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Organized Crime Colombia

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NEWS
June 20, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pablo Escobar, the billionaire cocaine lord who eluded an intense police manhunt for seven years, surrendered to Colombian authorities Wednesday in exchange for a promise of leniency for drug-related crimes and a guarantee against extradition to the United States.
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NEWS
March 16, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Piedad Cordoba knew she was a target. As chairwoman of the Senate Human Rights Committee in this country where politicians are regularly kidnapped or assassinated, she had alienated guerrillas, right-wing private armies and even members of the government. Still, Colombians were shocked when she and her bodyguard were surrounded by 15 armed people in uniforms of national investigative police at a clinic in the fashionable El Poblado district of this violent city.
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NEWS
March 16, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Piedad Cordoba knew she was a target. As chairwoman of the Senate Human Rights Committee in this country where politicians are regularly kidnapped or assassinated, she had alienated guerrillas, right-wing private armies and even members of the government. Still, Colombians were shocked when she and her bodyguard were surrounded by 15 armed people in uniforms of national investigative police at a clinic in the fashionable El Poblado district of this violent city.
NEWS
November 19, 1999 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signaling a link between drug trafficking and the arms deals of Colombian death squads, a court in Managua on Thursday convicted a former Nicaraguan policeman turned arms dealer of possession of narcotics and illegal weapons. Colombian authorities have long accused the right-wing "self-defense forces" that fight the country's Marxist guerrillas of ties to narcotics barons who supply three-fourths of the cocaine and a growing share of the heroin consumed in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1999 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest in a wave of Southland jewel holdups, four gunmen forced a car in which two jewelry dealers were traveling off a street near Los Angeles International Airport late Thursday, taking two bags of jewels and cash. Police said Friday that the robbery may have been committed by a sophisticated ring of Colombian nationals believed to be responsible for terrorizing jewelers in Southern California and other parts of the country.
NEWS
November 10, 1995 | STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The recording on the newscast shocked even Colombians who thought they were inured to violence after decades of civil war and drug-related murders. "We want $8,000 to deliver [his] head," said the voice of a guerrilla negotiating with a woman for the body of her slain son. "If you want to come up with the money, we'll give you the instructions. If not, we dump him in a hole."
NEWS
March 13, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
A huge cache of drug money linked to a Cali cartel kingpin may provide the hardest evidence yet for long-standing U.S. charges that drug lords are trafficking narcotics from inside Colombia's prisons. Nearly $5 million in suspected cocaine cash was discovered by police Tuesday in a raid on a house in the southwestern city of Cali, most of it in $100 and $50 bills sealed in wrappers marked "Reserva Federal Bank," an apparent reference to the U.S. Federal Reserve.
NEWS
June 12, 1995 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every time someone in the United States sniffs cocaine, injects heroin or inhales from a crack pipe, someone here in the global capital of illegal narcotics trafficking gets a bit richer and a bit more powerful. Cali, Colombia's third-largest city, was once best known for hot salsa bands, a dance-loving population and a laid-back manner. But it has become "a sewer of corruption and violence," according to a local businessman who asked not to be named.
NEWS
August 7, 1995 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a raid early Sunday, Colombian police captured the reputed leader of their country's major drug-trafficking group, prompting Colombia's foreign minister to declare that "the Cali cartel is dead."
NEWS
November 14, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The best, and probably the last, hope for bringing the heads of the Cali drug cartel to trial in the United States languishes in Colombia's notorious Modelo prison. This prisoner's lawyers insist that he is a Colombian named Jose Luis Caicedo. U.S. and Colombian authorities are convinced that he is really Fernando Flores, a Venezuelan who may be the key to proving that Miguel and Gilberto Rodriguez Orejuela continued to run their narcotics empire from a Colombian prison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1999 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest in a wave of Southland jewel holdups, four gunmen forced a car in which two jewelry dealers were traveling off a street near Los Angeles International Airport late Thursday, taking two bags of jewels and cash. Police said Friday that the robbery may have been committed by a sophisticated ring of Colombian nationals believed to be responsible for terrorizing jewelers in Southern California and other parts of the country.
NEWS
November 14, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The best, and probably the last, hope for bringing the heads of the Cali drug cartel to trial in the United States languishes in Colombia's notorious Modelo prison. This prisoner's lawyers insist that he is a Colombian named Jose Luis Caicedo. U.S. and Colombian authorities are convinced that he is really Fernando Flores, a Venezuelan who may be the key to proving that Miguel and Gilberto Rodriguez Orejuela continued to run their narcotics empire from a Colombian prison.
NEWS
March 13, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
A huge cache of drug money linked to a Cali cartel kingpin may provide the hardest evidence yet for long-standing U.S. charges that drug lords are trafficking narcotics from inside Colombia's prisons. Nearly $5 million in suspected cocaine cash was discovered by police Tuesday in a raid on a house in the southwestern city of Cali, most of it in $100 and $50 bills sealed in wrappers marked "Reserva Federal Bank," an apparent reference to the U.S. Federal Reserve.
NEWS
November 10, 1995 | STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The recording on the newscast shocked even Colombians who thought they were inured to violence after decades of civil war and drug-related murders. "We want $8,000 to deliver [his] head," said the voice of a guerrilla negotiating with a woman for the body of her slain son. "If you want to come up with the money, we'll give you the instructions. If not, we dump him in a hole."
NEWS
August 16, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Colombian version of Watergate has President Ernesto Samper staggering under allegations that powerful drug lords contributed millions of dollars to his campaign last year. The widening scandal--dubbed "drogagate" by the media in a play on the Spanish word for drugs--could cost Samper his job, analysts say. "I'm inclined to think that he will fall," said Rodrigo Losada, a political scientist at Bogota's Javeriana University.
NEWS
August 7, 1995 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a raid early Sunday, Colombian police captured the reputed leader of their country's major drug-trafficking group, prompting Colombia's foreign minister to declare that "the Cali cartel is dead."
NEWS
August 16, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Colombian version of Watergate has President Ernesto Samper staggering under allegations that powerful drug lords contributed millions of dollars to his campaign last year. The widening scandal--dubbed "drogagate" by the media in a play on the Spanish word for drugs--could cost Samper his job, analysts say. "I'm inclined to think that he will fall," said Rodrigo Losada, a political scientist at Bogota's Javeriana University.
NEWS
November 19, 1999 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signaling a link between drug trafficking and the arms deals of Colombian death squads, a court in Managua on Thursday convicted a former Nicaraguan policeman turned arms dealer of possession of narcotics and illegal weapons. Colombian authorities have long accused the right-wing "self-defense forces" that fight the country's Marxist guerrillas of ties to narcotics barons who supply three-fourths of the cocaine and a growing share of the heroin consumed in the United States.
NEWS
June 12, 1995 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every time someone in the United States sniffs cocaine, injects heroin or inhales from a crack pipe, someone here in the global capital of illegal narcotics trafficking gets a bit richer and a bit more powerful. Cali, Colombia's third-largest city, was once best known for hot salsa bands, a dance-loving population and a laid-back manner. But it has become "a sewer of corruption and violence," according to a local businessman who asked not to be named.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pablo Escobar, the billionaire cocaine lord who eluded an intense police manhunt for seven years, surrendered to Colombian authorities Wednesday in exchange for a promise of leniency for drug-related crimes and a guarantee against extradition to the United States.
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