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BUSINESS
December 30, 1988 | Jane Applegate
Somewhere on everyone's list of New Year's resolutions is usually a pledge to get better organized. And, according to two professional organizers, busy small business owners are notorious for letting papers pile up and files overflow. Dan Stamp, president and founder of Priority Management Systems Inc., and Stephanie Culp, founder of the Organization, suggest spending a few hours today, digging out and getting organized for the new year.
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BUSINESS
March 28, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
That's one high-hopping bunny: Shares of Berkeley-based Annie's Inc. are up more than 70% a few hours after the organic food company's public debut. Trading under the BNNY ticker symbol -- a reference to its rabbit logo -- Annie's stock is currently at $32.85 a share. It opened at $31.11 a share -- a 63.7% spike after being priced late Tuesday at $19 a share. That's after the macaroni-and-cheese maker set a target range of $16 to $18 a share, itself a boost from an original range of $14 to $16. Of the 5 million shares sold on the New York Stock Exchange, Annie's offered up 950,000 and stockholders sold 4,050,000, with the option of also releasing an additional 750,000 shares if demand stays steady.
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BUSINESS
March 28, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
That's one high-hopping bunny: Shares of Berkeley-based Annie's Inc. are up more than 70% a few hours after the organic food company's public debut. Trading under the BNNY ticker symbol -- a reference to its rabbit logo -- Annie's stock is currently at $32.85 a share. It opened at $31.11 a share -- a 63.7% spike after being priced late Tuesday at $19 a share. That's after the macaroni-and-cheese maker set a target range of $16 to $18 a share, itself a boost from an original range of $14 to $16. Of the 5 million shares sold on the New York Stock Exchange, Annie's offered up 950,000 and stockholders sold 4,050,000, with the option of also releasing an additional 750,000 shares if demand stays steady.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2010 | By Ralph Vartabedian and Ken Bensinger
In a bold national TV appearance early this month, a top executive at Toyota's U.S. sales office in Torrance declared that the automaker had discovered the exact causes of sudden acceleration in its vehicles: floor mats and sticking pedals. But only days earlier, executives from Toyota's regulatory office in Washington told congressional investigators that they could not be absolutely sure what was behind the problem. And the company's attorneys acknowledged shortly after the meeting that sticking pedals would not cause sudden acceleration.
NEWS
October 15, 1996 | MARNELL JAMESON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
We've all had them. Bad closet days. You're late for the Gibralsky meeting and you can't find your left navy pump. You pull out a wire hanger to find that it has mated with its neighbor and spawned a wiry nest of tangled offspring. That evening you come home exhausted, hoist a load of dry-cleaning onto the bowing closet rod and the whole pole and shelf collapse. Enough days like this and you reach the end of your closet pole.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1985 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
After years of unsuccessfully goading hospitals to hold down price increases, Goodyear Tire & Rubber decided to take matters into its own hands: Last August, the company rolled up its sleeves and opened its own medical center to treat employees. Located in Lawton, Okla., the medical center "is already a financial success, and we're looking into applying the concept at other manufacturing locations," said Robert E. Mercer, chairman of Goodyear.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1998 | From Associated Press
Ben & Jerry's, the offbeat Vermont ice cream maker known for its caring capitalism and wacky product names, is fighting the efforts of some of its employees to unionize. In a National Labor Relations Board hearing Tuesday, Ben & Jerry's Homemade Inc. employees sought permission to organize 19 maintenance workers at the company's plant in St. Albans, Vt. Company lawyers argued the union vote should be held among all plant workers, not just the maintenance employees.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2010 | By Ralph Vartabedian and Ken Bensinger
In a bold national TV appearance early this month, a top executive at Toyota's U.S. sales office in Torrance declared that the automaker had discovered the exact causes of sudden acceleration in its vehicles: floor mats and sticking pedals. But only days earlier, executives from Toyota's regulatory office in Washington told congressional investigators that they could not be absolutely sure what was behind the problem. And the company's attorneys acknowledged shortly after the meeting that sticking pedals would not cause sudden acceleration.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1991 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an idea whose decade had come. In 1980, the dawn of an era that would dub ambitious baby boomers yuppies, Boyd and Felice Willat created a deluxe version of the little black book. No mere calendar, this clutch-sized portmanteau served to organize a busy professional's life--from power breakfasts to late-night meetings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2002 | Nora Zamichow, Times Staff Writer
Tia Maria Torres is a patron saint of lost causes -- she rescues pit bulls, dogs so notorious that many shelters immediately kill them. A pit bull bit off part of a mail carrier's nose last summer in Los Angeles. Another pit bull mauled a 2-year-old in La Habra, tearing into his face and scalp. It's also the type of dog that sleeps curled up by Torres' head, while another snores beneath her feet at night.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1998 | From Associated Press
Ben & Jerry's, the offbeat Vermont ice cream maker known for its caring capitalism and wacky product names, is fighting the efforts of some of its employees to unionize. In a National Labor Relations Board hearing Tuesday, Ben & Jerry's Homemade Inc. employees sought permission to organize 19 maintenance workers at the company's plant in St. Albans, Vt. Company lawyers argued the union vote should be held among all plant workers, not just the maintenance employees.
NEWS
October 15, 1996 | MARNELL JAMESON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
We've all had them. Bad closet days. You're late for the Gibralsky meeting and you can't find your left navy pump. You pull out a wire hanger to find that it has mated with its neighbor and spawned a wiry nest of tangled offspring. That evening you come home exhausted, hoist a load of dry-cleaning onto the bowing closet rod and the whole pole and shelf collapse. Enough days like this and you reach the end of your closet pole.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1991 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an idea whose decade had come. In 1980, the dawn of an era that would dub ambitious baby boomers yuppies, Boyd and Felice Willat created a deluxe version of the little black book. No mere calendar, this clutch-sized portmanteau served to organize a busy professional's life--from power breakfasts to late-night meetings.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1988 | Jane Applegate
Somewhere on everyone's list of New Year's resolutions is usually a pledge to get better organized. And, according to two professional organizers, busy small business owners are notorious for letting papers pile up and files overflow. Dan Stamp, president and founder of Priority Management Systems Inc., and Stephanie Culp, founder of the Organization, suggest spending a few hours today, digging out and getting organized for the new year.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1985 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
After years of unsuccessfully goading hospitals to hold down price increases, Goodyear Tire & Rubber decided to take matters into its own hands: Last August, the company rolled up its sleeves and opened its own medical center to treat employees. Located in Lawton, Okla., the medical center "is already a financial success, and we're looking into applying the concept at other manufacturing locations," said Robert E. Mercer, chairman of Goodyear.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2005
A Louisiana jury ordered Health Net Inc. to pay $117.4 million in the collapse of a Texas health maintenance organization the company sold in 1999. Attorneys for the Texas receiver said Woodland Hills-based Health Net allowed AmCareco Inc. to buy the company with the HMO's own money, leaving the plan insolvent. Shares of Health Net fell 63 cents to $37.53. From Bloomberg News
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