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Organic Food

BUSINESS
October 17, 1997 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Diego purveyor of "organic" olives and olive oil has been accused by state regulators of false advertising and of misbranding products, highlighting the sometimes dubious--and lucrative--claims made by firms seeking to exploit the popularity of organic food. The California Department of Health Services said this week it has found evidence of 26 violations of the 1990 state Organic Foods Act by Petrou Foods Inc. Each violation carries a potential fine of $1,000.
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NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Karin Klein
It's good news that General Mills has decided not to include genetically engineered ingredients in Cheerios. Not because crops whose DNA has been tinkered with in a laboratory are dangerous to human health. There's still a dearth of evidence that they are. But plenty of consumers don't like them and outright fear them. (By the way, a New York Times article published Sunday does an excellent job of examining the claims and facts about bioengineered food, in a thorough and balanced way, by following a Hawaii councilman's journey to learn as much of the truth as he can about such food before voting on the topic.)
WORLD
September 16, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
At a glance, it is clear this is no run-of-the-mill farm: A 6-foot spiked fence hems the meticulously planted vegetables and security guards control a cantilevered gate that glides open only to select cars. "It is for officials only. They produce organic vegetables, peppers, onions, beans, cauliflowers, but they don't sell to the public," said Li Xiuqin, 68, a lifelong Shunyi village resident who lives directly across the street from the farm but has never been inside. "Ordinary people can't go in there.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2013 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
As a doctor, Jonathan Tam has a message for San Gabriel Valley residents: Eat your vegetables. Farm Cuisine, his new organic restaurant in Monterey Park, is trying to get cost-conscious Chinese diners to buy healthful organic takes on traditional Chinese dishes. But the pricier meals are a tough sell in the heavily Asian American valley, where more than 500 Chinese restaurants are in a pitched battle to offer authentic dishes at ever lower prices. JOIN A LIVE DISCUSSION AT 4 P.M. PT Area restaurants wear B and C food-safety grades like badges of honor, and diners line up for cheap fried pork dumplings and dim sum at $2 a plate.
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By Ted Rall
Under a bill approved by the California Legislature and sent to Gov. Jerry Brown, landlords who allow pets in their buildings cannot advertise in a way that discourages cats with claws or dogs that bark. ALSO: The case for organic food Photo gallery: Ted Rall cartoons McManus: Can Obama energize youthful voters again? Follow Ted Rall on Twitter @TedRall
BUSINESS
August 1, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A federal judge Tuesday questioned a central part of Whole Foods Market Inc.'s argument that it should be permitted to buy rival Wild Oats Markets Inc. The Federal Trade Commission has filed suit in federal court to block the $585-million deal, claiming that the two companies compete in a specific market of natural and organic food and that their combination will lead to reduced service and increased prices. David T.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Craig McNamara is a sustainable farming expert, organic walnut farmer in the Sacramento Valley town of Winters, founder of the nonprofit Center for Land-Based Learning and the California Farm Academy, and president of the state Board of Food and Agriculture, which advises state officials on farming policies. Organic food basket: At his Sierra Orchards, Craig McNamara makes extensive use of pro-environment and conservation techniques as he grows 450 acres of organic walnuts, presses organic olive oil from 150 trees that are more than a century old and helps his son raise hops for a local craft beer.
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | By Karin Klein
I've never met anyone who buys organic food to get more vitamins and minerals, so it's unclear why the public has been treated to a series of studies -- most recently a meta-review out of Stanford University -- telling us that for the most part organics don't have more vitamins and minerals. As a Times editorial pointed out last week, consumers buy organic to avoid ingesting common agricultural chemicals and to prevent those chemicals from harming the environment. Pesticide levels in organic food were found to be significantly lower.
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