Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOsama Bin Laden
IN THE NEWS

Osama Bin Laden

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 2, 2012 | By Katherine Skiba
WASHINGTON - Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, making the case Sunday on "Meet the Press" for President Obama's reelection, went on the offensive with a sound bite summarizing Obama's first term. “General Motors is alive and well and Osama bin Laden is not,” Emanuel said. Emanuel, who was Obama's first chief of staff, spoke after host David Gregory highlighted a network poll showing only 31% of respondents said they were better off since Obama took office and 69% said they were worse off or in the same place.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
March 20, 2014 | By Richard Serrano
WASHINGTON - Ali Ahmad Razihi, accused of being a former bodyguard to Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, hopes someday to leave the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay and return to Yemen, where he plans to marry and help his family in their fruit and vegetable farm. At a hearing Thursday to decide whether he should get his wish, U.S. military lawyers said they couldn't say with certainty whether he remained a threat to this country. Razihi appeared at the Pentagon's latest Periodic Review Board hearing, becoming only the third Guantanamo detainee to do so. The hearings, begun by the Obama administration as a way to gradually empty and close the prison in Cuba, are giving half of the roughly 150 prisoners a chance to be moved to a list of detainees eligible for release.
Advertisement
WORLD
May 24, 2012 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — A Pakistani doctor who led a phony vaccination campaign aimed at helping the CIA pinpoint Osama bin Laden's whereabouts was convicted of treason Wednesday and sentenced to 33 years in prison, a decision that is likely to further fray Washington's fragile relations with Islamabad. U.S. officials have been seeking the release of Shakeel Afridi since his arrest by Pakistani authorities after the secret American commando raid that killed the Al Qaeda leader in his sprawling compound in the garrison city of Abbottabad a year ago. In January, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta told CBS' "60 Minutes" that Afridi had provided intelligence that assisted the raid and criticized Pakistan's arrest of someone involved in helping track down the world's most wanted man. From the start, however, Pakistani authorities have regarded Afridi as a traitor and have ignored Washington's calls for his release.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - A cleric who gave a rousing speech urging jihad against "Jews, Christians and America" after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks testified at his terrorism trial Wednesday that he was speaking for Muslims, not for Al Qaeda, even though he delivered his message while sitting beside Osama bin Laden outside his mountain hide-out in Afghanistan. Sulaiman abu Ghaith held the witness stand for about four hours after defense attorney Stanley Cohen surprised the courtroom by calling the defendant to testify on his own behalf - something Cohen said he had done only twice in his 30-year career.
NEWS
August 29, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
In the book "No Easy Day," a former Navy SEAL writing under the pseudonym Mark Owen, details the death of Osama Bin Laden. The book, whose cover proclaims that it is "the firsthand account of the mission that killed Osama Bin Laden," will hit shelves Tuesday, a week earlier than scheduled, due to demand. Also, perhaps, due to the fact that several media outlets have gotten copies of it and begun revealing its contents. The Associated Press reports , "Bin Laden apparently was hit in the head when he looked out of his bedroom door into the top-floor hallway of his compound as SEALs rushed up a narrow stairwell in his direction, according to former Navy SEAL Mark Bissonnette, writing under the pseudonym Mark Owen.
OPINION
December 11, 2005 | SWATI PANDEY
Osama bin Laden has been uncharacteristically silent for nearly a year. He has issued no videotape since October 2004, or audiotape since Dec. 28, 2004, while second-in-command Ayman Zawahiri has issued seven such tapes. Is Bin Laden dead? Current asked five experts. * No "If he had died, it could not be hidden from the grid of Muslim extremist groups in Pakistan." -- Ahmed Rashid, author of "Taliban" and "Jihad" * Perhaps "In one of the very last videos, [he] looked very gaunt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2011 | John-Thor Dahlburg and Alex Rodriguez
Osama bin Laden, a scion of one of Saudi Arabia's wealthiest families, became the grim apostle of a strain of Islamic radicalism that exalted violence against non-believers, and the leader of a terrorist network that launched repeated attacks in the West, most spectacularly in the U.S. on Sept. 11, 2001. Born in 1957 to a life of privilege, Bin Laden was one of more than 50 offspring of a Saudi construction magnate. He spent his youth in mansions filled with crystal chandeliers, gold statues and Italian tapestries.
OPINION
April 17, 2002 | RANAN R. LURIE
Osama bin Laden is dead or deformed badly by shrapnel or so ill that he can't talk or show himself. No, I have not had the privilege of administering him his last rites or seen him buried or had a CIA agent whisper this information into my ear. However, because common sense is permitted in the court of public opinion, allow me to plead my case: When I saw the excerpts from the so-called "new" Bin Laden tape broadcast Monday, I knew that Bin Laden didn't exist anymore.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - The federal judge overseeing the case against accused Al Qaeda propagandist Sulaiman abu Ghaith on Wednesday granted a one-week delay in the trial's start date, giving defense attorneys additional time to review potential testimony that is expected to be offered by Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Shaikh Mohammed. The judge, Lewis A. Kaplan, agreed to postpone jury selection from next Monday to March 3. Defense lawyers had sought a 45-day delay. Last week, Mohammed, who is awaiting his own military trial at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, agreed to review and answer an extensive list of questions about Ghaith, who was Osama bin Laden's son-in-law.
NATIONAL
May 24, 2012 | By Kim Geiger, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - In the months after the U.S. militarymission that killed Osama bin Laden, Pentagon officials met with Hollywood filmmakers and gave them special access in an effort to influence the creation of a film about the operation, newly released documents show. Emails and meeting transcripts obtained from the Pentagon and CIA through a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit by the conservative watchdog group Judicial Watch suggest that officials went out of their way to assist the filmmakers, while trying to keep their cooperation from becoming public.
WORLD
March 15, 2014 | By Zulfiqar Ali
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - A Pakistani tribal court on Saturday reduced the prison sentence for the doctor identified as helping the CIA track down Osama bin Laden from 33 years to 23 years. Shakil Afridi, convicted in 2012 of links to a banned militant group, was cleared of one of the charges against him: that he sought to wage war against Pakistan. Afridi was arrested by Pakistani authorities shortly after U.S. commandos killed the former Al Qaeda chief in a town outside Islamabad in May 2011.
NATIONAL
March 1, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Weeks after he took office, President Obama met privately with 40 grieving Americans, many clutching photographs of loved ones lost in terrorist attacks. The new president told them he would be closing Guantanamo Bay military prison within the year and putting many of the detainees there on trial in the U.S., where justice would be swifter. Five years later, the first and probably only federal court trial of a Sept. 11-related case will start with jury selection on Monday at a U.S. District courthouse in Lower Manhattan, blocks from ground zero, where the World Trade Center once stood.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge Friday refused to halt or dismiss the case against Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, saying that suggestions the government had charged the wrong man were “utterly meritless” and ruling that the first Sept. 11-related trial to be held in New York will open with jury selection on Monday. Defense lawyers for Sulaiman abu Ghaith had filed a last-minute request for a delay in the trial or dismissal of the case altogether, claiming they had uncovered evidence that another man, a detainee at Guantanamo Bay, is the actual person who was the top Al Qaeda propagandist and warned of more airplane attacks.
NATIONAL
February 27, 2014 | By Richard Serrano
WASHINGTON - Days before his Sept. 11-related terrorism trial begins in New York, accused Al Qaeda propagandist Sulaiman Abu Ghaith again asked a federal judge to dismiss or postpone the proceedings, contending the government had charged the wrong man. In a federal court filing made public Thursday, Ghaith's attorneys said newly obtained evidence suggests a second individual with a similar name and past, who is currently incarcerated at Guantanamo Bay,...
NATIONAL
February 19, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - The federal judge overseeing the case against accused Al Qaeda propagandist Sulaiman abu Ghaith on Wednesday granted a one-week delay in the trial's start date, giving defense attorneys additional time to review potential testimony that is expected to be offered by Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Shaikh Mohammed. The judge, Lewis A. Kaplan, agreed to postpone jury selection from next Monday to March 3. Defense lawyers had sought a 45-day delay. Last week, Mohammed, who is awaiting his own military trial at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, agreed to review and answer an extensive list of questions about Ghaith, who was Osama bin Laden's son-in-law.
NATIONAL
January 9, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - A former bodyguard for Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden has been cleared for release from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the first in a series of review hearings that the Obama administration is holding to speed up the eventual closure of the U.S. military prison for terrorist detainees, the Pentagon announced Thursday. Mahmoud Abd Al Aziz Al Mujahid, who allegedly underwent militant training at a secret camp in Afghanistan, is no longer a "significant threat" to the United States and is eligible for transfer from the prison at some point, the review board members decided.
NEWS
January 29, 2000 | From Associated Press
A Mauritanian who reportedly has links to Saudi militant Osama bin Laden has been arrested on suspicion of having a role in plotting a bomb attack against the United States, security officials said Friday. Mohambedou Ould Slahi was being held at the offices of the Bureau of Mauritanian Security, said the officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity. He was arrested in this West African nation after leaving neighboring Senegal on Wednesday, they said.
OPINION
December 12, 2013 | Meghan Daum
Taking photos of ourselves is the signature act of our times. We know this not because the president snapped one with world leaders at Nelson Mandela's memorial service Tuesday, but because "selfie" is the Oxford English Dictionary's Word of the Year. And as you may read more than once in the weeks since the Nov. 19 announcement, this is a sign of the apocalypse. Just about every blogger, columnist and style reporter has deemed selfie-mania a pernicious outgrowth of the era's unparalleled narcissism.
NEWS
October 15, 2013 | By Cathleen Decker
Hillary Rodham Clinton has not said for sure if she is running for president in 2016. Joe Biden has not said for sure if he is running for president in 2016. Into that Democratic vacuum rides the wink-wink, nudge-nudge part of campaign 2016. On Tuesday, the Atlanta Journal Constitution quoted a source as saying that Clinton used a Q-and-A period after her closed-to-the-public speech in the city to note that she had backed the raid that ended in the death of Osama bin Laden. Not incidentally, the source said, the former secretary of State noted several times that Vice President Biden had opposed it. Clinton's team had insisted that no video or recordings be made of her speech, a familiar demand from her camp.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|