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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Wilbur Snapp, 83, the only baseball park organist ever officially ousted from a game by an umpire, died Saturday of natural causes in a South Pasadena, Fla., hospital. Snapp, a World War II veteran who couldn't read music, taught himself to play the organ when he ran a music store in Springfield, Ohio. When he retired in 1982, he moved to Florida and played the organ at Jack Russell Stadium in Clearwater for the major leagues' spring training and during the summer for minor league teams.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Gordon Kibbee, 89, a pipe organist who recorded for motion pictures, radio and television, died Wednesday of natural causes at his Encino home. Renowned among his peers, Kibbee was among the 31 people who gathered in Toluca Lake on Feb. 8, 1955, to found the American Assn. of Theatre Organ Enthusiasts. He remained active in the group, now known as the American Theatre Organ Society, and was a popular organist for meetings across the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
Organist Frederick Swann will join the New West Symphony for two performances. Swann's career spans 60 years with Riverside Church in New York City, the Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove and First Congregational Church of Los Angeles. This will be his first appearance with the New West Symphony and his only appearance with a Southern California orchestra in his farewell season. The concerts will begin at 8 p.m. Friday at the Oxnard Performing Arts Center and at 8 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bob Mitchell seems a little embarrassed by all the fuss over his 90th birthday celebration this evening at the Downtown Palace Theatre. Mitchell, who began playing the organ for silent movies back on Christmas Day 1924, will be accompanying the 1925 Buster Keaton classic "Seven Chances" on the Hammond organ at his birthday party. "I think it's foolish," he says rather sheepishly, the reason being that his friends and fans will have to pay $15 to $18 to attend.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2002 | TIM PAGE, WASHINGTON POST
A few minutes after 1 p.m. local time today, Paul Jacobs will sit down at the organ of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception and begin to play music by Olivier Messiaen. About nine hours later, after the last note of "Livre du Saint-Sacrement" (1984) dies away, Jacobs will have played every composition Messiaen wrote for the organ, all in the course of a single day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2002 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the power of the pipe organ that first grabbed Thomas Harmon as a lad of 11 when he heard it thunder at First Methodist Church in Springfield, Ill. More than half a century later, as he prepares to step down as curator of UCLA's five organs, Harmon has grown to cherish the more delicate qualities of the "king of instruments."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Coffman, a ragtime keyboardist who helped buy a Wurlitzer pipe organ as old as he was, acquire an even older movie theater to house it, and then turn the combination into the popular Old Town Music Hall in El Segundo, has died. He was 75. Coffman died last Friday while napping at the theater as he waited for his business partner, Bill Field, to present an afternoon program. Melvin D. Horowitz, an attorney and friend, said Coffman died of complications from cardiac and pulmonary disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lloyd Holzgraf, a professional church and concert organist for 59 years and a principal designer and restorer of the mammoth surround-sound instrument at Los Angeles' First Congregational Church, one of the largest organs in the world, has died. He was 70. Holzgraf, the resident organist for that church for 38 years and for Temple Israel in Long Beach for 44 years, died early last Sunday in his Montecito Heights home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
First Congregational Church of Los Angeles will feature a performance by British organ virtuoso Thomas Trotter at 4 p.m. Sunday at 540 S. Commonwealth Ave. Trotter was appointed Birmingham's city organist in 1983 and won first prize at the 1979 St. Albans International Organ competition. In addition to being the organist for St. Margaret's Church and Westminster Abbey, Trotter is the visiting professor of organ at the Royal College of Music in London.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2001
Charles Henderson, 84, editor of the American Organist, died July 24 in New York City. Henderson, who edited the journal for more than a decade starting in 1973, conducted a production of Benjamin Britten's "Noye's Fludde" broadcast nationally on CBS television in 1964. He was on the faculty of the Union Theological Seminary's School of Sacred Music, and from 1976 to 1983 was the organist at the First Presbyterian Church in Milford, N.J. Born in West Chester, Pa.
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