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Organization Of Eastern Caribbean States

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NEWS
November 27, 1988
The prime minister of St. Lucia says seven Eastern Caribbean countries should unite to increase their economic clout. John Compton, citing the U.S.-Canada free trade agreement and the success of the European Common Market, said, "The longer we hesitate (to form a political union), the more difficult the task becomes." Compton, speaking at a meeting of the seven-nation Organization of Eastern Caribbean States in St. Lucia, is the strongest supporter for combining his country, St.
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NEWS
November 27, 1988
The prime minister of St. Lucia says seven Eastern Caribbean countries should unite to increase their economic clout. John Compton, citing the U.S.-Canada free trade agreement and the success of the European Common Market, said, "The longer we hesitate (to form a political union), the more difficult the task becomes." Compton, speaking at a meeting of the seven-nation Organization of Eastern Caribbean States in St. Lucia, is the strongest supporter for combining his country, St.
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NEWS
October 26, 1987 | United Press International
Government and business leaders from the seven countries that make up the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States will begin a two-day meeting Tuesday in Castries to consider establishing a common bureau of standards, the organization said. The seven countries--St. Lucia, Grenada, Dominica, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, St. Kitts-Nevis, Montserrat and Antigua and Barbuda--already share a common currency, the eastern Caribbean dollar, valued at 37 cents to the United States dollar.
NEWS
February 20, 1986 | Associated Press
President Reagan, at a ceremony commemorating the U.S. invasion that toppled this Caribbean island's Marxist government, said today he "will never be sorry" for ordering the operation, in which 19 Americans died. Reagan also told a crowd of Grenadians estimated at 20,000 that the United States "must help those struggling for freedom in Nicaragua," but ruled out any use of American force.
NEWS
September 3, 1994 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing concerns about passenger safety, federal officials Friday barred the airlines of nine Latin American and African countries from operating to or from the United States. Transportation Secretary Federico Pena said a three-year investigation by U.S. officials showed that aviation regulations of the nine countries are too lax to guarantee acceptable pilot training and aircraft maintenance.
NEWS
August 26, 2001 | ALEXANDRA OLSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Venezuela reacted fiercely when tiny Eastern Caribbean states recently questioned its 136-year-old claim to a patch of coral that is closer to Puerto Rico than to Venezuela. "We don't want any problems. But Aves Island has always been Venezuelan," President Hugo Chavez warned. The 12 acres of Aves, Spanish for "bird," are home to a few fishermen and a decrepit weather station. But it joins a list of territorial disputes that have vexed Venezuela's neighbors.
NEWS
May 9, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this remote corner of the Caribbean, leaders of eight tiny island states scattered across hundreds of miles of open sea are trying to become one. Bucking a global trend, under which thousands of miles of borders have been redrawn and more than a dozen new nations have been carved in the last decade out of failed federations, the prime ministers of these West Indies islands are quietly attempting a feat that eluded their forefathers for generations: confederation.
TRAVEL
September 18, 2005 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
THE recent spate of air crashes could cause anyone to wonder about the safety of flying. With at least four accidents that together claimed more than 300 lives, August was the deadliest month for commercial aviation in more than three years. It was also notable for a dramatic accident in which an Air France Airbus overshot a Toronto runway and caught fire; no one died. On Sept.
TRAVEL
October 28, 1990 | PETER S. GREENBERG
"I'm sorry," said the jovial counter agent at the Barbados airport. "Your plane is late." Then again, the LIAT plane to Grenada is almost always late. "May I suggest an earlier flight?" An earlier one? "Yes. It arrives later. But I think you should take it, because the later flight will probably be very late. Don't worry," he said with a smile. "You'll get there. It's worth the wait." As it turned out, he was right on all counts.
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