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HEALTH
July 4, 2011 | By Amanda Leigh Mascarelli, HealthKey
Roger Grunwald's acting career has taken him to off-Broadway stages and the set of the soap opera "One Life to Live. " He certainly has reason to smile. But in all seven of his professional headshots, his lips are sealed shut. "Being in the performing arts, a crooked smile doesn't do you any good," says the middle-aged New York City actor. Most distressing was a particular tooth that protruded from his lower jaw. So about three years ago, he went to an orthodontist and got outfitted with braces.
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HEALTH
July 4, 2011 | By Amanda Leigh Mascarelli, HealthKey
Roger Grunwald's acting career has taken him to off-Broadway stages and the set of the soap opera "One Life to Live. " He certainly has reason to smile. But in all seven of his professional headshots, his lips are sealed shut. "Being in the performing arts, a crooked smile doesn't do you any good," says the middle-aged New York City actor. Most distressing was a particular tooth that protruded from his lower jaw. So about three years ago, he went to an orthodontist and got outfitted with braces.
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HEALTH
July 23, 2007 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
Parents, brace yourselves. If you had your child's prominent front teeth treated in two stages -- early, then again in adolescence -- it likely wasn't any more effective than having it done in one fell swoop at adolescence. In an analysis of data from eight studies that included 592 patients from five countries who had been treated for prominent front teeth, Kevin O'Brien, a professor of orthodontics at the University of Manchester in England, and lead author Jayne Harrison, a U.K.
HEALTH
July 23, 2007 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
Parents, brace yourselves. If you had your child's prominent front teeth treated in two stages -- early, then again in adolescence -- it likely wasn't any more effective than having it done in one fell swoop at adolescence. In an analysis of data from eight studies that included 592 patients from five countries who had been treated for prominent front teeth, Kevin O'Brien, a professor of orthodontics at the University of Manchester in England, and lead author Jayne Harrison, a U.K.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1996 | TIM MAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Now, she needs braces. The little Palmdale girl who spent nearly eight years of her life without a smile because of a congenital birth defect, then underwent about 24 hours of painstaking plastic surgeries and three operations--one of which was aborted at the last minute because of a fever blister--to correct the condition, is finally able to visibly vent her joy, bliss, delight, jubilation and euphoria. But now, her parents noticed that her teeth are crooked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1996
Now she needs braces. The Palmdale girl who spent nearly eight years of her life unable to smile because of a congenital birth defect and underwent three operations to correct the condition is finally able to visibly express her joy. But now, her parents noticed that her teeth are crooked. "Now that she can smile, you can really tell she needs braces," Lori Thomas said.
NEWS
May 17, 1994 | KATHLEEN O. RYAN
* Orthodontic treatment must begin with a healthy mouth. See a dentist to make sure everything is in good shape. * Older patients take longer to heal, so they should think long and hard about treatments that include major jaw surgery. * Patients taking special medications need to let the orthodontist know beforehand because certain medications can interfere with movement of the teeth.
HEALTH
April 12, 1999
A practicing orthodontist, I was interested in your article regarding my profession ("A Controversy That Has Real Teeth to It," April 5, by Marnell Jameson). As noted, an area of much disagreement between orthodontists is the first phase of the two-phase treatment referred to in the article. In my office, the purpose of the first phase is to minimize the need for a second phase. Therefore, it is important that prospective patients ask for the maximum fee for both stages. This would discourage the tendency by an orthodontist to do little in the first phase, be paid disproportionately, then require a hefty fee for the second phase.
NEWS
July 28, 1987 | DAVID LARSEN, Times Staff Writer
Brace yourself. The tin grin is gone, and in its place is a gem of an idea. Gone for the modern orthodontic patient are cumbersome metal braces; the latest are made of clear, manufactured sapphire. They were introduced recently by a division of Johnson & Johnson, after having undergone tests for more than a year by 20 doctors around the world. At its "A"-Company Inc.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1991 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suppose you want your teeth straightened. First, your orthodontist takes some X-rays of your mouth, then explains how various kinds of braces might be used, what your teeth ultimately would look like and how much it would cost. Any questions? Yes, says Dolphin Imaging Systems Inc. The Valencia company says dental patients are increasingly asking whether the X-rays expose them to unnecessary doses of radiation.
HEALTH
April 12, 1999
A practicing orthodontist, I was interested in your article regarding my profession ("A Controversy That Has Real Teeth to It," April 5, by Marnell Jameson). As noted, an area of much disagreement between orthodontists is the first phase of the two-phase treatment referred to in the article. In my office, the purpose of the first phase is to minimize the need for a second phase. Therefore, it is important that prospective patients ask for the maximum fee for both stages. This would discourage the tendency by an orthodontist to do little in the first phase, be paid disproportionately, then require a hefty fee for the second phase.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1996 | TIM MAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Now, she needs braces. The little Palmdale girl who spent nearly eight years of her life without a smile because of a congenital birth defect, then underwent about 24 hours of painstaking plastic surgeries and three operations--one of which was aborted at the last minute because of a fever blister--to correct the condition, is finally able to visibly vent her joy, bliss, delight, jubilation and euphoria. But now, her parents noticed that her teeth are crooked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1996
Now she needs braces. The Palmdale girl who spent nearly eight years of her life unable to smile because of a congenital birth defect and underwent three operations to correct the condition is finally able to visibly express her joy. But now, her parents noticed that her teeth are crooked. "Now that she can smile, you can really tell she needs braces," Lori Thomas said.
NEWS
May 17, 1994 | KATHLEEN O. RYAN
* Orthodontic treatment must begin with a healthy mouth. See a dentist to make sure everything is in good shape. * Older patients take longer to heal, so they should think long and hard about treatments that include major jaw surgery. * Patients taking special medications need to let the orthodontist know beforehand because certain medications can interfere with movement of the teeth.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1991 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suppose you want your teeth straightened. First, your orthodontist takes some X-rays of your mouth, then explains how various kinds of braces might be used, what your teeth ultimately would look like and how much it would cost. Any questions? Yes, says Dolphin Imaging Systems Inc. The Valencia company says dental patients are increasingly asking whether the X-rays expose them to unnecessary doses of radiation.
NEWS
July 28, 1987 | DAVID LARSEN, Times Staff Writer
Brace yourself. The tin grin is gone, and in its place is a gem of an idea. Gone for the modern orthodontic patient are cumbersome metal braces; the latest are made of clear, manufactured sapphire. They were introduced recently by a division of Johnson & Johnson, after having undergone tests for more than a year by 20 doctors around the world. At its "A"-Company Inc.
HEALTH
December 20, 2013 | By Emily Dwass
When my son and daughter were youngsters, once a year I'd have a disagreement with their pediatric dentist. He wanted to do routine annual X-rays, and I would protest because neither child ever had any cavities. His response: Dental X-rays are an important diagnostic tool, representing a small speck in the sea of radiation that we receive by inhabiting planet Earth. It turns out we both were right. Dental X-rays are essential for detecting serious oral and systemic health problems, and generally the amount of radiation is very low. But new thinking on dental X-rays is that the "one size fits all" schedule is outdated.
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