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BUSINESS
September 15, 1999 | Stephen Gregory
Tortilla production is considered the fastest-growing segment of the baking industry, and more than 75 vendors of equipment and services used to make tortillas are expected to participate in the 10th annual Tortilla Industry Assn. convention beginning today in Anaheim. Along with a trade expo, the two-day gathering will feature discussions and seminars on business certification, organic products, Internet markets, waste-water disposal and product marketing. The Tortilla Industry Assn.
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BUSINESS
January 5, 2001 | Reuters
Dole Foods Co., the world's largest producer of fresh fruit and vegetables, said it will begin selling organic bananas under the Dole name, tapping into the $6-billion organic products market. The bananas will be grown in Ecuador and Honduras on farms that have been certified as organic by U.S.-based agencies, Dole said. The company will begin selling organic bananas Feb. 1. Rival Chiquita Brands International Inc. has no current plans to sell organic bananas under its label, a spokeswoman said.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1993
Deutrel Laboratories Inc., a Palmdale maker of fertilizers and other agricultural compounds, said it agreed to sell its organic-fertilizer manufacturing subsidiary to a British investor for cash and stock options. Deutrel did not release the name of the investor or terms of the agreement. But Deutrel said the sale of its subsidiary, Revive Organic Products Co., will provide about $500,000 in cash to Deutrel Laboratories, enabling it to expand its research and move to a larger facility.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1999 | Stephen Gregory
Tortilla production is considered the fastest-growing segment of the baking industry, and more than 75 vendors of equipment and services used to make tortillas are expected to participate in the 10th annual Tortilla Industry Assn. convention this week in Anaheim. Along with a trade expo, the two-day gathering beginning Wednesday at the Disneyland Hotel will feature discussions and seminars on business certification, organic products, Internet markets, waste-water disposal and product marketing.
IMAGE
January 9, 2011 | By Alexandra Drosu, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The beauty industry is no stranger to organic ingredients, and a multitude of hair- and skin-care companies claim to be eco-friendly, all-natural or certified organic. More recently, hair color companies have joined the eco-revolution, advertising nontoxic, ammonia-free, all-natural or organic formulas. But can hair color truly be green and effective? The debate over the dangers of hair color has percolated in the United States for more than 50 years, with studies both supporting and refuting the notion that hair dyes cause cancer.
MAGAZINE
October 14, 1990 | JANEY MILSTEAD
SIMPLY PURE FOODS baby products are so pure that tiny diners can eat everything but the container (even the label is nontoxic). And the wide-mouth, screw-top glass jar is definitely a plus for mommies and daddies. Simply Pure Foods, headquartered in Bangor, Me., is heading into its fourth year, not coincidentally, the same age as founder Sarah Redfield's son, Alexander. Redfield, a Harvard Law School graduate, had become concerned that youngsters under 5 are at high risk from pesticide residues.
NEWS
March 11, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
ANAHEIM -- Baby food is no longer just mushy, creamy, bland stuff in little jars. That couldn't be more apparent at the Natural Products Expo. Manufacturers are now promoting baby food enhanced with probiotics, vitamins and minerals and "hidden" vegetables. One maker of premier, healthy baby foods -- Happy Baby -- has grown from being in five stores three years ago to 5,000 today. Gerber, that old standby, has a line of certified-organic products such as organic brown rice.
HEALTH
September 4, 2000 | Phil Lempert
Are organic food products really better? That question was at the heart of a controversy involving ABC News "20/20" correspondent John Stossel, who last month issued an embarrassing on-air apology for inaccuracies in a Feb. 4 report that questioned the safety of organic food. Stossel conceded that contrary to his report, ABC had no evidence that organic produce was unsafe. In fact, he said, organics are "remarkably safe"--and just as safe as conventional produce.
OPINION
June 14, 2007
HOW DOES A retailer that controls about 10% of a market and is competing with much larger players become a monopolistic threat? That's a question the Federal Trade Commission needs to answer before it blocks the proposed merger of Whole Foods Market and the struggling Wild Oats Markets natural foods chain. The FTC warns that the deal, which aims to create a company with sales of $6.8 billion a year, would "tend to create a monopoly in the operation of premium natural and organic supermarkets."
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