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Orphans China

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2008 | Susan King
A decade ago, director Roger Spottiswoode read James MacManus' screenplay for "The Children of Huang Shi." He became obsessed with bringing the period drama to the big screen. And his interest never wavered, though it took him eight years to begin filming in China. The movie opens here Friday. "We developed it for four years and weren't able to get it going," says Spottiswoode, whose credits include "Under Fire" and "Tomorrow Never Dies."
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2008 | Susan King
A decade ago, director Roger Spottiswoode read James MacManus' screenplay for "The Children of Huang Shi." He became obsessed with bringing the period drama to the big screen. And his interest never wavered, though it took him eight years to begin filming in China. The movie opens here Friday. "We developed it for four years and weren't able to get it going," says Spottiswoode, whose credits include "Under Fire" and "Tomorrow Never Dies."
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WORLD
June 2, 2013 | By Jung-yoon Choi
SEOUL - Laos is coming under increasing international criticism for its unusual decision to turn over to the North Korean government nine defectors, most of them homeless teenagers. The young North Koreans were arrested by Laotian authorities May 10 just across the border from southwestern China, in Laos' Oudomxay province. Also arrested were two South Korean missionaries who had been helping the North Koreans in an attempt to reach South Korea. "We have received credible information that the nine young North Korean defectors were subsequently returned to [North Korea]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1986 | NIKI CERVANTES, United Press International
The child stares at you with pleading eyes. As the camera zooms in for a close-up, it's easy to see why. He's starving: another victim of famine-plagued Ethiopia. It's wrenching, this television "documentary." But it is also the key to success that has turned its producer, Monrovia-based World Vision International, into something of an overnight star.
WORLD
August 23, 2009 | John M. Glionna
A clandestine network that helps North Koreans escape through China has gone deeper underground because of fears over what authorities in both countries have learned from the capture of two U.S. journalists who were released by Pyongyang this month, a missionary said today. When they were arrested in March, Laura Ling and Euna Lee were reporting on an underground railroad that has helped thousands of people escape from North Korea. "Their arrest reverberated through the aid network," said Tim Peters, a missionary in Seoul who oversees aid work in northeast China.
NEWS
February 7, 1996 | JOHN BOUDREAU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joy filled Barbara Langstaff's heart the January day Chinese adoption officials faxed her a photo of the baby girl she and her husband would adopt. "It was something to hold on to," she says. "I was high for about an hour. "Then I got a message on the Internet. It said something had been posted that China was closed to adoptions because of the brouhaha. My heart just fell." The Internet rumor that China had ended foreign adoptions turned out to be false.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2007 | William Georgiades, Special to The Times
"You can only do so many skinny pretty-boy roles," declares Jonathan Rhys Meyers in a downtown New York cafe. He's just come from a taping of "Live With Regis and Kelly," where he was interviewed by guest host Vince Vaughn. "I decided I had to become more masculine and move away from all those young man roles. I'm 30 now. And the very best roles for actors come between the ages of 30 and 50. And I want to be ready for them all."
NEWS
July 1, 1986 | ANDREW HORVAT, Times Staff Writer
The last time Mieko Akiyama saw her brother Yosuke was on Aug. 13, 1945, when they were among the Japanese settlers fleeing in horse-drawn carts from Soviet troops in northern China. Suddenly, out of the mist, Soviet tanks opened fire. Mieko and her mother fled into the hills. Yosuke, who was 6 years old at the time, wandered alone for a month before reaching a refugee camp and being returned to Japan.
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