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Oscar Janiger

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2001 | SUSAN CARPENTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oscar Janiger, a pioneering Los Angeles psychiatrist best known for "turning on" Hollywood celebrities and well-known literary figures to LSD in the 1950s, died Tuesday of kidney and heart failure at Little Company of Mary Hospital in Torrance. He was 83. A maverick of the mind, "Oz," as he was known to friends and associates, was one of the first American researchers to study the psychedelic drugs DMT and LSD.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2001 | SUSAN CARPENTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oscar Janiger, a pioneering Los Angeles psychiatrist best known for "turning on" Hollywood celebrities and well-known literary figures to LSD in the 1950s, died Tuesday of kidney and heart failure at Little Company of Mary Hospital in Torrance. He was 83. A maverick of the mind, "Oz," as he was known to friends and associates, was one of the first American researchers to study the psychedelic drugs DMT and LSD.
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NEWS
September 30, 1988 | DIANNE KLEIN, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Oscar Janiger, a small, gnomish man of 70, was musing about what he called "the real milestone in the history of our understanding of the human mind." It's a Promethean fire, he was saying, awe inspiring, potentially dangerous and extraordinarily wonderful. Janiger, a man Timothy Leary calls "super legitimate," was talking about LSD--lysergic acid diethylamide-25-- the hallucinogen alternately blamed and praised for blowing the minds of millions.
NEWS
September 30, 1988 | DIANNE KLEIN, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Oscar Janiger, a small, gnomish man of 70, was musing about what he called "the real milestone in the history of our understanding of the human mind." It's a Promethean fire, he was saying, awe inspiring, potentially dangerous and extraordinarily wonderful. Janiger, a man Timothy Leary calls "super legitimate," was talking about LSD--lysergic acid diethylamide-25-- the hallucinogen alternately blamed and praised for blowing the minds of millions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1986
Once again we have a person using the prestigious title of doctor, to extol the wonders of "finding ourselves" by the drug route (Times, June 30). Dr. Oscar Janiger and Minerva Herzog make it sound almost holy, as Timothy Leary did a few decades ago. They fail to mention those beautiful young people who fell for Leary's siren song and thought they could fly by launching themselves from tall buildings. Hopefully, Janiger, Herzog and their adherents will be quietly forgotten.
NEWS
July 24, 1988 | DICK RORABACK
Two months ago, Martha Esch, flying in the face of convention, set out from Orlanda, Fla., to hitchhike around the contiguous 48 states. Last week she touched down in Camarillo aboard a 1938 Lockheed Electra 12-A. On Tuesday, she left Torrance on a '39 Waco, en route via Santa Paula to the 31 states she's missed so far. While in Los Angeles, Esch took the controls of the Goodyear Blimp, and later dreamed of what might have been in the cockpit of earthbound Spruce Goose.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1997 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Allen Ginsberg's America" might have come a little late to the Ginsberg memorial game--observances have already been held in L.A. and several other cities since the poet's death in April at age 70--but the event, held Saturday at the Wadsworth Theater, made up for it in sheer bulk. Clocking in at 5 1/2 hours, the program of poetry, music, performance art, drawing, raconteuring and film clips reflected the scale of Ginsberg's influence on the century's literary and popular culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1986 | ALAN GOLDSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
Minerva Herzog stood before an acrylic-on-canvas she made about 27 years ago, motioned her hand around its cloudy, multicolored brush strokes, and proclaimed she could not have made it without a little help--from LSD. Herzog, now a 73-year-old Venice painter, says her experiments with the hallucinogenic drug in the late 1950s removed her inhibitions as an artist, allowing her to escape from rigid, representational forms into a free-form world of exploding colors.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Day breaks on this reach of beach to the scuffing of joggers and rummaging of the homeless. Later, Bill Fischler shoves open the flaking door of tattered Patrick's Roadhouse and at 7:58 a.m., morning becomes official. A jukebox that played in Ricky Nelson's den shuffles through a mongrel collection of 45s from "La Boheme" to Kid Ory and stops at Billy Eckstein. Fischler sings through an open window to deserted sand and his is a dreadful falsetto with a vibrato trapped in 72-year-old pipes.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1993 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans willing to try unorthodox remedies to relieve asthma, back pain, insomnia and other ailments are gradually pulling the practice of alternative medicine into the mainstream. With one prominent study showing that one in three Americans turn to alternative treatments each year--spending $13.7 billion in the process--health insurers and doctors are taking a harder look at the benefits of acupuncture, biofeedback, naturopathy and the like.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1991 | HARRY NELSON, Nelson is a retired Times medical writer
LSD, the mind-blowing chemical banned during the 1960s as a dangerous drug, may enjoy a revival of scientific interest from researchers searching for a tool to probe the mysteries of brain chemistry. Recent advances made in understanding chemicals that relay nerve impulses in the brain, known as neurotransmitters, and the action of drugs on these chemicals have set the stage for a new look at LSD as a study tool. "There is a place for LSD in (such studies).
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