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NEWS
May 30, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This capital's delicate calm was shattered Wednesday, the day after a rebel movement occupying the city declared itself a new government, as crowds of demonstrators ranged about town protesting the takeover and the American government's involvement in the affair. At least eight separate mobs surged through the city beginning just before noon, chanting anti-rebel and anti-American slogans.
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NEWS
April 15, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When four bombs went off in hotels and restaurants here earlier this month, wounding at least 18 people, the significance of the first explosions heard in the city since last May's battle to overthrow the nation's dictator was lost on almost no one. To many, they marked what could be the start of Ethiopia's new civil war.
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NEWS
April 15, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When four bombs went off in hotels and restaurants here earlier this month, wounding at least 18 people, the significance of the first explosions heard in the city since last May's battle to overthrow the nation's dictator was lost on almost no one. To many, they marked what could be the start of Ethiopia's new civil war.
NEWS
May 30, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This capital's delicate calm was shattered Wednesday, the day after a rebel movement occupying the city declared itself a new government, as crowds of demonstrators ranged about town protesting the takeover and the American government's involvement in the affair. At least eight separate mobs surged through the city beginning just before noon, chanting anti-rebel and anti-American slogans.
NEWS
May 29, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An army of youthful and remarkably disciplined rebel soldiers was in full military command of this capital Tuesday, and in London agreement was reached under U.S. mediation for the rebels to rule the country until a new provisional government is formed. Troops of the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF) took control of Addis Ababa after a dawn assault that found the city almost entirely undefended by government forces. The anxiety of the city's 2.
NEWS
May 28, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebel forces moved into this capital city at dawn today, with a coordinated assault on the presidential palace, the international airport and other strategic points. Within hours, the rebels claimed they had taken over the capital, Reuters news service reported. The shooting broke out about 5:30 a.m. Rebel tanks moved up the hill in front of the palace and quickly scored a hit on the compound's ammunition dump, which was still burning two hours later.
NEWS
June 4, 1991 | Reuters
International relief agencies said Monday they are trying to arrange an airdrop of food to 400,000 Sudanese refugees driven out of Ethiopia into a swamp, where they are being bombed by Sudan's air force. Relief workers said the refugees were chased out of their camps near Gambela in southwestern Ethiopia by guerrillas of the Oromo Liberation Front, an ally of the mainstream rebel movement that captured Addis Ababa last week.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | From Associated Press
A transitional government made up of former rebel groups was formed Friday to prepare Ethiopia's first democratic elections, but secessionist Eritrean leaders refused to join the alliance. The government, which is dominated by guerrillas who toppled former President Mengistu Haile Mariam in late May, inherits an empty treasury, heavy debts and the problem of feeding as many as 7 million famine victims.
OPINION
December 18, 2005 | Mike Clough, Michael Clough has worked on U.S. Africa policy for nearly three decades. Most recently, he was the Africa advocacy director for Human Rights Watch.
ETHIOPIA IS edging toward renewed conflict with Eritrea that could result in tens of thousands of deaths and spark a civil war that would claim many more lives. But the Bush administration, a strong supporter of Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, appears to have neither the vision nor the will to avert catastrophe. It would not be the first time Africans died because U.S. policymakers failed to recognize the dangers of backing a ruthless, doomed regime.
NEWS
July 20, 1986 | BLAINE HARDEN, Washington Post
An article of faith behind the Ethiopians government's famine resettlement scheme is that southwestern Ethiopia, where famine victims are sent to rebuild their lives, offers plenty of fertile, empty land. Those who have escaped from the program, which has been temporarily suspended by Ethiopia because of international pressure, said in a refugee camp here, however, that while southwest Ethiopia is fertile, it is not empty.
NEWS
May 29, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An army of youthful and remarkably disciplined rebel soldiers was in full military command of this capital Tuesday, and in London agreement was reached under U.S. mediation for the rebels to rule the country until a new provisional government is formed. Troops of the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF) took control of Addis Ababa after a dawn assault that found the city almost entirely undefended by government forces. The anxiety of the city's 2.
NEWS
May 28, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebel forces moved into this capital city at dawn today, with a coordinated assault on the presidential palace, the international airport and other strategic points. Within hours, the rebels claimed they had taken over the capital, Reuters news service reported. The shooting broke out about 5:30 a.m. Rebel tanks moved up the hill in front of the palace and quickly scored a hit on the compound's ammunition dump, which was still burning two hours later.
NEWS
February 11, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any unwitting observers who happened upon a public ceremony in a stadium near here recently could be forgiven for thinking they had strayed across the border into another country. Speaker after speaker evoked the name of the "Nation of Oromia," and the highlight was the presentation of degrees to 250 people who had just concluded a three-month course in Oromo history and language.
NEWS
June 1, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With its capital operating in a near-normal atmosphere for the time being, Ethiopia's new government began Friday to turn its attention to the country's most dire problem--the famine menacing as many as 7 million of its citizens and refugees. Relief operations here all but ceased as the country's military and government crisis climaxed with the flight of longtime dictator Mengistu Haile Mariam on May 21 and the subsequent collapse of his Marxist government.
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