiroshima exhibit, which U.S. veterans decried for suggesting that maybe, just maybe, the U.S. did a very bad thing dropping the atom bomb?
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NEWS
August 22, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Covered bridges in Oregon? Lane County in the Willamette Valley claims to have more intact covered bridges than anywhere else west of the Mississippi River. Cyclists who follow an easy 38-mile bike course will see the bridges as well as small towns and Dorena Lake at the foot of the Cascade Mountains.  The deal: The route is one of nine Scenic Bikeway Itineraries featured on a free map for travelers intent on seeing the state from the seat of a bicycle. Longer routes in the eastern part of the state include the Grande Tour Scenic Bikeway , a 134-mile route along some sections of the original Oregon Trail, and the Old West Scenic Bikeway , which covers 175 miles through ponderosa pine forests and along rivers.
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SPORTS
November 23, 2009 | Chris Dufresne
Time ran out on Arizona against Oregon but also on a columnist trying to chronicle the year's best game (so far) as Saturday night sprinted toward a Sunday newspaper deadline. Call this the "Extra, extra, read all about it!" spillover edition. Oregon's 44-41 double-overtime victory in Tucson was remarkable on many offensive and defensive fronts. Let's start with Oregon holder Nate Costa, the backup quarterback, whose hands should be cast and bronzed for posterity should the Ducks go on to win the Rose Bowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Indie director Kelly Reichardt always brings an artistic eye to her films, though never more so than in the minimalist beauty and stark realism of "Meek's Cutoff. " Hers is an unforgiving Old West pared to the bone — a lyrical poem for some, like watching paint dry for others. I'd argue for embracing the poetic, a rare commodity in American films these days. Set on the Oregon Trail, circa 1845, it is a story of hardships, hopes and the road not taken as three pioneering families hitch their future to a mountain man promising a shortcut over the Cascade Mountains.
NEWS
April 26, 1993 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's time to reflect on the roots of our rootlessness. The Oregon Trail is 150 years old this spring. Two thousand miles long, passing through six states and across any number of American Indian nations, from prairie camps in Independence, Mo., westward over tough, dusty, dangerous, river-strewn countryside to Oregon City, now a Portland suburb, the Oregon Trail was the first great highway to contemporary California.
SPORTS
January 7, 2007 | Bill Plaschke
With about a minute left in the madness that swallowed the nation's No. 1-ranked team here Saturday, the roaring and stomping crowd was suddenly drowned out. What could be louder? It was a fire alarm. It began buzzing and whooping and sending chills through the 9,000 who had squeezed into this eight-decades-old piece of kindling known as McArthur Court. But none of the Oregon fans left. None of them even moved. It was as if everyone knew. This was going to be UCLA's day to evacuate.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2009 | ANN POWERS, POP MUSIC CRITIC
"We don't use the word 'grande' here," said the barista at Albina Press, one of the latte-obsessed Pacific Northwest's many shrines to the perfectly pulled cup. "That's a proprietary term of the Starbucks company. Do you mean 'large'?" While I tried to sweet-talk my way out of a bitter drink, Matt Ward, who'd suggested we meet here, scanned the coffeehouse for a table. Every spot in the large, airy room was taken by someone hunched over a laptop or a book. This cross section of students, unidentified "creatives" and home-office refugees would not tolerate the noise of a journalist quizzing a musician.
BOOKS
December 19, 2004 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to Book Review, is the author of, most recently, "God Against the Gods: The History of the War Between Monotheism and Polytheism."
At least two notions have become attached to the Oregon Trail, the main route for pioneers crossing the frontier between the 1840s and the 1860s, and both are debunked in David Dary's compelling account of the first great road west. It was no mere trail. From its discovery in the early 1800s until the coming of the railroad in 1869, it would carry more than a quarter-million men, women and children to new homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2002 | AMALIE YOUNG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wagons carved such deep ruts in some dusty hills on the Oregon Trail in the mid-19th century that nothing will grow there yet. The parallel path of the wheels stretch for miles in those spots. From a crossing at the Snake River, visitors can follow parts of the route taken by more than 300,000 homesteaders and adventure-seekers as they pressed north toward the Columbia River into what is now Oregon, then west to their Eden--the lush Willamette Valley.
TRAVEL
July 18, 1993 | EILEEN OGINTZ
The covered wagon bumped and creaked and swayed its way slowly across the prairie to Chimney Rock: 1 1/2 hours to travel fewer than three miles to the famed pioneer landmark. "I could ride my bike faster than this," 7-year-old Regina offered. The wagon stopped at the base of the odd-shaped clay spire--a natural formation standing nearly 500 feet high--and the kids clambered up the crumbling rock.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
After a hand-stitched title card announces the year and place as 1845 Oregon, "Meek's Cutoff" shows the slow, laborious process of a small wagon train moving across open country. A river is crossed, water gathered, clothes wrung out, cookware scrubbed. Then, as one shot dissolves slowly into another, one barren landscape fading in from the last, the wagons and their guide seem to roll right across an expanse of open sky, an image at once rustic, fragile and mystical. "Meek's Cutoff" is by all technical definitions a western but also clearly something more.
SPORTS
January 2, 2010 | By Gary Klein
Oregon's season started with a loss that was punctuated by running back LeGarrette Blount's infamous postgame punch. It ended Friday in the 96th Rose Bowl with the Ducks' usually high-powered offense made punchless by Ohio State. Blount, once again, played a pivotal role in the Ducks' 26-17 defeat. The senior from Florida, who was suspended after his Sept. 3 postgame outburst at Boise State, scored the Ducks' first touchdown. But his third-quarter fumble deep in Ohio State territory ended a scoring opportunity with Oregon trailing by two points.
SPORTS
November 23, 2009 | Chris Dufresne
Time ran out on Arizona against Oregon but also on a columnist trying to chronicle the year's best game (so far) as Saturday night sprinted toward a Sunday newspaper deadline. Call this the "Extra, extra, read all about it!" spillover edition. Oregon's 44-41 double-overtime victory in Tucson was remarkable on many offensive and defensive fronts. Let's start with Oregon holder Nate Costa, the backup quarterback, whose hands should be cast and bronzed for posterity should the Ducks go on to win the Rose Bowl.
SPORTS
October 26, 2009 | Gary Klein
Before the season, USC's game at Oregon on Saturday looked like it could be the matchup of the year in the Pacific 10 Conference. The luster faded when Oregon lost its season opener to Boise State. It all but disappeared after USC fell at Washington on Sept. 19. Six weeks later, the Trojans and Ducks are back in the national spotlight with a marquee matchup that will have Pac-10 title implications and possibly more. Oregon (6-1) leads the Pac-10 with a 4-0 record. USC (6-1)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2009 | ANN POWERS, POP MUSIC CRITIC
"We don't use the word 'grande' here," said the barista at Albina Press, one of the latte-obsessed Pacific Northwest's many shrines to the perfectly pulled cup. "That's a proprietary term of the Starbucks company. Do you mean 'large'?" While I tried to sweet-talk my way out of a bitter drink, Matt Ward, who'd suggested we meet here, scanned the coffeehouse for a table. Every spot in the large, airy room was taken by someone hunched over a laptop or a book. This cross section of students, unidentified "creatives" and home-office refugees would not tolerate the noise of a journalist quizzing a musician.
SPORTS
November 30, 2008 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, Dufresne is a Times staff writer.
The day was crisp and clear with a kickoff temperature of 62 degrees. Sunset left a stunning pink hue that clung to the hills that surround Reser Stadium. It almost felt like Pasadena on Jan. 1 What a backdrop. What a tease. What a Beaver bummer. Roses being housed in an adjacent building, guarded by a SWAT officer, were never threatened or presented. There wasn't much to say up here after Oregon crushed Oregon State in the 112th Civil War, 65-38. Beavers tried to make their mouths move.
NEWS
November 22, 2001 | JINNY GUDMUNDSEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Simulations are terrific for educating kids. By creating complex environments, simulations let kids learn by doing. Two new titles, "Oregon Trail 5th Edition: Adventures Along the Oregon Trail" and "Monopoly Tycoon," show how good a good simulation can be. "The Oregon Trail 5th Edition: Adventures Along the Oregon Trail": Become a pioneer, join a wagon train and head west on the Oregon Trail to make a fortune. Kids do that and more in this fifth installment of the classic "Oregon Trail" series.
TRAVEL
June 27, 1993 | JAMES T. YENCKEL, WASHINGTON POST
The grass-covered slope of Windlass Hill rises from the empty vastness of the Nebraska prairie, still branded by the tracks carved as the pioneers inched their covered wagons down the incline. The ruts are so deep they have survived a century and a half of wind, rain and snow. This hill was among the first of countless obstacles that challenged the thousands of pioneers headed west on the 2,170-mile Oregon Trail.
TRAVEL
October 5, 2008 | Patrick Comiskey, Special to The Times
Most wine regions are beautiful, but Oregon's Willamette Valley is exceptional. Dramatically situated between two mountain ranges, the Coast Range to the west and the Cascades to the east, the valley is a lush rural area, gently curvaceous landscape shaped by volcanic events, then polished by abundant Pacific moisture. The result is a sensuous terrain of smooth-shouldered, voluptuous hills and languorous green valleys lined with fragrant forests of spruce, fir and pine.
SPORTS
January 7, 2007 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
So unused to losing basketball games are the UCLA Bruins that junior leader Arron Afflalo stood in a cold corridor at McArthur Court shivering under one towel and wiping his eyes with another. Not that it was realistic to expect the top-ranked Bruins to run through an undefeated season, but this first loss, a Pacific 10 Conference road game in the head-splittingly loud arena, hit Afflalo with an unexpected melancholy. The Bruins (14-1, 3-1) were beaten, 68-66, by No.
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