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Orphan Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2009 | Rachel Abramowitz
From "Rosemary's Baby" to "The Bad Seed" to "The Omen," demon children have long been a staple of horror films. Just don't call them orphans. Warner Bros.' new horror film "Orphan" -- which debuts July 24 -- has sparked outrage from the adoption community, which says it promotes negative stereotypes about orphans. In this latest incarnation of the perennial paranoia, a middle-class family adopts an eerie 9-year-old girl who wreaks havoc on their lives. The film has also sparked a 4,145-member Facebook group called "I Am Boycotting Warner Bros.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2009 | Rachel Abramowitz
From "Rosemary's Baby" to "The Bad Seed" to "The Omen," demon children have long been a staple of horror films. Just don't call them orphans. Warner Bros.' new horror film "Orphan" -- which debuts July 24 -- has sparked outrage from the adoption community, which says it promotes negative stereotypes about orphans. In this latest incarnation of the perennial paranoia, a middle-class family adopts an eerie 9-year-old girl who wreaks havoc on their lives. The film has also sparked a 4,145-member Facebook group called "I Am Boycotting Warner Bros.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1998 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battle to buy the first commercial discovery of the 1998 Cannes International Film Festival began quietly enough. No one had seen "Waking Ned," a comedy made with no movie stars by a British first-time writer-director, before its first screening on Monday afternoon. The 33-year-old filmmaker, Kirk Jones, had just driven the print down from London--a 15-hour trip--because plane tickets were too expensive. He didn't even have any promotional posters.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1998 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battle to buy the first commercial discovery of the 1998 Cannes International Film Festival began quietly enough. No one had seen "Waking Ned," a comedy made with no movie stars by a British first-time writer-director, before its first screening on Monday afternoon. The 33-year-old filmmaker, Kirk Jones, had just driven the print down from London--a 15-hour trip--because plane tickets were too expensive. He didn't even have any promotional posters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1985
From orphan to movie actor in less than a month. Pretty good for a 300-pounder with a long, ugly snout. A nameless male alligator, abandoned by his owner in a Chatsworth warehouse nearly three weeks ago, was adopted this week by Jim Brockett, a Pasadena trainer who specializes in providing animals for films and television.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1998 | Kenneth Turan, Kenneth Turan is the Times' film critic
'One of these days," wised-up shoplifter Barbara Stanwyck says to prosecutor Fred MacMurray as he offers her a drink she assumes is meant to seduce, "one of you boys is going to start one of these scenes differently, and one of us girls is going to drop dead from surprise." Preston Sturges, who wrote that line in "Remember the Night" and hundreds of others in dozens of films, was preeminently the boy who started scenes differently. Words intoxicated him, and he knew just how to make them jump.
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