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Orlando Letelier

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NEWS
March 2, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The trial of Gen. Manuel Contreras for the assassination of Orlando Letelier is nearing its end--more than 16 years after the bomb slaying in Washington. That, in itself, is a sign of how things have changed in Chile since the return of civilian rule in 1990. Under military rule, the Letelier case posed little if any threat to Contreras, former chief of the regime's feared political police.
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MAGAZINE
July 21, 2002 | ERIC PAPE
Look into the face of Virgilio Pablo Paz Romero. Do you see a terrorist? Sitting in Versailles, a sprawling Cuban restaurant in the heart of Miami's Little Havana, the only thing that seems to separate Paz from the middle-aged, Cuban-born fathers eating with their kids is the distinctive cleft in his chin. There is no trace of the hardened gaze of his youth three decades ago. Then he speaks, explaining intensely that he didn't realize how American he had become until Sept. 11.
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NEWS
September 13, 1991 | Reuters
A Cuban emigre was sentenced Thursday to 12 years in jail for his part in the 1976 car-bomb killing of Chilean diplomat Orlando Letelier on Washington's Embassy Row. Judge Aubrey Robinson sentenced Virgilio Paz Romero, 39, to the maximum term allowed under a plea-bargain agreement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1999 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Francisco Letelier came to Washington, he thought his family was finally safe from the soldiers who ousted Chile's democratic government and held his father at a bleak island prison. That assurance vanished in 1976, when he was pulled out of high school to find that his father, Chilean pro-democracy exile leader Orlando Letelier, was killed a mile from the White House by a car bomb. An American colleague, Ronni Moffitt, died with him.
NEWS
May 7, 1987
A former Chilean secret police captain was sentenced to seven years in prison for his role in the 1976 car-bombing death of Chilean diplomat Orlando Letelier. Armando Fernandez, 37, pleaded guilty in February to a charge of accessory to murder and was granted federal protection. Letelier and an American friend, Ronni Moffett, were killed by the explosion while driving through Embassy Row in Washington. Fernandez is one of three Chilean intelligence officials indicted in Letelier's slaying.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | Associated Press
A Cuban exile who had been a fugitive for 12 years until his arrest last spring pleaded guilty Monday to conspiring to kill a former Chilean diplomat who died in a 1976 car bombing on Washington's Embassy Row. Jose Dionisio Suarez Esquivel admitted participating in the conspiracy to murder Orlando Letelier, who died with associate Ronni Moffitt when a bomb exploded beneath their car on Sept. 21, 1976.
NEWS
September 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former secret police chief Manuel Contreras was arrested in Santiago in connection with the 1976 assassination of exiled Socialist leader Orlando Letelier in Washington. Acting on a court order, police also arrested Contreras' deputy, Pedro Espinoza, who was chief of intelligence operations under former military ruler Augusto Pinochet, Interior Ministry officials said. Contreras and Espinoza are wanted in the United States for masterminding the slaying of Letelier with a car bomb.
NEWS
December 27, 1991 | Associated Press
The Supreme Court granted bail Thursday to two former secret police officials pending their trial for the 1976 killings in Washington of a former Chilean ambassador to the United States and his American aide. Retired Gens. Manuel Contreras and Pedro Espinoza were freed on $2,700 bail each. No trial date has been set for the two, charged with ordering the killing of Orlando Letelier and Ronni Moffit, who died when a remote-control bomb blew up their car.
NEWS
April 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The final fugitive indicted in the assassination of former Chilean Ambassador Orlando Letelier was arrested on charges that he triggered the 1976 car-bomb slaying. Virgilio Paz Romero, 39, was apprehended after a tip was telephoned to a Customs Service agent. Paz was identified after a re-enactment of the assassination last week on the television program "America's Most Wanted," said William Gavin, FBI chief in Miami.
NEWS
November 13, 1993 | From Associated Press
Two leaders of the secret police during Gen. Augusto Pinochet's regime were convicted Friday in the 1976 assassination in Washington of Orlando Letelier, an exiled foe of the military government. Lawyer Fabiola Letelier, a sister of the slain official, said she was informed of the convictions by the Supreme Court. She said Justice Adolfo Banados had sentenced retired Gen. Manuel Contreras to seven years in prison and Brig. Pedro Espinoza, who is still on active duty, to six years.
NEWS
June 1, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that the Chilean Supreme Court has sentenced a former secret police chief to prison for ordering a 1976 assassination in Washington, D.C., this nervous nation is asking: Will he go peacefully? After Tuesday's Supreme Court decision to uphold a seven-year sentence for retired army Gen. Manuel Contreras, 66, the former secret police chief told a television interviewer: "I am not going to any jail as long as there is no real justice."
NEWS
May 31, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court upheld the prison sentences of two top military officers Tuesday for ordering the 1976 assassination of Orlando Letelier, a prominent Chilean Socialist who was killed by a car bomb in Washington. Retired army Gen. Manuel Contreras, chief of the ruthless secret police agency that persecuted opponents of Chile's military regime in the mid-1970s, received a seven-year sentence. The court imposed a six-year term on Brig.
NEWS
November 19, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retired Gen. Manuel Contreras, flanked by bodyguards and police, had just received formal notification of a Chilean judge's seven-year sentence against him for ordering the murder of exiled Socialist Orlando Letelier in Washington, D.C. "I'm not going to any jail, because justice is going to prevail," Contreras told reporters.
NEWS
November 13, 1993 | From Associated Press
Two leaders of the secret police during Gen. Augusto Pinochet's regime were convicted Friday in the 1976 assassination in Washington of Orlando Letelier, an exiled foe of the military government. Lawyer Fabiola Letelier, a sister of the slain official, said she was informed of the convictions by the Supreme Court. She said Justice Adolfo Banados had sentenced retired Gen. Manuel Contreras to seven years in prison and Brig. Pedro Espinoza, who is still on active duty, to six years.
NEWS
March 2, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The trial of Gen. Manuel Contreras for the assassination of Orlando Letelier is nearing its end--more than 16 years after the bomb slaying in Washington. That, in itself, is a sign of how things have changed in Chile since the return of civilian rule in 1990. Under military rule, the Letelier case posed little if any threat to Contreras, former chief of the regime's feared political police.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"For many artists, a particular time or event will be a starting point for art in their lives. And I've realized that that's OK, so long as you jump out from that and go somewhere." For Francisco Letelier, that jumping-off point was one that evokes horror. The artist's father, a Chilean ambassador to the United States during the Allende regime, was assassinated in Washington by a car bomb in 1976, after the military takeover of Chile by Gen. Augusto Pinochet.
NEWS
July 31, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Cuban exile pleaded guilty to conspiracy to murder in the 1976 car-bombing of Chilean Ambassador Orlando Letelier in Washington. Virgilio Paz Romero, alleged to have detonated the bomb that killed Letelier and his aide, Ronni Moffitt, was arrested in April in Florida. He will be sentenced Sept. 5 for one count of conspiracy to murder an internationally protected foreign official.
NEWS
January 12, 1992 | From Associated Press
The families of the late Chilean Ambassador Orlando Letelier and his aide Ronnie Moffitt will share in a $2.6-million settlement under a decision announced Saturday by the State Department. The money will be paid by the government of Chile to the U.S. government for distribution to the families affected by the 1976 car bombing in Washington that killed Letelier and Moffitt. Part of the money also will go to Michael Moffitt, who was injured in the blast. The Moffitts were married.
NEWS
December 27, 1991 | Associated Press
The Supreme Court granted bail Thursday to two former secret police officials pending their trial for the 1976 killings in Washington of a former Chilean ambassador to the United States and his American aide. Retired Gens. Manuel Contreras and Pedro Espinoza were freed on $2,700 bail each. No trial date has been set for the two, charged with ordering the killing of Orlando Letelier and Ronni Moffit, who died when a remote-control bomb blew up their car.
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