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Orthodontics

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NEWS
May 17, 1994 | KATHLEEN O. RYAN
* Orthodontic treatment must begin with a healthy mouth. See a dentist to make sure everything is in good shape. * Older patients take longer to heal, so they should think long and hard about treatments that include major jaw surgery. * Patients taking special medications need to let the orthodontist know beforehand because certain medications can interfere with movement of the teeth.
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HEALTH
July 4, 2011 | By Amanda Leigh Mascarelli, HealthKey
Roger Grunwald's acting career has taken him to off-Broadway stages and the set of the soap opera "One Life to Live. " He certainly has reason to smile. But in all seven of his professional headshots, his lips are sealed shut. "Being in the performing arts, a crooked smile doesn't do you any good," says the middle-aged New York City actor. Most distressing was a particular tooth that protruded from his lower jaw. So about three years ago, he went to an orthodontist and got outfitted with braces.
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HEALTH
July 4, 2011 | By Amanda Leigh Mascarelli, HealthKey
Roger Grunwald's acting career has taken him to off-Broadway stages and the set of the soap opera "One Life to Live. " He certainly has reason to smile. But in all seven of his professional headshots, his lips are sealed shut. "Being in the performing arts, a crooked smile doesn't do you any good," says the middle-aged New York City actor. Most distressing was a particular tooth that protruded from his lower jaw. So about three years ago, he went to an orthodontist and got outfitted with braces.
HEALTH
July 23, 2007 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
Parents, brace yourselves. If you had your child's prominent front teeth treated in two stages -- early, then again in adolescence -- it likely wasn't any more effective than having it done in one fell swoop at adolescence. In an analysis of data from eight studies that included 592 patients from five countries who had been treated for prominent front teeth, Kevin O'Brien, a professor of orthodontics at the University of Manchester in England, and lead author Jayne Harrison, a U.K.
NEWS
May 17, 1994 | KATHLEEN O. RYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After a year of wearing braces, Bill Bates was ready to get those puppies off. He had spent all of 1991 sporting the latest hip-colored elastic ligatures on his braces--red, white and blue in support of U.S. troops in Operation Desert Storm. Now it was time to take off the tinsel--braces that had taken him five years to get after finally convincing Scott Bates that he was dead serious about having his teeth straightened. Why the tough sell? Bill, at the time, was a 75-year-old retiree.
HEALTH
April 5, 1999 | MARNELL JAMESON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Remember when braces went hand in hand with pimples? Kids got them at about the same awkward time. Well, today's generation of youths destined for braces is more likely to get them while the tooth fairy is still leaving them money. And they'll likely get them twice. In the jargon of dentistry, it's called "two-phase orthodontia," which means you get dental hardware twice, once in early grade school and again in middle school.
HEALTH
January 29, 2007 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
Getting a mouthful of hardware designed to straighten the teeth is a rite of passage for almost 3 in 10 American children. But a new study suggests these kids do not come out happier for it once they grow into adulthood. Parents and patients often hear orthodontists tout the improved confidence and self-esteem that will come from correcting misalignments of the teeth and jaw.
HEALTH
July 23, 2007 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
Parents, brace yourselves. If you had your child's prominent front teeth treated in two stages -- early, then again in adolescence -- it likely wasn't any more effective than having it done in one fell swoop at adolescence. In an analysis of data from eight studies that included 592 patients from five countries who had been treated for prominent front teeth, Kevin O'Brien, a professor of orthodontics at the University of Manchester in England, and lead author Jayne Harrison, a U.K.
HEALTH
December 8, 1997 | HELEN UBINAS, THE HARTFORD COURANT
Braces have long transcended adolescent geekdom to become "mouth jewelry," "cool" and, claims a write-up in the twentysomething magazine Jane, "so human." In fact, in the past five years or so, when kids cried in the orthodontist's chair, it wasn't because they needed braces but because they didn't. "I've had kids be so disappointed when I tell them they have perfect teeth," said Dr. Monica Cipes, a West Hartford, Conn., pediatric dentist.
HEALTH
February 2, 2004 | Valerie Ulene, Special to The Times
Thirty years ago, only middle school and high school students wore braces on their teeth; today, it's not unusual to see kids as young as 7 or 8 with them. Driving the trend are orthodontists who say that starting treatment earlier can prevent more complicated problems. Others, however, recommend delaying or withholding therapy until most, if not all, of the permanent teeth are in place. For parents, such conflicting advice can be confusing. Jehan Agrama of Los Angeles can attest to that.
HEALTH
January 29, 2007 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
Getting a mouthful of hardware designed to straighten the teeth is a rite of passage for almost 3 in 10 American children. But a new study suggests these kids do not come out happier for it once they grow into adulthood. Parents and patients often hear orthodontists tout the improved confidence and self-esteem that will come from correcting misalignments of the teeth and jaw.
HEALTH
February 2, 2004 | Valerie Ulene, Special to The Times
Thirty years ago, only middle school and high school students wore braces on their teeth; today, it's not unusual to see kids as young as 7 or 8 with them. Driving the trend are orthodontists who say that starting treatment earlier can prevent more complicated problems. Others, however, recommend delaying or withholding therapy until most, if not all, of the permanent teeth are in place. For parents, such conflicting advice can be confusing. Jehan Agrama of Los Angeles can attest to that.
HEALTH
October 28, 2002 | Benedict Carey, Times Staff Writer
A life on camera will expose even the most subtle imperfections in appearance, as Renee Spei knows. An actress who does work in film, TV and voice-over, she saw her face on screen several years ago and noticed something she hadn't before. Her smile wasn't right. Once pristine as pearls, her front two teeth now overlapped a bit; several in the lower row leaned and bunched together. "I don't think I lost any jobs because of it, but you never know," she said. "It was bugging me.
HEALTH
April 12, 1999
A practicing orthodontist, I was interested in your article regarding my profession ("A Controversy That Has Real Teeth to It," April 5, by Marnell Jameson). As noted, an area of much disagreement between orthodontists is the first phase of the two-phase treatment referred to in the article. In my office, the purpose of the first phase is to minimize the need for a second phase. Therefore, it is important that prospective patients ask for the maximum fee for both stages. This would discourage the tendency by an orthodontist to do little in the first phase, be paid disproportionately, then require a hefty fee for the second phase.
HEALTH
April 5, 1999 | MARNELL JAMESON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Remember when braces went hand in hand with pimples? Kids got them at about the same awkward time. Well, today's generation of youths destined for braces is more likely to get them while the tooth fairy is still leaving them money. And they'll likely get them twice. In the jargon of dentistry, it's called "two-phase orthodontia," which means you get dental hardware twice, once in early grade school and again in middle school.
HEALTH
December 8, 1997 | HELEN UBINAS, THE HARTFORD COURANT
Braces have long transcended adolescent geekdom to become "mouth jewelry," "cool" and, claims a write-up in the twentysomething magazine Jane, "so human." In fact, in the past five years or so, when kids cried in the orthodontist's chair, it wasn't because they needed braces but because they didn't. "I've had kids be so disappointed when I tell them they have perfect teeth," said Dr. Monica Cipes, a West Hartford, Conn., pediatric dentist.
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some might find it hard to swallow, but retainers--yes, those ugly acrylic things that stick to the roof of your mouth and hold your straightened teeth in place--are making fashion statements. Once retainers were made of plain, gum-colored plastic. Now they come in colors such as purple, lime and orange as well as glow-in-the-dark and neon shades. "We've even had some done in school colors. I'm a USC alum, and I've done several USC retainers," says Steven Wynn, a Newport Beach orthodontist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1996 | TIM MAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Now, she needs braces. The little Palmdale girl who spent nearly eight years of her life without a smile because of a congenital birth defect, then underwent about 24 hours of painstaking plastic surgeries and three operations--one of which was aborted at the last minute because of a fever blister--to correct the condition, is finally able to visibly vent her joy, bliss, delight, jubilation and euphoria. But now, her parents noticed that her teeth are crooked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1996 | TIM MAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Now, she needs braces. The little Palmdale girl who spent nearly eight years of her life without a smile because of a congenital birth defect, then underwent about 24 hours of painstaking plastic surgeries and three operations--one of which was aborted at the last minute because of a fever blister--to correct the condition, is finally able to visibly vent her joy, bliss, delight, jubilation and euphoria. But now, her parents noticed that her teeth are crooked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1996
Now she needs braces. The Palmdale girl who spent nearly eight years of her life unable to smile because of a congenital birth defect and underwent three operations to correct the condition is finally able to visibly express her joy. But now, her parents noticed that her teeth are crooked. "Now that she can smile, you can really tell she needs braces," Lori Thomas said.
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