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March 3, 1997 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The name of Oscar Micheaux won't register with a lot of people when the subject of the earliest days of the movie western comes up. Tom Mix, maybe William S. Hart, and that's probably it. Micheaux, however, was the most important figure in the black western, a small but significant film industry that began in the late teens and continued for a handful of years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2009 | Susan King
Oscar Micheaux was not only the first African American to make a feature film -- 1919's silent "The Homesteader" -- he was also the first to make a sound feature film -- 1931's "The Exile." But whether the film had subtitles or spoken words, Micheaux always had bigger things in mind. "He was very much a moralist," Jan-Christopher Horak, head of UCLA Film and Television Archive, says of the pioneering director. "He certainly had some unique ideas about uplifting the race. For the black middle class at that time period that was the goal -- uplifting the race, getting them more political and social power."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2009 | Susan King
Oscar Micheaux was not only the first African American to make a feature film -- 1919's silent "The Homesteader" -- he was also the first to make a sound feature film -- 1931's "The Exile." But whether the film had subtitles or spoken words, Micheaux always had bigger things in mind. "He was very much a moralist," Jan-Christopher Horak, head of UCLA Film and Television Archive, says of the pioneering director. "He certainly had some unique ideas about uplifting the race. For the black middle class at that time period that was the goal -- uplifting the race, getting them more political and social power."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2007 | David Ehrenstein, Special to The Times
"BLACK show business was the most delicious layer cake white America never tasted," film biographer Patrick McGilligan remarks in "Oscar Micheaux: The Great and Only." As this detailed work makes clear, Micheaux is one of the tartest layers. Only 15 of more than 40 feature films he made survive. Considering that 90% of silent cinema is lost, along with many pre-1950 talkies, it's a miracle that anything remains of this work from the ragged margins of early small-time independent film production.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1986 | DAVID T. FRIENDLY, Times Staff Writer
Oscar Micheaux is hardly a familiar name in the annals of film history, but he may soon have his own star on Hollywood Boulevard. The massive film encyclopedias used by film schools and journalists rarely mention him. There is just one clipping on the director in The Times' library. Even some of the most serious students of film have never heard of him.
NEWS
August 21, 1986 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Lorenzo Tucker, American cinema's best-known black leading man in an era when blacks were forced to produce their own films that were then shown to segregated audiences, has died. The actor many called "The Black Valentino" for his dashing good looks and star qualities was 79 and died Tuesday night at his home in Hollywood. His biographer, Richard Grupenhoff, said he had been suffering from cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2007 | David Ehrenstein, Special to The Times
"BLACK show business was the most delicious layer cake white America never tasted," film biographer Patrick McGilligan remarks in "Oscar Micheaux: The Great and Only." As this detailed work makes clear, Micheaux is one of the tartest layers. Only 15 of more than 40 feature films he made survive. Considering that 90% of silent cinema is lost, along with many pre-1950 talkies, it's a miracle that anything remains of this work from the ragged margins of early small-time independent film production.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2003 | Patrick McGilligan, Special to The Times
Chicago Retired Chicago high school principal LeRoy Collins was a movie star once -- and only once. The movie was "The Betrayal," the very last production by director Oscar Micheaux, shot in the Chicago vicinity in 1947. That makes Collins one of the last witnesses to an era and a man whose mystique has never been greater.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
As the first African American feature filmmaker, Oscar Micheaux had no distribution machinery in place for his work. So he would often drive from town to town to present his latest film to black audiences who were tired of seeing themselves portrayed by white filmmakers as lazy, shiftless, cowardly -- if they were portrayed at all. African American men took the brunt of these negative stereotypes, often being depicted in such films as D.W.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Bette Davis became the first woman to receive the American Film Institute's life achievement award in 1977, she ended her heartfelt acceptance speech saying, "As I say good night, I would like to quote my favorite line from all of the pictures I have made: 'Ah'd love to kiss ya but ah just washed mah hair!' " The first of the famous Davis lines occurred in "Cabin in the Cotton" (1932), which screens today at 5:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2003 | Patrick McGilligan, Special to The Times
Chicago Retired Chicago high school principal LeRoy Collins was a movie star once -- and only once. The movie was "The Betrayal," the very last production by director Oscar Micheaux, shot in the Chicago vicinity in 1947. That makes Collins one of the last witnesses to an era and a man whose mystique has never been greater.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
As the first African American feature filmmaker, Oscar Micheaux had no distribution machinery in place for his work. So he would often drive from town to town to present his latest film to black audiences who were tired of seeing themselves portrayed by white filmmakers as lazy, shiftless, cowardly -- if they were portrayed at all. African American men took the brunt of these negative stereotypes, often being depicted in such films as D.W.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1997 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The name of Oscar Micheaux won't register with a lot of people when the subject of the earliest days of the movie western comes up. Tom Mix, maybe William S. Hart, and that's probably it. Micheaux, however, was the most important figure in the black western, a small but significant film industry that began in the late teens and continued for a handful of years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Bette Davis became the first woman to receive the American Film Institute's life achievement award in 1977, she ended her heartfelt acceptance speech saying, "As I say good night, I would like to quote my favorite line from all of the pictures I have made: 'Ah'd love to kiss ya but ah just washed mah hair!' " The first of the famous Davis lines occurred in "Cabin in the Cotton" (1932), which screens today at 5:30 p.m.
NEWS
August 21, 1986 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Lorenzo Tucker, American cinema's best-known black leading man in an era when blacks were forced to produce their own films that were then shown to segregated audiences, has died. The actor many called "The Black Valentino" for his dashing good looks and star qualities was 79 and died Tuesday night at his home in Hollywood. His biographer, Richard Grupenhoff, said he had been suffering from cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1986 | DAVID T. FRIENDLY, Times Staff Writer
Oscar Micheaux is hardly a familiar name in the annals of film history, but he may soon have his own star on Hollywood Boulevard. The massive film encyclopedias used by film schools and journalists rarely mention him. There is just one clipping on the director in The Times' library. Even some of the most serious students of film have never heard of him.
MAGAZINE
July 14, 1991
Your next article on Spike should be written by Whoopi Goldberg. And, as for filmmaking, let's not forget that Oscar Micheaux was a noted Afro-American pioneer more than 70 years ago. ANDREW S. YOUNG Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Pioneer film maker Oscar Micheaux, who wrote, produced, directed and distributed more than 35 silent and sound films, has become the first black director to be honored with a star on the Walk of Fame. His 1924 film "Body and Soul" starred Paul Robeson in his first screen role.
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