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Organic Food

BUSINESS
October 17, 1997 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Diego purveyor of "organic" olives and olive oil has been accused by state regulators of false advertising and of misbranding products, highlighting the sometimes dubious--and lucrative--claims made by firms seeking to exploit the popularity of organic food. The California Department of Health Services said this week it has found evidence of 26 violations of the 1990 state Organic Foods Act by Petrou Foods Inc. Each violation carries a potential fine of $1,000.
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WORLD
September 16, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
At a glance, it is clear this is no run-of-the-mill farm: A 6-foot spiked fence hems the meticulously planted vegetables and security guards control a cantilevered gate that glides open only to select cars. "It is for officials only. They produce organic vegetables, peppers, onions, beans, cauliflowers, but they don't sell to the public," said Li Xiuqin, 68, a lifelong Shunyi village resident who lives directly across the street from the farm but has never been inside. "Ordinary people can't go in there.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2013 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
As a doctor, Jonathan Tam has a message for San Gabriel Valley residents: Eat your vegetables. Farm Cuisine, his new organic restaurant in Monterey Park, is trying to get cost-conscious Chinese diners to buy healthful organic takes on traditional Chinese dishes. But the pricier meals are a tough sell in the heavily Asian American valley, where more than 500 Chinese restaurants are in a pitched battle to offer authentic dishes at ever lower prices. JOIN A LIVE DISCUSSION AT 4 P.M. PT Area restaurants wear B and C food-safety grades like badges of honor, and diners line up for cheap fried pork dumplings and dim sum at $2 a plate.
OPINION
May 24, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The movement to force the labeling of genetically engineered food is gaining momentum. In November 2012, an initiative to require the labels in California was on the ballot; it was defeated. Now, federal legislation carried by Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) would mandate labeling most bioengineered food nationwide. Yet the movement's argument is weakened by the lack of evidence that inserting fragments of DNA into crops harms our health. Pro-labeling activists - who also tend to be anti-Monsanto activists - point to polls finding that most Americans want the information labeled.
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Karin Klein
It's good news that General Mills has decided not to include genetically engineered ingredients in Cheerios. Not because crops whose DNA has been tinkered with in a laboratory are dangerous to human health. There's still a dearth of evidence that they are. But plenty of consumers don't like them and outright fear them. (By the way, a New York Times article published Sunday does an excellent job of examining the claims and facts about bioengineered food, in a thorough and balanced way, by following a Hawaii councilman's journey to learn as much of the truth as he can about such food before voting on the topic.)
HEALTH
September 6, 2004 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
These are good times for those who grow and sell organic foods. But there may be trouble in paradise. Prompted by a quest for safer, healthier diets and a cleaner environment, more American consumers are buying the bountiful harvests of organic farmers. Last year, U.S. spending on organic foods reached close to $10.4 billion, making this the fastest-growing segment of the American food industry.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Campbell Soup Co., maker of canned soups and packaged cookies, is moving in a fresher and more healthful direction with its $1.55-billion purchase of Bakersfield, Calif.-based Bolthouse Farms. Now approaching its 100th anniversary, Bolthouse was among the first to sell baby carrots and is also known for its refrigerated salad dressings and so-called super-premium juices. The operation sells products under the Bolthouse Farms, Earthbound Farms and Green Giant brands and in the most recent fiscal year brought in sales of $689 million.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A federal judge Tuesday questioned a central part of Whole Foods Market Inc.'s argument that it should be permitted to buy rival Wild Oats Markets Inc. The Federal Trade Commission has filed suit in federal court to block the $585-million deal, claiming that the two companies compete in a specific market of natural and organic food and that their combination will lead to reduced service and increased prices. David T.
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By Ted Rall
Under a bill approved by the California Legislature and sent to Gov. Jerry Brown, landlords who allow pets in their buildings cannot advertise in a way that discourages cats with claws or dogs that bark. ALSO: The case for organic food Photo gallery: Ted Rall cartoons McManus: Can Obama energize youthful voters again? Follow Ted Rall on Twitter @TedRall
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2013 | By Titania Kumeh
Karen Segura dug her hands deep into the soil of an onion patch at Bell Gardens Intermediate School as cars zipped past the nearly empty schoolyard. The 14-year-old was busy uprooting weeds in the school's edible garden, while around her five other students watered, tilled and pruned a lush assortment of fruits and vegetables. There were tomatoes, avocados, apples, pineapples, pumpkins, zucchinis, lavender, lettuce, Swiss chard and artichokes. Every public school in Bell Gardens has just such an urban farm run by members of the Environmental Garden Club, an after-school program that started at the intermediate school and now includes a rotating roster of 8- to 18-year-olds.
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