Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOsama Bin Laden
IN THE NEWS

Osama Bin Laden

OPINION
February 1, 2004 | Brian Michael Jenkins, Brian Michael Jenkins is a terrorism expert at the Rand Corp.
This is a tale of two speeches by two wartime leaders, each rallying his followers to fight for justice and combat evil aggressors. Placed side by side, the two speeches, nearly equal in length, are near-mirror images of each other. One speech was delivered by President Bush, the other by Osama bin Laden. In his State of the Union address on Jan. 20, Bush called for a continuation of the war on terror.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 21, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States launched a series of surprise missile strikes against terrorist bases in Afghanistan and an alleged weapons facility in Sudan on Thursday, contending they had been instrumental in the Aug. 7 bombings of two U.S. embassies in East Africa and were about to become the launching points for other attacks on Americans worldwide. The U.S. attacks, carried out with 75 to 100 Tomahawk cruise missiles launched from U.S.
NEWS
July 24, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When his son came into the world in November, Ghani Jan said he knew in an instant who his namesake would be. "I named him Osama, for Osama bin Laden," Jan, a soft-spoken clerk in the city's electricity department, said as he cradled his smiling son. "Osama bin Laden is such a good person. Everybody likes the name." Bin Laden, the suspected mastermind of the U.S. Embassy bombings in East Africa last year, is a folk hero to the villagers of Pakistan's untamed northwest frontier.
WORLD
March 30, 2006 | Mubashir Zaidi and Paul Watson, Special to The Times
Gunmen on Wednesday attacked and seriously injured a longtime ally of Osama bin Laden whom U.S. authorities have linked to an alleged terrorist sleeper cell in California. Fazlur Rehman Khalil, a signatory to Bin Laden's 1998 declaration of war on the United States and its allies, was severely beaten by eight armed men, supporters said.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lawyer for a naturalized U.S. citizen charged in the bombing of two American embassies in East Africa told a jury Thursday his client served Islamic militant Osama bin Laden as a business advisor and not as a terrorist. "The government has taken dots that don't have numbers and connected it into a picture they want," defense attorney Sam A. Schmidt said in closing arguments on behalf of Wadih El-Hage. "Mr. El-Hage was working like a dog to make money for Bin Laden," Schmidt said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2013 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
The hunt for Osama bin Laden last year proved a bigger draw for this past weekend's moviegoers than a battle against organized crime 70 years ago. The thriller "Zero Dark Thirty" had a decisive victory at the box office, grossing $24 million in the United States and Canada, according to an estimate from distributor Sony Pictures. Despite a bigger budget and more famous stars, such as Sean Penn, Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone, "Gangster Squad" opened to a disappointing $16.7 million.
NEWS
October 21, 2000 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former U.S. Army sergeant charged in the 1998 bombings of two American embassies in Africa pleaded guilty Friday and said Saudi militant Osama bin Laden examined a photograph of the embassy in Kenya and pointed to the spot where a truck bomb could do the most damage. Ali Mohamed, a 48-year-old Egyptian-born U.S. citizen, told the court that in late 1993, four years after leaving the military, he was asked by Bin Laden to conduct surveillance of U.S.
NEWS
January 3, 2001 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four alleged followers of Islamic extremist Osama bin Laden go on trial today for the 1998 bombings of two U.S. embassies in East Africa, amid massive security and restrictions so tight that jury selection will be closed to the public. The attacks in Nairobi, Kenya, and in the Tanzanian capital of Dar es Salaam left 224 people dead, including 12 Americans. More than 4,500 others were injured.
NATIONAL
May 26, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian and Rebecca Keegan
WASHINGTON - Some Republican lawmakers were outraged when federal records released last week showed that the White House, CIA and Defense Department granted high-level access last year to a pair of acclaimed filmmakers researching an action thriller about the raid that killed Osama bin Laden. The documents tell "a damning story of extremely close, unprecedented, and potentially dangerous collaboration" between the filmmakers and the Obama administration, fumed New York Rep. Peter T. King, GOP chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee.
NEWS
September 16, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush advised members of the U.S. military to "get ready" for battle against an enemy he identified with new specificity Saturday, calling Osama bin Laden "a prime suspect" behind Tuesday's terrorist attacks. "We're at war," Bush declared as he convened a meeting at Camp David with senior advisors to plot what he said would be a "sweeping, sustained and effective" campaign to eradicate terrorism. At Bush's side, Secretary of State Colin L.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|