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Orson Bean

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1998 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
In a holiday season in which theatrical offerings include such big-budget productions as South Coast Rep's perennial "A Christmas Carol," the Old Globe's new "How the Grinch Stole Christmas!" as well as the upcoming Radio City Christmas Spectacular at Universal Amphitheatre, many smaller theaters are presenting alternative interpretations of the Christmas spirit. * Orson Bean commences his portrayal of Scrooge in "A Christmas Carol" with a double-take and a drum beat.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
May 16, 2009 | Debra Prinzing
Orson Bean, veteran actor and longtime resident of Venice's canal district, has a thing for Americana, especially old restaurant and retail signs that he sees as folk art. "It's really just pop culture," he says. "Advertising has always been part show biz." Oversized and retro, Bean's signs are well suited for the endless scale of blue sky and sunshine overhead. Their very presence brings out the storyteller in him.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1998 | ROBIN RAUZI
Venetian Life: My wife, Alley Mills, and I live on the canals in Venice in a couple of old houses joined together with a glass walkway. I love to just sit out on the canals and hear the ducks quack, and read. Venice is one of the few places founded for pleasure, not commerce, and I just love that it's kept that feeling. There are battles between the developers and the old hippies--but there are still enough old hippies around to make it interesting.
REAL ESTATE
June 13, 1999 | RUTH RYON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For actor Orson Bean, the kitchen is the place to be. For years, he had noticed that the kitchen is where everybody hangs out when there is a party, and Bean has always liked a good party. And, so, soon after he married actress Alley Mills, they built a kitchen large enough for a grand piano--large enough, in fact, to be a house. That's because before the kitchen became a kitchen, it was a house.
NEWS
September 17, 1993 | JANICE ARKATOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Janice Arkatov writes regularly about theater for The Times
David Doyle is going home again. Twenty-nine years ago, he played the youngest of a group of old cronies in the Broadway premiere of Edwin O'Connor's "I Was Dancing." Now he's back with the play, directing the West Coast premiere, opening Saturday at the Richard Basehart Playhouse in Woodland Hills. "It's beautifully written, funny, poignant--and yet it has a lot of starch," Doyle said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1991 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a time in New York City in the mid-'50s when Orson Bean, whose musical play "Waiting for Phil" is playing at the Burbage Theater through Sunday, was about as hot as you could get. Not Elvis hot, but the next best thing. He was house comedian at the famed Blue Angel six months out of the year. Onstage, he played "John Murray Anderson's Almanac."
REAL ESTATE
June 13, 1999 | RUTH RYON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For actor Orson Bean, the kitchen is the place to be. For years, he had noticed that the kitchen is where everybody hangs out when there is a party, and Bean has always liked a good party. And, so, soon after he married actress Alley Mills, they built a kitchen large enough for a grand piano--large enough, in fact, to be a house. That's because before the kitchen became a kitchen, it was a house.
HOME & GARDEN
May 16, 2009 | Debra Prinzing
Orson Bean, veteran actor and longtime resident of Venice's canal district, has a thing for Americana, especially old restaurant and retail signs that he sees as folk art. "It's really just pop culture," he says. "Advertising has always been part show biz." Oversized and retro, Bean's signs are well suited for the endless scale of blue sky and sunshine overhead. Their very presence brings out the storyteller in him.
NEWS
May 23, 1985
Charlie Dugdale, veteran radio announcer and television actor, died Saturday at St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank of leukemia at age 61. Dugdale at his death was a staff announcer at KCBS-TV in Los Angeles, where he was heard on such shows as "Scholar Quiz," "Orson Bean and Other People" and "So You Think You Know L.A.?" He moved to KCBS in 1965 from his hometown of Lincoln, Neb.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1991 | RAY LOYND and * "Waiting for Phil," Burbage Theatre, 2330 Sawtelle Blvd., West Los Angeles. Thursdays-Saturdays, 8:30 p.m., Sundays, 7:30 p.m. Ends Oct. 13. $12-$15; (213) 478-0897. Running time: 1 hour, 40 minutes.
Performer-humorist Orson Bean, stomping his foot for the union label, has created a musical-dramatic paean to the American labor movement that is alternately touching and hokey. "Waiting for Phil" (as in Donahue) charts the efforts of working stiffs in a pizza parlor to win public support for their sit-down strike over driver protests against a 13-minute delivery policy.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1998 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
In a holiday season in which theatrical offerings include such big-budget productions as South Coast Rep's perennial "A Christmas Carol," the Old Globe's new "How the Grinch Stole Christmas!" as well as the upcoming Radio City Christmas Spectacular at Universal Amphitheatre, many smaller theaters are presenting alternative interpretations of the Christmas spirit. * Orson Bean commences his portrayal of Scrooge in "A Christmas Carol" with a double-take and a drum beat.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1998 | ROBIN RAUZI
Venetian Life: My wife, Alley Mills, and I live on the canals in Venice in a couple of old houses joined together with a glass walkway. I love to just sit out on the canals and hear the ducks quack, and read. Venice is one of the few places founded for pleasure, not commerce, and I just love that it's kept that feeling. There are battles between the developers and the old hippies--but there are still enough old hippies around to make it interesting.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1997 | Daryl H. Miller, Daryl H. Miller is a Los Angeles-based theater writer
Orson Bean is laughing with an actor, his back to the stage--unaware that the rest of the cast is standing in place, waiting to rehearse. Since Bean is the director, everyone is on standby until he's ready. "You have to wait for Orson's jokes," his wife, actress Alley Mills, dryly observes. The company laughs in agreement.
NEWS
September 17, 1993 | JANICE ARKATOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Janice Arkatov writes regularly about theater for The Times
David Doyle is going home again. Twenty-nine years ago, he played the youngest of a group of old cronies in the Broadway premiere of Edwin O'Connor's "I Was Dancing." Now he's back with the play, directing the West Coast premiere, opening Saturday at the Richard Basehart Playhouse in Woodland Hills. "It's beautifully written, funny, poignant--and yet it has a lot of starch," Doyle said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1991 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a time in New York City in the mid-'50s when Orson Bean, whose musical play "Waiting for Phil" is playing at the Burbage Theater through Sunday, was about as hot as you could get. Not Elvis hot, but the next best thing. He was house comedian at the famed Blue Angel six months out of the year. Onstage, he played "John Murray Anderson's Almanac."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1991 | RAY LOYND and * "Waiting for Phil," Burbage Theatre, 2330 Sawtelle Blvd., West Los Angeles. Thursdays-Saturdays, 8:30 p.m., Sundays, 7:30 p.m. Ends Oct. 13. $12-$15; (213) 478-0897. Running time: 1 hour, 40 minutes.
Performer-humorist Orson Bean, stomping his foot for the union label, has created a musical-dramatic paean to the American labor movement that is alternately touching and hokey. "Waiting for Phil" (as in Donahue) charts the efforts of working stiffs in a pizza parlor to win public support for their sit-down strike over driver protests against a 13-minute delivery policy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
"I made a decision a few years back to never again do anything professionally that I didn't want to do," announced Orson Bean. "And I've stuck to that. I turned down a TV show ("MacGyver") for a lot of dough 'cause I wanted to do this play." "This play" is Dario Fo's political satire, "Accidental Death of an Anarchist," currently at the Odyssey Theatre under the direction of Ron Sossi.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1997 | Daryl H. Miller, Daryl H. Miller is a Los Angeles-based theater writer
Orson Bean is laughing with an actor, his back to the stage--unaware that the rest of the cast is standing in place, waiting to rehearse. Since Bean is the director, everyone is on standby until he's ready. "You have to wait for Orson's jokes," his wife, actress Alley Mills, dryly observes. The company laughs in agreement.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
"I made a decision a few years back to never again do anything professionally that I didn't want to do," announced Orson Bean. "And I've stuck to that. I turned down a TV show ("MacGyver") for a lot of dough 'cause I wanted to do this play." "This play" is Dario Fo's political satire, "Accidental Death of an Anarchist," currently at the Odyssey Theatre under the direction of Ron Sossi.
NEWS
May 23, 1985
Charlie Dugdale, veteran radio announcer and television actor, died Saturday at St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank of leukemia at age 61. Dugdale at his death was a staff announcer at KCBS-TV in Los Angeles, where he was heard on such shows as "Scholar Quiz," "Orson Bean and Other People" and "So You Think You Know L.A.?" He moved to KCBS in 1965 from his hometown of Lincoln, Neb.
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