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September 15, 1997 | JEAN LIPMAN-BLUMEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Jean Lipman-Blumen is the Thornton F. Bradshaw professor of public policy and a professor of organizational behavior at the Peter F. Drucker Graduate Management Center at Claremont Graduate University. She is also co-founder and co-director of the Institute for Advanced Studies in Leadership at Claremont
Work and the workplace are morphing at tremendous speed. In short order, we have evolved from a predominantly industrial nation to a land of "knowledge workers." Are yesterday's management styles obsolete? What approaches will be appropriate for managing tomorrow's workers? Here, two California authorities on organizational behavior speculate about the management model for--dare we say it?--the millennium.
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NEWS
July 30, 1999 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Across the state and nation, among many organizations that provide legal services to the poorest of the poor, merger mania is in the air. Although there have been marriages between legal aid groups in the past, the current wave of consolidations and merger talks is occurring at a speed and scale unprecedented in legal services history. The driving force is the Legal Services Corp., the quasi-government agency that allocates congressional funding for legal aid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1998 | COLL METCALFE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of serving as an outspoken leader for the Republican right at the local level, Simi Valley activist Steve Frank appears ready to hit the big time. The 51-year-old printing supplies salesman is fast at work building himself a broader platform as president of the National Federation of Republican Assemblies--a grass-roots movement aimed at molding the GOP in its own, rigidly conservative image.
NEWS
September 14, 1991 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles attorney Melanie Lomax and her mother, Almena, are beyond the standard mother-daughter squabbling, but one subject is guaranteed to incite debate: the NAACP. Almena Lomax, a retired newspaper publisher in her 70s, has been a lifetime member of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People and continues to support it. But her daughter, general counsel of the Los Angeles chapter from 1984 to 1987, quit the national organization and is now a critic.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | ELIZABETH CHRISTIE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Julia Garmash wants to be a journalist, but she knows that it takes more than wishes and hopes. And to get an idea of how the press operates--and perhaps some experience herself--she's working part time in a foreign news bureau in Moscow. What could be more natural for a university-bound 17-year-old? In most places, nothing. But Garmash is a Soviet teenager, and Soviet youth typically have not worked their way through school in the past.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Down through the century-long history of the Tournament of Roses, candidates for Rose Queen and her court do their best to win approval from the panel of nine men who determine who will preside over the Rose Parade. To a man, this year's judges are men. Ditto, last year. And the year before. Only once, in 1988, has a woman served on the prestigious Queen and Court Committee that members of the Tournament of Roses Assn. consider the sugar plum among plum assignments in the volunteer association.
NEWS
April 17, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mounting their first detailed defense against allegations of illegal spying, officials of the Anti-Defamation League sought Friday to distance themselves from a controversial longtime investigator but acknowledged they were still paying him because he is "damn good." Barbara S.
NEWS
July 19, 1990 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rosa M. C. Cumare faces a dilemma. She belongs to two groups that endorse the equivalent of murder. At least that's how she sees things, now that the Los Angeles County Bar Assn. and the American Bar Assn. are on record with a resolution supporting a woman's right to make her own decisions concerning abortion.
MAGAZINE
July 15, 1990 | SHELDON TEITELBAUM and TOM WALDMAN, Sheldon Teitelbaum, a frequent contributor to The Times, is an L.A. correspondent for Cinefantastique. Tom Waldman regularly covers Los Angeles politics for California Journal and other publications.
LAST YEAR, WHEN the Berlin Wall fell and the word reunification was murmured in the halls of power, the American Jewish community held its breath. Nobody had to be reminded of what happened to European Jewry the last time Germany was one. Reluctant to risk sparking world ire by opposing reunification while television transmitted dramatic pictures of the decimated Berlin Wall, most American Jews were content to let the British, French, Poles and Soviets express concern on their own behalf.
NATIONAL
May 16, 2013 | By Matea Gold, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - In spring 2010, agents in the Cincinnati office of the Internal Revenue Service, which handles applications for tax-exempt status, faced a surge of filings by new advocacy groups, with little guidance on how to treat them. Their decision to deal with the problem by singling out tea party and other conservative groups for extra scrutiny has now triggered a criminal inquiry, congressional investigations, the departure of two top IRS officials and the naming of a new acting commissioner Thursday.
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