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Orion Pictures

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BUSINESS
December 30, 1986
The motion picture and television company signed a 15-year lease to move its West Coast operations in April to the 1888 Century Park East building, previously called the Tiger International building. About 360 Orion employees will move from three other Los Angeles-area offices, including its current headquarters at 1875 Century Park East, an Orion spokesman said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2010 | Bloomberg News
John Kluge, a billionaire entrepreneur and pioneer in independent television-station ownership whose Metromedia Inc. stations formed the basis for News Corp.'s Fox network, has died. He was 95. Kluge died Tuesday at his home in Albemarle County, Va., said University of Virginia spokeswoman Marian Anderfuren, who gave no cause of death. Kluge donated more than $63 million to the university during his lifetime, including his Albemarle estate, which was valued at more than $45 million in 2001.
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REAL ESTATE
February 15, 1987 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Orion Pictures ("Hannah and Her Sisters," "Desperately Seeking Susan") signed what is believed to be the biggest office lease in Century City's history in December, but the answer to "How big is biggest?" hasn't been publicized until now. The 15-year lease for 80,000 square feet on six floors of the 1888 Century Park East building is valued at nearly $29 million. But here's the clincher: A bigger office deal is expected to be signed in Century City soon. More on that later. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2000
I saw the picture of John Hegeman and was sure, when I glanced at the phrase "obnoxious entertainment exec" in the article, that the writer was describing him ("Old, New Hollywood Meet to Put an Odd Twist on Entertainment," by Amy Wallace, Aug. 23). As Hegeman himself will tell you, he is a master marketer--a master of marketing himself. I'll be sick if I read one more time how Hegeman is responsible for the success of "The Blair Witch Project." I suppose his co-workers and the filmmakers, among others, had nothing to do with it. Hegeman was simply in the right place at the right time.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1992 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With an important bankruptcy court hearing looming, another possible purchaser of troubled Orion Pictures emerged Tuesday--MGM-Pathe Communications Co. The entry of MGM, owned by the French bank Credit Lyonnais, raises to three the number of bidders seeking to acquire or merge with Orion, producer of "The Silence of the Lambs," 1991's Oscar juggernaut. Orion filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in December, despite a years-long string of Academy Awards.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1991 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Executives at Orion Pictures Corp. can probably relate to the scene in which the two heroes from its latest release, "Bill and Ted's Bogus Journey," encounter the Grim Reaper. Orion is engaged in its own bid for survival as it works to persuade bondholders, creditors and the banking community that the ailing film company is worth more alive than dead. Looming bank and interest obligations of more than $66 million have backed Orion into a corner.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Orion Makes Distribution Deal: Orion Pictures Corp. has signed a long-term deal with Paris-based CineFin Corp. CineFin will fund up to $200 million in motion picture development, production and marketing costs annually for three years, according to the company's announcement. Orion, which has been struggling to recover from financial difficulties, will have North American distribution rights to the films.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1990 | United Press International
Orion Pictures Sued Over Plot in "Back to School": Orion Pictures was sued in Los Angeles Superior Court Monday by a husband-and-wife screenwriting team who claim that they wrote the basic plot for the 1986 movie "Back to School." George and Elizabeth Gage of Telluride, Colo., claim that they submitted a screenplay called "Second Season" to Orion in 1979. Rodney Dangerfield, who starred in the film, director Alan Metter and 11 others also were named. (Filed April 2, 1990. Case No. C757058)
BUSINESS
February 9, 1999
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. said its Orion Pictures unit sued Sony Corp.'s film unit for more than $20 million, claiming it underreported revenue from distributing Orion's home videos overseas. The suit, filed in Los Angeles Superior Court, charges that Columbia TriStar Home Video and others with breach of contract for "failing properly to account to Orion for monies received" by Sony for Orion videos distributed between 1985 and 1992.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1997 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Las Vegas billionaire Kirk Kerkorian is negotiating to acquire beleaguered Orion Pictures, primarily for its substantial film library, and a decision is expected by mid- to late-week, sources close to the deal said Sunday. One person familiar with the talks characterized the odds at "60-40" that Kerkorian would buy Orion from fellow billionaire John Kluge.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1997 | SHAUNA SNOW
TV & RADIO 'Ellen' Under Fire: The "Ellen" episode in which Ellen DeGeneres' character "comes out" as a lesbian is again putting television on the firing line for its "family values." On Thursday a lobbying group chastised Disney, ABC and the producers of "Ellen," calling the show a "slap in the face to America's families." The Media Research Center took out a full-page ad in the trade paper Daily Variety to express its views, which a spokesman said have been underrepresented by the media.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1996 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The struggle over Samuel Goldwyn Co., one of Hollywood's few remaining independent film distributors, ended Wednesday when billionaire John Kluge's Metromedia International Group Inc. announced plans to acquire the company in a deal valued at $115 million. Metromedia's offer comes in two parts: $42.5 million in stock--$5 worth of Metromedia stock for each Goldwyn share--and the assumption of $72.5 million in bank debt that Goldwyn was under increasing pressure to pay.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1995 | JAMES BATES
Studios: Billionaire John Kluge, seeking to revive Orion Pictures, is buying movie producer Motion Picture Corp. of America for $32.5 million. The company, headed by Bradley R. Krevoy and Steven Stabler, is best known for producing the Jim Carrey hit comedy "Dumb and Dumber" that was distributed by New Line Cinema. As part of the deal, Krevoy and Stabler will be put in charge of production for Orion, and will try to revive the company's filmmaking efforts.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1992 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John W. Kluge, reportedly America's richest man, has agreed to infuse cash and forgive debts owed him as part of a deal to help rescue foundering Orion Pictures from bankruptcy, according to people familiar with the proposal. Kluge, who already owns 68% of the studio's stock, has agreed to put up $25 million in cash and to write off $29 million owed him in connection with Orion's 1990 release of the film "Mermaids."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1990
. . . Troubled Orion Pictures kicked off 1990 with "Everybody Wins," released in 70 cities Friday without an advance screening for reporters and critics. Why did Orion hide the film before its opening? The studio promised a statement, but repeated calls got no response.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1992 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With an important bankruptcy court hearing looming, another possible purchaser of troubled Orion Pictures emerged Tuesday--MGM-Pathe Communications Co. The entry of MGM, owned by the French bank Credit Lyonnais, raises to three the number of bidders seeking to acquire or merge with Orion, producer of "The Silence of the Lambs," 1991's Oscar juggernaut. Orion filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in December, despite a years-long string of Academy Awards.
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