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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1996 | JOHN DART
Thousands of Eastern Orthodox parishioners will circle their churches tonight before midnight, remembering the biblical accounts of Jesus' followers making their way to his tomb. Then, entering the darkened church interiors with lighted candles in hand, worshipers will gradually illuminate the buildings and the Resurrection will be celebrated in ancient Easter liturgies that remain remarkably similar today--despite derivations from various eastern Mediterranean and Slavic countries.
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WORLD
April 18, 2014 | By Maher Abukhater
JERUSALEM - Thousands of Christian pilgrims from all over the world filled the narrow streets of the Old City of Jerusalem on Good Friday to celebrate on the site they believe Jesus was crucified and buried over 2,000 years ago. The pilgrims gathered near the fourth station on Via Dolorosa, the street down which Jesus is believed to have walked on the way to his Crucifixion. Then they followed his path through that narrow alley toward the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, where they believe Jesus was crucified and buried.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2008 | Tracy Wilkinson and Paul Tugwell, Special to The Times
Archbishop Christodoulos, the head of Greece's Orthodox Church, who welcomed rapprochement with the Vatican and revitalized his congregation but was criticized for meddling in politics and government, died early Monday. He was 69. A charismatic nationalist and his country's supreme religious authority for the last decade, Christodoulos died at his home in Athens after a seven-month battle with cancer, church officials said.
NEWS
December 11, 2013 | By Michael McGough
As pro-Western and pro-Russian Ukrainians battle over the future orientation of their country, there is a world figure who could offer an important symbolic gift to European-minded Ukrainians: Pope Francis. Stalin supposedly dismissed the importance of the Roman Catholic Church by asking: “How many divisions does the pope have?” But before and after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia has kept a wary eye on the Vatican's activities, particularly in connection with the former Soviet Socialist Republic of Ukraine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2007
Patriarch Teoctist, 92, the head of the Romanian Orthodox Church, who made history when he invited then-Pope John Paul II to his country in 1999 but also was criticized for being too close to former communists, died Monday of a heart attack after prostate surgery at a Bucharest hospital. Teoctist was appointed to head the church in November 1986 but briefly stepped down in 1989 after anti-communist protesters said he had been too conciliatory toward former dictator Nicolae Ceausescu.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1999 | BRENDA LOREE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Of Christianity's three major divisions--Roman Catholic, Protestant and Eastern Orthodoxy--the latter is the least well-known and least practiced in the United States. But Oxnard supports two Orthodox churches: Holy Trinity Eastern Orthodox Church in El Rio and St. Herman Orthodox Church in America on Wooley Road. Each church attracts about 30 worshipers from throughout the county at Sunday services, both of which are at 10 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1986
Eastern Orthodox faithful--Christians of mostly Greek, Russian, Eastern European and Eastern Mediterranean heritage--will culminate Holy Week celebrations tonight with a Resurrection Service starting before midnight and lasting into the early morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1998 | Religion News Service
The Bulgarian Orthodox Church has announced that it will withdraw from the World Council of Churches, the Geneva-based international ecumenical body, citing the organization's style and direction. "We have no intention of ending ecumenical church contacts or cutting links with other Christian organizations," a spokesman for the Bulgarian church told Ecumenical News International, the Geneva-based religious news agency.
NEWS
December 7, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid new signs of strain between Roman Catholics and other Christian faiths, the Vatican's secretary of state on Friday defended moves by Pope John Paul II to restore his church's influence in the Soviet Union and the formerly Communist lands of Eastern Europe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1998 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Biola University, a conservative Christian college that teaches biblical literalism, has ended a nine-month investigation into the religious beliefs of four Eastern Orthodox staff members and will recommend that their jobs be spared.
WORLD
August 20, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
HELWAN, Egypt - The gunmen sped past on motorcycles and in a car, firing automatic weapons and hurling gasoline bombs. Parishioners ran for cover as bullets chipped the stone and rattled the metal doors of St. George's Church. Adel Samir hasn't slept since Friday's attack. A mechanic, he now guards the church south of Cairo. The street out front has been barricaded. Other men, tattooed with the cross, wield clubs and patrol the perimeter amid yellow dust rising from cement factories along the Nile.
WORLD
August 17, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - The face of dissent in Russia was once that of the outcast intellectual such as Nobel laureates Andrei Sakharov and Alexander Solzhenitsyn. Then it was the oligarch who grew rich in the post-Soviet chaos and used his wealth to challenge the Kremlin. The torch was passed again on Friday. A Moscow court convicted three young punk rockers, members of the provocatively named group Pussy Riot, of "premeditated hooliganism" and sentenced them to two years in prison. The crime: a February "punk prayer" at Moscow's Christ the Savior Cathedral in which the balaclava-clad, mini-skirted rockers appealed for the downfall of President Vladimir Putin.
WORLD
April 23, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW — Tens of thousands of people came to the square in front of a Moscow cathedral Sunday in a show of support for the Russian Orthodox Church, which is facing criticism for its close ties to the Kremlin and the wealth of its leaders. Under golden cupolas and a warm spring sun, church leaders dressed in red-and-gold robes carried crosses and icons around the mighty white walls of Christ the Savior Cathedral in a procession led by Patriarch Kirill. "What are we doing, my dears, here today, having gathered in such a multitude?"
WORLD
April 22, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
KARABANOVO, Russia - His unruly mane of white hair giving him the look of Moses, Father Georgy Edelstein struggled over the grayish snow that is the late-spring landscape of this barren village, heading to his church for Good Friday services. When he got to its small, darkened main hall, the 79-year-old put a simple silver cross over his robes and began saying prayers on one of the holiest days in the Russian Orthodox Church. His audience: his assistant and one villager. Two days later, the leader of the Russian Orthodox Church, Patriarch Kirill, exchanged hearty Easter kisses with President-elect Vladimir Putin amid the lavish interiors of Moscow's Christ the Savior Cathedral, his jewel-encrusted cross and gold brocade robe shining in the television limelight.
WORLD
March 18, 2012 | By Amro Hassan, Los Angeles Times
Millions of Coptic Christians turned out across Egypt on Sunday to mourn Pope Shenouda III and reflect on the sharpening tensions Christians here face as Islamists have risen in power since last year's overthrow of President Hosni Mubarak. Shenouda, who died Saturday at age 88, led the Coptic Orthodox Church for more than 40 years. He was looked upon as a spiritual, social and sometimes political leader who guarded the rights of Egypt's minority Christian population in a region prone to religious animosities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
  Pope Shenouda III, the charismatic patriarch of the Coptic Orthodox Church whose shrewd grasp of religion and politics guided Egypt's Christians through deepening animosities with Muslims, died Saturday. He was 88. The state news agency reported that Shenouda, who led the church for four decades, had struggled with respiratory and liver ailments. There was no announcement about a successor. A stately figure with a flowing gray beard, the pope had attempted in recent months to buttressEgypt'sestimated 9 million Copts against persecution from Islamists following the revolution that overthrew former President Hosni Mubarak.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1999 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
With flickering candles and ancient chants, millions of Orthodox Christians in Southern California and the world today celebrate Christmas. "Peace from God! Christ is born!" is the exclamation heard in Serbian Orthodox churches. In Armenian parishes, water was blessed Wednesday and drunk by the faithful as a sign of the cleansing of their hearts and minds as they observed both the birth and baptism of Jesus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1999 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
He has stirred the Orthodox Church with a vision that is simultaneously bold and progressive yet peaceful and pure. He now preaches fervently to more than 5 million followers, warning them against becoming slaves to materialism and urging a struggle to preserve morality. Parts of his vision, which includes uniting the many long-separate Orthodox churches, are explosive for many in that world. But Ignatius IV, patriarch of Antioch and all the East, has never been one to hold back.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2011 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
The J. Paul Getty Trust failed Thursday to derail a lawsuit by the Armenian Orthodox Church that accuses the museum of harboring stolen illuminated medieval manuscripts — 755-year-old works that are masterpieces and, to the church, spiritually and historically sacred. After a brief hearing, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Abraham Khan denied the Getty's motion to dismiss the claim. The museum's attorneys argued that the deadline for filing the suit had passed decades ago under the statute of limitations.
WORLD
January 28, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
Metropolitan Kirill, a prominent and politically astute priest with a reputation as a modernizer, was elected patriarch of the Russian Orthodox Church on Tuesday. With his enthronement Sunday, Kirill will become the first patriarch inducted since the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991. He takes charge at a time when the Russian Orthodox Church enjoys wealth and political influence unmatched since the days of czarist Russia.
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