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NEWS
December 6, 1996 | From Reuters
The group organizing voting in Bosnia has struck a secret deal with Serbs on rules for next year's municipal elections, officials said Thursday. The deal made by the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, or OSCE, was criticized by the Bosnian government and an international watchdog agency as prone to the abuses that marred September's national elections. Bosnian Serbs agreed Saturday to let the OSCE conduct next year's municipal elections in their half of the country.
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WORLD
December 23, 2008 | Associated Press
A team of international monitors is ending its 16-year mission in Georgia after Russia refused to allow an extension of the assignment in a dispute over two breakaway Georgian provinces. The mission by the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe expires Dec. 31, and OSCE chair Finland called a meeting to seek a three-month extension. But talks collapsed when Russia, a member of the group, demanded that the body join Moscow in recognizing the statehood of South Ossetia and Abkhazia.
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WORLD
December 23, 2008 | Associated Press
A team of international monitors is ending its 16-year mission in Georgia after Russia refused to allow an extension of the assignment in a dispute over two breakaway Georgian provinces. The mission by the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe expires Dec. 31, and OSCE chair Finland called a meeting to seek a three-month extension. But talks collapsed when Russia, a member of the group, demanded that the body join Moscow in recognizing the statehood of South Ossetia and Abkhazia.
WORLD
December 8, 2004 | Tyler Marshall, Times Staff Writer
The top diplomats from the United States and Russia clashed openly Tuesday about the role of international election monitors, adding to new strains in ties between the former Cold War rivals. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei V. Lavrov differed sharply on the issue in remarks at a gathering here of the 55-nation Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An unarmed peace monitor was shot and wounded Friday as renewed fighting spread in Kosovo, and NATO's commander warned that the separatist province appears to be just weeks away from a return to all-out war. In another attack about 16 miles south of Kosovo's capital, Pristina, Yugoslav army tanks were seen firing from the hills at villages near Stimlje. At least 15 guerrillas died in the fierce fighting, Serbian authorities claimed.
NEWS
May 23, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Separatist leader Dzhokar M. Dudayev and Russian officials in Chechnya have agreed for the first time in their five-month war to hold peace talks led by an outside mediator. The negotiations are to start Thursday in Grozny, Chechnya's Russian-held capital, under mediation of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, which has been trying for a month to bring the warring sides together.
NEWS
January 4, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government of Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic on Friday conceded for the first time a handful of opposition election victories that it had earlier annulled. But the government continued to refuse to admit defeat in other races, rejecting most of the findings of an international mediating delegation.
NEWS
December 28, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International mediators on Friday handed a moral triumph to the Serbian opposition, backing its claims of victory in elections annulled by President Slobodan Milosevic, even as heavily armed police for the second day corralled and beat dozens of anti-government protesters.
WORLD
December 8, 2004 | Tyler Marshall, Times Staff Writer
The top diplomats from the United States and Russia clashed openly Tuesday about the role of international election monitors, adding to new strains in ties between the former Cold War rivals. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei V. Lavrov differed sharply on the issue in remarks at a gathering here of the 55-nation Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe.
NEWS
December 15, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Russia's war against Chechnya continued Tuesday, with reports of skirmishes on the outskirts of the capital, Grozny, the chairman of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe spent the day in the neighboring Russian republic of Dagestan. In what is shaping up as a tightly controlled visit, Russia scheduled the main part of Knut Vollebaek's itinerary on a trip to investigate the war not in Chechnya but in Dagestan.
NEWS
December 15, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Russia's war against Chechnya continued Tuesday, with reports of skirmishes on the outskirts of the capital, Grozny, the chairman of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe spent the day in the neighboring Russian republic of Dagestan. In what is shaping up as a tightly controlled visit, Russia scheduled the main part of Knut Vollebaek's itinerary on a trip to investigate the war not in Chechnya but in Dagestan.
NEWS
November 19, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Making a rare personal appeal before an audience of 53 world leaders, President Clinton on Thursday urged Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin to seek a negotiated peace in Chechnya. Yeltsin, defiant and defensive, said the West's criticism is unacceptable while Russia is trying to end "the cancer of terrorism."
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An unarmed peace monitor was shot and wounded Friday as renewed fighting spread in Kosovo, and NATO's commander warned that the separatist province appears to be just weeks away from a return to all-out war. In another attack about 16 miles south of Kosovo's capital, Pristina, Yugoslav army tanks were seen firing from the hills at villages near Stimlje. At least 15 guerrillas died in the fierce fighting, Serbian authorities claimed.
NEWS
January 4, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government of Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic on Friday conceded for the first time a handful of opposition election victories that it had earlier annulled. But the government continued to refuse to admit defeat in other races, rejecting most of the findings of an international mediating delegation.
NEWS
December 28, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International mediators on Friday handed a moral triumph to the Serbian opposition, backing its claims of victory in elections annulled by President Slobodan Milosevic, even as heavily armed police for the second day corralled and beat dozens of anti-government protesters.
NEWS
December 6, 1996 | From Reuters
The group organizing voting in Bosnia has struck a secret deal with Serbs on rules for next year's municipal elections, officials said Thursday. The deal made by the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, or OSCE, was criticized by the Bosnian government and an international watchdog agency as prone to the abuses that marred September's national elections. Bosnian Serbs agreed Saturday to let the OSCE conduct next year's municipal elections in their half of the country.
NEWS
July 7, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armenia's ruling party appeared headed for victory Thursday in the nation's first post-Soviet elections, but international observers said it wasn't a fair fight. "Our organization stands for free and fair elections, and we have a problem with this one," said a Western poll watcher in a telephone interview from the Armenian capital, Yerevan.
NEWS
November 19, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Making a rare personal appeal before an audience of 53 world leaders, President Clinton on Thursday urged Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin to seek a negotiated peace in Chechnya. Yeltsin, defiant and defensive, said the West's criticism is unacceptable while Russia is trying to end "the cancer of terrorism."
NEWS
July 7, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armenia's ruling party appeared headed for victory Thursday in the nation's first post-Soviet elections, but international observers said it wasn't a fair fight. "Our organization stands for free and fair elections, and we have a problem with this one," said a Western poll watcher in a telephone interview from the Armenian capital, Yerevan.
NEWS
May 23, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Separatist leader Dzhokar M. Dudayev and Russian officials in Chechnya have agreed for the first time in their five-month war to hold peace talks led by an outside mediator. The negotiations are to start Thursday in Grozny, Chechnya's Russian-held capital, under mediation of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, which has been trying for a month to bring the warring sides together.
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