Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOsama
IN THE NEWS

Osama

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
May 3, 2011
The dramatic killing of Osama bin Laden after a 40-minute gun battle in a Pakistani hill station mansion is, as President Obama rightly said, a triumph of justice. It is a symbolic and historic milestone in the war on terror, marking the end of a frustrating, decade-long manhunt. By continuing to pursue Bin Laden years after 9/11, the United States sought to demonstrate that it has staying power and won't be outlasted by its enemies, including Bin Laden and his successors. That's an important message from a country with a reputation for losing interest in its overseas entanglements before they are fully resolved.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
March 26, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- In a quick decision, a jury convicted Osama bin Laden's son-in-law of conspiring to kill Americans in his role as the angry voice of Al Qaeda after the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Sulaiman abu Ghaith, 48, faces life in prison when he is sentenced Sept. 8. The case has given the public its first and possibly only chance to watch a terrorism trial related to the 2001 attacks unfold in civilian court. Unlike other high-profile terrorism suspects accused of crimes arising from the attacks, Abu Ghaith bypassed the U.S. military prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, after his arrest last year.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
September 5, 2012 | By David Horsey
Republicans not only have to compete with the star power of Michelle Obama, it just may be that they have set a trap for themselves by making the central question of the 2012 presidential campaign, "Are you better off now than you were four years ago?" At their convention in Charlotte, N.C., this week, the Democrats, from the first lady on down, are responding to that question with some pretty sharp answers. Here's the most succinct one: "GM is alive and Osama bin Laden is dead. " It's a great bumper sticker line and has the added advantage of deeper resonance.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - Jurors on Tuesday begin deliberating the fate of a former Al Qaeda spokesman portrayed by lawyers as either a hardened terrorist buoyed by the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks or an innocent cleric accidentally drawn into Osama bin Laden's orbit. The case of Sulaiman abu Ghaith, a son-in-law of Bin Laden, has given the public its first and possibly only chance to watch a terrorism trial related to the 2001 attacks unfold in civilian court. Unlike other high-profile terrorism suspects accused of crimes arising from the attacks, Abu Ghaith bypassed the U.S. military prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, after his arrest last year.
WORLD
May 1, 2012 | By Brian Bennett and Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON — Osama bin Laden was devising a strategy for overthrowing Afghan President Hamid Karzai and controlling Afghanistan once the U.S. left the country, said a former U.S. official familiar with the cache of notes and letters that were seized last year in the raid on the terrorist leader's compound. Bin Laden had discussed his plans with the Taliban leadership council, known as the Quetta Shura, and the Haqqani network, which controls the North Waziristan tribal area in Pakistan, said the former official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity while discussing the intelligence.
WORLD
August 29, 2012 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon and CIA are reviewing a forthcoming book by a retired Navy SEAL who was on the May 2011 raid that killed Osama bin Laden, and they are considering legal action against the author for failing to submit his account for security review, officials said. U.S. intelligence officials are scrutinizing "No Easy Day" by former SEAL Matt Bissonnette to see if it reveals sensitive sources and techniques or operational details, a process that could take weeks. The book, due to go on sale next week and already on bestseller lists, has sparked a fierce debate in the close-knit special operations community about whether the long-standing ethic to stay silent for those who carry out America's most sensitive military operations is breaking down after a decade of war. PHOTOS: The death of Osama bin Laden Several U.S. officials who have read the book said it apparently does not quote from clearly classified documents, such as intelligence reports about Bin Laden's whereabouts or after-action reports about the raid.
NATIONAL
January 9, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - A former bodyguard for Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden has been cleared for release from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the first in a series of review hearings that the Obama administration is holding to speed up the eventual closure of the U.S. military prison for terrorist detainees, the Pentagon announced Thursday. Mahmoud Abd Al Aziz Al Mujahid, who allegedly underwent militant training at a secret camp in Afghanistan, is no longer a "significant threat" to the United States and is eligible for transfer from the prison at some point, the review board members decided.
NATIONAL
December 13, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik and Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
Did the torture of detainees lead the U.S. to Osama bin Laden? Democrats on the Senate Intelligence Committee say no. A major new film that was researched with high-level CIA access, however, shows torture as yielding a big break and setting in motion the chase that ended in the terrorist's death in Pakistan last year. The Hollywood drama, "Zero Dark Thirty," is intensifying a sharp political debate in Washington about the value of "enhanced interrogation techniques. " Although the filmmakers say they never intended to take sides in the debate and the movie is not a documentary, "Zero Dark Thirty" implies that torture can be effective.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
How many films about the search for and killing of Osama bin Laden can the market bear? The answer appears to be three - a bad one, a good one and now, a messy but provocative one. National Geographic Channel's docudrama "Seal Team Six" was first out of the Bin Laden box, although its combo of histrionic drama and sketchy intel made for a better headline than film. Kathryn Bigelow's "Zero Dark Thirty," on the other hand, provided a master class in how to turn a crowded, complicated, highly emotional series of events into a beautifully constructed, if factually controversial, story.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
PARK CITY, Utah -- Since opening in theaters last month, the Osama bin Laden manhunt film “Zero Dark Thirty” has intrigued audiences with its inside look at how CIA officers do their jobs. But the employees of the agency who tracked the Al Qaeda leader say that while they understand the need for dramatic license, the  Kathryn Bigelow film gets a number of details about their professional and personal lives wrong. “The individual hunches [are what] came through on 'Zero Dark,' and that's not exactly how it happens,” said Nada Bakos, who spent years as a CIA target officer, gathering intelligence that helped lead to the elimination of suspected terrorists.
NATIONAL
March 20, 2014 | By Richard Serrano
WASHINGTON - Ali Ahmad Razihi, accused of being a former bodyguard to Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, hopes someday to leave the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay and return to Yemen, where he plans to marry and help his family in their fruit and vegetable farm. At a hearing Thursday to decide whether he should get his wish, U.S. military lawyers said they couldn't say with certainty whether he remained a threat to this country. Razihi appeared at the Pentagon's latest Periodic Review Board hearing, becoming only the third Guantanamo detainee to do so. The hearings, begun by the Obama administration as a way to gradually empty and close the prison in Cuba, are giving half of the roughly 150 prisoners a chance to be moved to a list of detainees eligible for release.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - A cleric who gave a rousing speech urging jihad against "Jews, Christians and America" after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks testified at his terrorism trial Wednesday that he was speaking for Muslims, not for Al Qaeda, even though he delivered his message while sitting beside Osama bin Laden outside his mountain hide-out in Afghanistan. Sulaiman abu Ghaith held the witness stand for about four hours after defense attorney Stanley Cohen surprised the courtroom by calling the defendant to testify on his own behalf - something Cohen said he had done only twice in his 30-year career.
NATIONAL
March 17, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- The self-proclaimed architect of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks says a former Al Qaeda spokesman on trial in New York may have been "an eloquent, spell-binding speaker" who urged attacks on America, but he was not the high-level terrorist that prosecutors allege. In fact, Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, who was one of Al Qaeda's top organizers of terrorist operations, portrays Sulaiman abu Ghaith as a little-known figure who would never have been privy to details of upcoming attacks on Western targets.
WORLD
March 15, 2014 | By Zulfiqar Ali
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - A Pakistani tribal court on Saturday reduced the prison sentence for the doctor identified as helping the CIA track down Osama bin Laden from 33 years to 23 years. Shakil Afridi, convicted in 2012 of links to a banned militant group, was cleared of one of the charges against him: that he sought to wage war against Pakistan. Afridi was arrested by Pakistani authorities shortly after U.S. commandos killed the former Al Qaeda chief in a town outside Islamabad in May 2011.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- It was movie time at the guesthouse in Afghanistan, but this was no regular guesthouse, and it was no regular movie.  Once you checked in, you couldn't leave. Osama bin Laden was a visitor. Rooms were stocked with Al Qaeda books. And attendance was mandatory when staff wheeled in a TV in the spring of 2001 and showed "The Destruction of the American Destroyer USS Cole," about the October 2000 attack that killed 17 U.S. sailors.   One of the young men watching the movie was Sahim Alwan, a witness in the trial of alleged Al Qaeda propagandist Sulaiman abu Ghaith, which enters its second week Monday.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- Prosecutors portrayed an alleged Al Qaeda spokesman as a member of Osama bin Laden's inner circle Wednesday as they began trying to convince a jury that he knew in advance of terrorist plots against U.S. targets, even if he did not plan or take part in them.  But the defense attorney for Sulaiman abu Ghaith, who faces three terrorism-related charges, said the government was counting on fear and anger generated by the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks to convict a Muslim husband and father who had said some "dumb" things in the past.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
Director Kathryn Bigelow hasn't yet called "action" on her movie about the capture of Osama bin Laden, but the project is already stirring up controversy. Rep. Peter T. King (R-N.Y.), chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security, sent a letter to the CIA and the Defense Department on Tuesday asking for an investigation into whether the White House has granted Bigelow and Sony Pictures access to confidential information for the project. "I'm very concerned that any sensitive information could be disclosed in a movie," King said in a phone interview.
NATIONAL
March 20, 2014 | By Richard Serrano
WASHINGTON - Ali Ahmad Razihi, accused of being a former bodyguard to Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, hopes someday to leave the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay and return to Yemen, where he plans to marry and help his family in their fruit and vegetable farm. At a hearing Thursday to decide whether he should get his wish, U.S. military lawyers said they couldn't say with certainty whether he remained a threat to this country. Razihi appeared at the Pentagon's latest Periodic Review Board hearing, becoming only the third Guantanamo detainee to do so. The hearings, begun by the Obama administration as a way to gradually empty and close the prison in Cuba, are giving half of the roughly 150 prisoners a chance to be moved to a list of detainees eligible for release.
NATIONAL
March 3, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - A man whose friend died in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks was among potential jurors excused Monday from serving on the trial of Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, Sulaiman abu Ghaith, an alleged Al Qaeda propagandist accused of conspiring to kill Americans. The opening day of jury selection shed light on the effects the 2001 attacks had on some New Yorkers, even those who did not know people wounded or killed. Some potential jurors said they were not sure they could be impartial, given their memories of Sept.
NATIONAL
March 1, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Weeks after he took office, President Obama met privately with 40 grieving Americans, many clutching photographs of loved ones lost in terrorist attacks. The new president told them he would be closing Guantanamo Bay military prison within the year and putting many of the detainees there on trial in the U.S., where justice would be swifter. Five years later, the first and probably only federal court trial of a Sept. 11-related case will start with jury selection on Monday at a U.S. District courthouse in Lower Manhattan, blocks from ground zero, where the World Trade Center once stood.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|