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BUSINESS
September 3, 1999 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bank of New York Co. has fired another executive amid the intensifying federal probe into whether the Russian mafia used accounts there to launder billions of dollars drained from the former Soviet Union. A person familiar with the case said the employee, Svetlana Kurdryavstev, a New York-based associate in the bank's international division who handled Eastern European accounts, was fired for failing to cooperate in the bank's internal review of "certain accounts."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles-based prosecutor engaged in fighting organized crime that originates in the former Soviet Union said Sunday that he was resigning to protest the role that his boss, U.S. Atty. Alejandro N. Mayorkas, played in winning the prison release of a convicted cocaine trafficker. Assistant U.S. Atty.
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NEWS
February 13, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin declared on Friday that organized crime is now "the No. 1 threat to Russia's strategic interests" and outlined steps to break its corrupt hold on the government. Speaking to law enforcement officers, Yeltsin and Vice President Alexander V.
NEWS
December 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Two masked gunmen opened fire on a Moscow deputy mayor as he neared City Hall, wounding him and killing his driver. The morning attack on Deputy Mayor Iosif Ordzhonikidze left 26 bullet holes in his car and was described as most likely the work of organized crime elements unhappy over one of his decisions.
NEWS
June 12, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day after President Boris N. Yeltsin demanded that Russia be cleansed of its "criminal filth," the nation's top law enforcement officials announced a $2.6-billion program Saturday to crack down on organized crime. The move follows a bloody spring of bombings, hijackings, drive-by shootings, paid assassinations of business leaders and unrelenting corruption that have undermined Russians' fragile confidence in their 3-year-old government.
NEWS
June 21, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a typical night at Porky's, a strip joint known for its Russian dancers in the seedy Miami suburb of Hialeah. The girls were grinding on the dance floor while, inside the club's inner office, cut off from the driving rhythms, owner Ludwig Fainberg was talking business. Big business, federal prosecutors now say: drug business, Russian mafia business and how the two were coming together in a single deal. And the U.S. government was listening.
NEWS
February 26, 1994 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To FBI Director Louis J. Freeh, organized crime in Russia today bears disturbing similarities to Chicago's in the 1920s and 1930s--violent but fractionalized, a danger to itself as much as to the rest of society, and with a potential for much more. The likes of Al Capone, unchecked by the FBI or any other law enforcement body, welded the Chicago mob into a unified force that preyed on the community for decades.
NEWS
July 5, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that organized crime in Russia poses "a significant and direct threat to the United States," FBI Director Louis J. Freeh won support from Russian police Monday for a joint crackdown on mobsters, including anyone trying to pirate and sell nuclear bomb-making material. "We are proud to join in this battle with you," Freeh said in a pep talk to 500 elite officers at Russia's Interior Ministry Academy.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1998 | DAVID OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case that renewed fears of organized crime moving into the lucrative health-care business, federal prosecutors have accused a Burbank medical laboratory of paying kickbacks to dozens of California doctors as part of a widespread billing fraud scheme. The complex scheme was allegedly masterminded by Dr. Aramais Paronyan, who runs Health Line Clinical Laboratory in Burbank and several other labs in California, prosecutors said Friday.
NEWS
November 10, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They should have been friendlier to the neighbors. The three foreigners first raised suspicions in the Andean mountain village of Facatativa because they never smiled or waved. Then people noticed that they always had food delivered and seldom emerged from the warehouse where they worked. Finally, someone called the police. Officers, shocked by what they discovered when they entered the warehouse during a predawn raid Sept. 7, made two phone calls: one to the U.S.
NEWS
November 10, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They should have been friendlier to the neighbors. The three foreigners first raised suspicions in the Andean mountain village of Facatativa because they never smiled or waved. Then people noticed that they always had food delivered and seldom emerged from the warehouse where they worked. Finally, someone called the police. Officers, shocked by what they discovered when they entered the warehouse during a predawn raid Sept. 7, made two phone calls: one to the U.S.
NEWS
December 7, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reversing a decision by local election officials, the Russian Supreme Court ruled Monday that reputed organized crime boss Sergei Mikhailov can run for parliament in elections scheduled for Dec. 19. Mikhailov, who spent 26 months in jail in Switzerland awaiting trial on organized crime charges before being acquitted in 1998, had been removed from the ballot on the grounds that he held dual Russian and Greek citizenship.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1999 | ANNETTE HADDAD and SCOTT DOGGETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's nothing better than a good roof to protect you from the elements, as anyone doing business in Russia today will tell you. A Russian "roof" will shelter you from arson, shakedowns, meddlesome bureaucrats, bribe-hungry tax officials--for a price, of course.
SPORTS
October 7, 1999 | HELLENE ELLIOTT
Pavel Bure knew what was coming. Not a pass. Not a goal. The Florida Panthers' brilliant right wing knew he was about to face a question regarding his friends, some of whom the NHL views as more like enemies. "Oh, you mean the Mafia?" Bure said, smiling.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration launched its first broad offensive against money laundering Thursday, mounting an aggressive campaign to intercept hundreds of billions of dollars a year flowing into U.S. banks and institutions from criminals. The administration's multi-pronged strategy, developed at the prodding of Congress, took on a more urgent tone amid an ongoing federal investigation into allegations that Russian mafia figures funneled vast sums of money into the Bank of New York and other U.S.
NEWS
September 23, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the Bank of New York stirred the ongoing controversy over alleged Russian money laundering Wednesday, acknowledging to a congressional committee that two accounts reportedly linked to the son-in-law of Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin "do exist at the Bank of New York." The Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday that investigators are looking into two accounts at the bank's Cayman Islands branch that are connected to the son-in-law, Leonid Dyachenko.
NEWS
September 14, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rocket-propelled grenade fired across the busy Garden Ring Road at rush hour Wednesday blasted into the sixth floor of the U.S. Embassy in an attack by unknown assailants. No one was injured by the grenade that struck the stone exterior of the stately yellow-and-white building at 4:25 p.m., embassy spokeswoman Olivia Hilton said. The blast was absorbed by a large photocopying machine that shielded much of the interior from flying glass and fragments, she said.
NEWS
December 12, 1998 | From Reuters
A Swiss court Friday cleared Russian businessman Sergei Mikhailov, accused of heading a major Moscow crime family, of charges that he belonged to a criminal organization, an official announcement said. The ruling came after an eight-day trial during which witnesses from Russia and the United States gave evidence for and against Mikhailov, 40, who had faced up to 7 1/2 years in jail if convicted.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1999 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bank of New York Co. has fired another executive amid the intensifying federal probe into whether the Russian mafia used accounts there to launder billions of dollars drained from the former Soviet Union. A person familiar with the case said the employee, Svetlana Kurdryavstev, a New York-based associate in the bank's international division who handled Eastern European accounts, was fired for failing to cooperate in the bank's internal review of "certain accounts."
BUSINESS
August 20, 1999 | Washington Post
A kingpin of Russian organized crime is believed to have cycled billions of dollars in illicit funds through Bank of New York in a massive money-laundering scheme, according to U.S. officials. Government sources said Semion Mogilevich, dubbed the "brainy don," is the leader of a ruthless Russian mob family known as the Red Mafia that is said to be behind the transfer of money through the bank.
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