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Orson Welles

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2009
'Me and Orson Welles' MPAA rating: PG-13 for sexual references and smoking Running time: 1 hour, 53 minutes Playing: In limited release at the Landmark, West L.A., and the Grove Stadium 14, L.A.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It was lost and now it's found, and the world of Orson Welles enthusiasts, which very much includes me, counts itself grateful and amazed. I am talking about 66 minutes of footage from an endeavor called "Too Much Johnson," which Welles shot in 1938, three years before "Citizen Kane" changed everything. Not only had this material never been seen publicly, it had been presumed gone forever when the villa in Spain where Welles thought it was stored burned down nearly half a century ago. Discovered in a warehouse in Pordenone, Italy, by local film society Cinemazero and beautifully restored via a collaboration between the George Eastman House in Rochester, N.Y., and the National Film Preservation Foundation, "Too Much Johnson" is ready for its Los Angeles close-up.
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OPINION
October 13, 1985
A genius of radio, film and theater, Orson Welles, is dead. There was, as with so many innovators, a meteoric quality to his career, but the dazzling energy survives, illuminating the arts in which he engaged. His extraordinary originality set him apart. The 1938 radio production, "The War of the Worlds," brought to the emerging medium a stark realism that, 47 years later, still influences every serious practitioner.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
"Shogun," "The Winds of War," "Game of Thrones" and "Under the Dome" are just a few titles in the library of highly regarded novels that have been adapted for television. And then there's "The Spoils of Babylon," the sprawling 22-hour miniseries with an all-star cast based on the massive novel by self-proclaimed "undisputed master of dramatic fiction" Eric Jonrosh. Filmed during the 1970s when "novels for television" were all the rage, "The Spoils of Babylon" revolved around the oil-rich Morehouse family and was packed with scenes of betrayal, greed and forbidden love.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2009 | By Roger Moore
Christian McKay didn't like the comparison the first time he heard it. The words "You look a bit like Orson Welles" could send any young actor screaming back to his personal trainer. "It was at RADA [the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art], and I was incredibly upset," the British actor recalls. "My generation remembers the older Orson being interviewed on ' Merv Griffin' and 'Parkinson' [a long-running BBC chat show]. And selling sherry. And being enormous, 350 pounds! I thought anybody seeing a resemblance was having a go at my weight."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Susan King
Orson Welles' long-lost film "Too Much Johnson," which the seminal filmmaker directed two years before coming to Hollywood to make his landmark 1941 drama "Citizen Kane," has been recovered. The announcement was made by the National Film Preservation Foundation,   George Eastman House , the Cineteca del Friuli and Cinemazero . A 35mm nitrate work print of "Too Much Johnson" was recently found in a warehouse in Pordenone, Italy, by staff at Cinemazero, the film exhibition organization that partners with Cineteca del Friuli for the city's annual silent film festival, Le Giornate del Cinema Muto.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS
The American Cinematheque this weekend presents "Orson Welles: The Actor," composed of nine features, three of which Welles also directed. The retrospective begins tonight at 7 with "The Lady From Shanghai" (1948), to be followed at 9 by the double feature "Jane Eyre" (1944) and "The Stranger" (1946). "Prince of Foxes" (1949) and "The Third Man" (1949) will screen Saturday as a double feature commencing at 6 p.m., with "Touch of Evil" (1958) screening at 9:30.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1995 | HENRY JAGLOM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Director Henry Jaglom was a friend of Orson Welles for several years before his death, and also considered Welles a mentor. What follows are excerpts from Jaglom's journal from 1985, from the days surrounding Welles' death on Oct. 11 of that year. Saturday afternoon at lunch, Orson told me that the attacks were beginning to come in, in response to the books recently out on him, especially Barbara Leaming's wonderfully supportive--and to his mind, largely accurate--biography.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2009 | By Saul Austerlitz
There are not one but two legends of Orson Welles, overlapping but contradictory. In the first, a brilliant wunderkind is undermined by studio skulduggery and a certain naiveté, never fulfilling his exorbitant talent; in the second, that same wunderkind is a boozy blowhard who betrays his talent with alcohol, easy pleasures and a fatal lack of artistic rigor. Both bear some resemblance to the director of "Citizen Kane," but alone, neither is enough to convey the vastness of the larger-than-life character.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2009 | By BETSY SHARKEY, Film Critic
"Me and Orson Welles" is a frothy backstage pass, courtesy of director Richard Linklater, to the early days of the great director (that would be Welles) during a stint as the mercurial head of the Mercury Theater Company in 1937. Adapted from Robert Kaplow's novel, the "Me" is a teenager whose coming-of-age story unfolds during the staging of Welles' groundbreaking reimagining of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar as a '30s-era Fascist dictator. The teen in question is Richard Samuels, played by "High School Musical" heartthrob Zac Efron, a senior who slips out of class and into NYC only to get swept up in Welles' retinue, with a small part tossed his way as a bone.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By Susan King
Joan Fontaine may have been overshadowed at times by her older sister, Olivia de Havilland, but the actress -- who died Sunday at age 96 -- appeared in several classic films during the Golden Age of Hollywood and is the only performer to win an Oscar in a film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. It's hard to pick a Fontaine top five because she made several interesting films,  including 1942's "This Above All" with Tyrone Power, 1944's  "Jane Eyre" with Orson Welles, 1953's "Ivanhoe" with Robert Taylor and Elizabeth Taylor, and the Ida Lupino-directed 1953 noir "The Bigamist.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"The Returned" (Sundance Channel, Thursdays) . A French miniseries in eight parts, based on a 2004 film of the same French name ("Les Revenants") but a different English one ("They Came Back"). The word "zombie" is often mentioned in press for the series, in which several characters, deceased, of different ages and dates of death, return to a small French mountain town -- confused but, unlike your average zombie, with their mental faculties intact and physically none the worse for wear.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Susan King
Orson Welles' long-lost film "Too Much Johnson," which the seminal filmmaker directed two years before coming to Hollywood to make his landmark 1941 drama "Citizen Kane," has been recovered. The announcement was made by the National Film Preservation Foundation,   George Eastman House , the Cineteca del Friuli and Cinemazero . A 35mm nitrate work print of "Too Much Johnson" was recently found in a warehouse in Pordenone, Italy, by staff at Cinemazero, the film exhibition organization that partners with Cineteca del Friuli for the city's annual silent film festival, Le Giornate del Cinema Muto.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
Toward the end of his life, Orson Welles and director Henry Jaglom became close in friendship and business. They lunched regularly together at Ma Maison, where the film legend asked Jaglom to tape their unfettered conversations. Thirty years later, film historian Peter Biskind has edited their talks and penned the introduction for "My Lunches With Orson: Conversations Between Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles. " You made those tapes in the early '80s. So why did it take so long to transcribe and publish them?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2013 | By Susan King
Orson Welles' landmark 1938 radio broadcast of H.G. Wells' "The War of the Worlds" didn't need Twitter, Facebook or Google Plus to turn it into a sensation. The then 23-year-old Welles' sheer brilliance and chutzpah were enough for the broadcast to become one of the biggest mass-hysteria events in U.S. history. A new "American Experience" documentary, "The War of the Worlds," airing Oct. 29 on PBS, will examine the pioneering radio broadcast of Oct. 30, 1938. PHOTOS: Hollywood backlot moments "In an era where the public can still be fooled or misled by what is read online, in print, or seen on TV, 'War of the Worlds' is a timely reminder of the power of mass media," executive producer Mark Samels said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | By Susan King
The American Cinematheque and Art Directors Guild Film Society series, "Setting the Scene," continues Sunday at the Aero Theatre in Santa Monica with a screening of Orson Welles' 1958 film noir masterpiece, "Touch of Evil. " Besides screening the restored version of the classic, which stars Welles, Charlton Heston, Janet Leigh, Mercedes McCambridge and Marlene Dietrich, the program will celebrate the career of the film's production designer and ADG 2013 Hall of Fame inductee Robert Clatworthy.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The strangest part of this story may be that in the middle of World War II, 74-year-old British author H.G. Wells took a train to Texas to speak to a meeting of the United States Brewers Assn. I can't quite figure out why he was tapped to speak there; perhaps he simply liked beer. By 1940, Wells had published almost all of his fiction, his fantastical works helped shape science fiction that would come later. Some of his most lasting works, all written before 1900, include "The Time Machine," "The Island of Doctor Moreau," "The Invisible Man" and "The War of the Worlds.
HOME & GARDEN
June 15, 2013 | Chris Erskine
With a pneumatic whoooooooosh , I leave Earth again, and I am not even propelled by the sort of happy hour rocket fuel with which I'm sometimes associated. In truth, I do not have many happy hours. I have happy minutes, happy moments. An entire hour? Only our parents had happy hours, long chunks of the evening devoted to happy juice. By comparison, I'm almost a nun. A manly nun, sure. And on this day, the flying nun. That's what this training glider looks like, that big cockeyed bonnet that Sally Field used to wear back in her "Flying Nun" days.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The strangest part of this story may be that in the middle of World War II, 74-year-old British author H.G. Wells took a train to Texas to speak to a meeting of the United States Brewers Assn. I can't quite figure out why he was tapped to speak there; perhaps he simply liked beer. By 1940, Wells had published almost all of his fiction, his fantastical works helped shape science fiction that would come later. Some of his most lasting works, all written before 1900, include "The Time Machine," "The Island of Doctor Moreau," "The Invisible Man" and "The War of the Worlds.
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