Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOrganic Gardening
IN THE NEWS

Organic Gardening

NEWS
January 5, 1995 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Families that have experienced the malathion spraying in west Ventura County should "wash the environment in the back yard before they let out the pet turtle or uncover the goldfish pond," said organic gardening expert Andy Lopez. "Then your job is to get the normal back yard creatures to move back so nature can do her thing." Lopez is part of a nationwide movement promoting back yards as wildlife habitats--even sites for what has been called a "back yard safari."
Advertisement
REAL ESTATE
December 4, 1994 | JACK E. CHRISTENSEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
QUESTION: I hate to use chemical sprays in my garden, because I fear they may kill birds or other good creatures or damage the environment. Can you at least mention organic alternatives? ANSWER: I resort to sprays in my garden only when it is absolutely necessary, and that amounts to about once or twice a year. At times I've tried various concoctions recommended by organic gardening enthusiasts, but I must admit my success rate is rather low with them.
NEWS
December 1, 1994 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Are you on the lookout for some gardening and landscaping tips for the holidays? Nature has decreed that this is the season to be sowing seeds, planting bulbs and fertilizing your lawn. Even if the custom in the "old country"--those colder states--decrees that it's time to be sitting around the hearth or TV set, in Southern California it's time to get into the sunshine and do something else.
HOME & GARDEN
November 19, 1994 | JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Growing things without using synthetic fertilizers or insecticides is gaining new attention, but it is a very old concept. In the years before chemicals were introduced, there was no way to garden but organically. "It's ridiculous to say that crops won't thrive without chemicals," said Mike McGrath, editor in chief of Organic Gardening magazine. "True gardening is growing without the use of chemicals. People who go out and soak the garden with chemicals aren't gardeners, they're mad scientists."
HOME & GARDEN
November 19, 1994
1. Most insects are bad news and should be eliminated from the garden in order to preserve plant health. 2. Organic gardening can be less expensive than going the chemical route. 3. When a food package reads "certified organically grown," you can be assured that the food was grown organically. 4. Organic pesticides are all natural and therefore nontoxic and completely safe. 5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1994 | RAY PATTERSON
Vegetables are those ubiquitous objects that conjure up a wide variety of thoughts and emotions--from the dread of children to adults' hope for a fountain of youth or a cure for their ailments. They have been a motivation for genetic research and a boon to the petrochemical industry. They are the inspiration of cartoon characters such as Popeye.
NEWS
May 13, 1994 | CONNIE KOENENN
Kenny Ausubel wants to revolutionize the way we think about food, and he's starting with the country's 100 million back-yard gardeners. He wants them to plant organic seeds and suggests green Hubbard squash, red Wethersfield onions, Osaka purple mustard greens and early moonbeam watermelons. In 1989, the writer, filmmaker and environmental entrepreneur founded Seeds of Change, the first company to sell organic seeds nationally.
FOOD
July 8, 1993 | SYLVIA THOMPSON
These days, no matter where you live, it's rare that you can draw breath or take a sip or a bite without ingesting some chemical you wish weren't going into your body. My feeling is that so much that's harmful is being forced upon us unwittingly, we'd be fools to knowingly add more to the food we grow. That's why I began gardening organically--that is, without chemicals--out of self-defense. Slow and steady wins the day with an organic garden, but be prepared to work hard.
FOOD
May 6, 1993 | SYLVIA THOMPSON
Is there anything to eat that won't grow in Southern California? There are so many microclimates--cool winters, warm winters, subtropical belts, moist coasts, dry mountains--it's a rare plant that won't flourish here somewhere. My mouth waters at the prospect of the range of vegetables, herbs, fruits and edible flowers. Then how to choose? My feeling is that, after freshness and purity (I'm an organic gardener), the reason for growing one's own food is to taste the unusual.
NEWS
April 25, 1993 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ
The small plot of land that abuts the parking lot at the Watts Towers Art Center looks like an ordinary garden, but for about two dozen students the Metamorphosis Organic Garden is a chance at a job. "It's pretty cool," said Alex Burgara, a student at John Hope Continuation School in Watts, during a ground-blessing ceremony at the garden last week. "I don't want to gangbang and I like gardening, and I'm learning something."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|