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Oscar Arias

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WORLD
May 8, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Nobel laureate Oscar Arias begins a second stint as president today, in a nation divided over free trade with the United States. Arias first served as Costa Rica's president during the 1980s, when Central America was ripped by civil wars. He won the Nobel Peace Prize for his role in brokering an end to the conflicts. Arias, elected by a narrow margin, vows to push the Central American Free Trade Agreement with the United States through his nation's Congress.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
July 20, 2009 | Tracy Wilkinson and Alex Renderos
Talks to resolve the coup crisis in Honduras collapsed Sunday after the de facto government refused a mediator's proposal to reinstate ousted President Manuel Zelaya. The failure of negotiations under the direction of Costa Rican President Oscar Arias dashed the most promising diplomatic effort aimed at ending the crisis and raised the specter of more violence. "What is the alternative to dialogue?" a disappointed Arias said in San Jose, the Costa Rican capital. "Possibly . . .
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WORLD
May 9, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Nobel Peace Prize winner Oscar Arias, whose inauguration returned him to Costa Rica's presidency after 16 years, promised to work to stabilize the economy. About 4,000 marchers demanded that Costa Rica not ratify a free-trade pact with the U.S., which Arias supports.
WORLD
July 8, 2009 | Paul Richter and Tracy Wilkinson
Honduras' ousted president and the officials who exiled him have agreed to try to resolve their conflict through a U.S.-endorsed mediator, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton announced Tuesday. Signaling an expanding U.S. effort, Clinton said the two sides had agreed to talks supervised by Costa Rican President Oscar Arias, who was awarded a Nobel Prize in 1987 for his efforts to broker peace accords in Central America.
WORLD
February 23, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Nobel Peace Prize laureate and former President Oscar Arias won the Feb. 5 Costa Rican presidential election by 18,167 votes, one of the country's closest races ever. An Associated Press tabulation indicated that Arias received 664,545 votes compared with 646,378 for Otton Solis. Costa Rican election officials haven't declared the winner yet, pending the resolution of election challenges.
WORLD
February 6, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Nobel Peace laureate and former President Oscar Arias clung to a tiny lead in a Costa Rican presidential election. An exit poll had indicated that Arias would win, but with results from half of the polling stations counted, Arias had 40.7% of the vote to 40.3% for Otton Solis, who was once his planning minister. Arias backs a trade agreement between the United States and Central America. Solis seeks to renegotiate parts of the pact.
WORLD
March 8, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Oscar Arias, a Nobel Peace Prize winner, was declared Costa Rica's president-elect, more than a month after the vote that gave him a razor-thin victory. Arias defeated his nearest rival by little more than 18,000 votes of the 1.6 million cast, winning 664,551 votes to 646,382 for Otton Solis. The final official tally was delayed both by challenges from Solis' campaign and the closeness of the race, which prompted election officials to recount all of the votes by hand before declaring a winner.
NEWS
April 5, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez, supporting the Bush Administration on a key issue in the Central American peace process, said Tuesday that the Nicaraguan rebels should not be required to disband until Nicaragua institutes democratic reforms. Arias, the author of a widely acclaimed peace plan for the region, repeated his endorsement of President Bush's new policy on Nicaragua and, in a statement that clearly delighted Administration officials, added that he supports U.S.
NEWS
February 7, 1986 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The mountaintop chalet of Jose Figueres is a suitably Olympian setting for the one-time rebel who fathered modern Costa Rica's democracy. From the front step, Figueres can look for miles across the land he helped pacify 40 years ago, and, like a pint-sized Zeus in a gray wool suit, thunder at the folly of the mortals below.
OPINION
February 20, 2000 | Kitty Felde, Kitty Felde, a public-radio journalist, is the host of KPCC's Friday-morning "Talk of the City."
As President Bill Clinton ponders his post-presidential career options, he might consider the example of a former president of Costa Rica, Oscar Arias Sanchez. It was Arias who brokered a Central American peace deal at a time when no one believed it was possible. Arias served as Costa Rica's president from 1986 to 1990, a turbulent period in Central America. The Sandinistas were battling the Contras in Nicaragua, civil war raged in Guatemala and El Salvador was in turmoil.
WORLD
May 9, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Nobel Peace Prize winner Oscar Arias, whose inauguration returned him to Costa Rica's presidency after 16 years, promised to work to stabilize the economy. About 4,000 marchers demanded that Costa Rica not ratify a free-trade pact with the U.S., which Arias supports.
WORLD
May 8, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Nobel laureate Oscar Arias begins a second stint as president today, in a nation divided over free trade with the United States. Arias first served as Costa Rica's president during the 1980s, when Central America was ripped by civil wars. He won the Nobel Peace Prize for his role in brokering an end to the conflicts. Arias, elected by a narrow margin, vows to push the Central American Free Trade Agreement with the United States through his nation's Congress.
WORLD
March 8, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Oscar Arias, a Nobel Peace Prize winner, was declared Costa Rica's president-elect, more than a month after the vote that gave him a razor-thin victory. Arias defeated his nearest rival by little more than 18,000 votes of the 1.6 million cast, winning 664,551 votes to 646,382 for Otton Solis. The final official tally was delayed both by challenges from Solis' campaign and the closeness of the race, which prompted election officials to recount all of the votes by hand before declaring a winner.
WORLD
February 23, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Nobel Peace Prize laureate and former President Oscar Arias won the Feb. 5 Costa Rican presidential election by 18,167 votes, one of the country's closest races ever. An Associated Press tabulation indicated that Arias received 664,545 votes compared with 646,378 for Otton Solis. Costa Rican election officials haven't declared the winner yet, pending the resolution of election challenges.
WORLD
February 6, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Nobel Peace laureate and former President Oscar Arias clung to a tiny lead in a Costa Rican presidential election. An exit poll had indicated that Arias would win, but with results from half of the polling stations counted, Arias had 40.7% of the vote to 40.3% for Otton Solis, who was once his planning minister. Arias backs a trade agreement between the United States and Central America. Solis seeks to renegotiate parts of the pact.
WORLD
February 5, 2006 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
He was the Nobel laureate who stood up to Ronald Reagan and drafted the peace plan that ended Central America's civil wars. Now, two decades later, former President Oscar Arias is looking to retake Costa Rica's highest office. Thinner, grayer and not quite the superhero he was when he won the Peace Prize in 1987 during his first term in office, Arias leads the pack heading into today's elections.
OPINION
April 26, 1998 | ROBERT KUTTNER, Robert Kuttner is co-editor of the American Prospect
A side effect of the end of the Cold War has been a perverse escalation in arms sales to the Third World. U.S. arms makers are by far the leading weapons merchants, accounting for nearly half of all such sales. Oscar Arias, the former president of Costa Rica who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1987 for brokering peace in Central America, is currently in the United States, giving lectures and trying to shift U.S. policy. But with American arms makers seeking new customers and U.S.
WORLD
February 5, 2006 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
He was the Nobel laureate who stood up to Ronald Reagan and drafted the peace plan that ended Central America's civil wars. Now, two decades later, former President Oscar Arias is looking to retake Costa Rica's highest office. Thinner, grayer and not quite the superhero he was when he won the Peace Prize in 1987 during his first term in office, Arias leads the pack heading into today's elections.
OPINION
February 20, 2000 | Kitty Felde, Kitty Felde, a public-radio journalist, is the host of KPCC's Friday-morning "Talk of the City."
As President Bill Clinton ponders his post-presidential career options, he might consider the example of a former president of Costa Rica, Oscar Arias Sanchez. It was Arias who brokered a Central American peace deal at a time when no one believed it was possible. Arias served as Costa Rica's president from 1986 to 1990, a turbulent period in Central America. The Sandinistas were battling the Contras in Nicaragua, civil war raged in Guatemala and El Salvador was in turmoil.
OPINION
April 26, 1998 | ROBERT KUTTNER, Robert Kuttner is co-editor of the American Prospect
A side effect of the end of the Cold War has been a perverse escalation in arms sales to the Third World. U.S. arms makers are by far the leading weapons merchants, accounting for nearly half of all such sales. Oscar Arias, the former president of Costa Rica who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1987 for brokering peace in Central America, is currently in the United States, giving lectures and trying to shift U.S. policy. But with American arms makers seeking new customers and U.S.
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