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April 26, 1991 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a gray day last week on the Universal Studios back lot, film director John Landis pulled his black Volvo station wagon up to a busy construction site. Dressed in a natty blue suit, he eased through a work area of hard hats and flannel shirts. Landis made his way to the place where his new film "Oscar" was shooting before a devastating blaze in November swept across the back lot, causing $25 million in damage and consuming the New York brownstones Landis was using.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2013 | By Gerrick Kennedy
New York Times op-ed columnist Maureen Dowd is the latest to lash out at the liberties taken with historical accuracy in movies contending for Oscars this year. Dowd voiced her frustrations in a column Sunday about a few critically acclaimed - and nominated for best picture - films including “Argo” and “Zero Dark Thirty,” films that have been the subject of criticism for their portrayals of historical events.  But the film that drew the bulk of her ire was Steven Spielberg's “Lincoln.” Dowd is asking the director to re-film or re-dub a scene from the drama, written by Tony Kushner and starring Daniel Day-Lewis, so that it properly represents the vote of two Connecticut House of Representatives members on the 13th Amendment.
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NEWS
February 23, 2006 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN AND JOHN HORN
Q: Combined box office for this year's best picture candidates is downright anemic. Why should the public care about this year's Oscars? John: First, it's three full hours of Jon Stewart, which is 2 1/2 hours more than you get on "Comedy Central." Second, the suspense is killer -- not over who will win best picture but how the show's producers are going to present the nominated "Hustle & Flow" song, "It's Hard Out Here for a Pimp."
NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
Sitting here in Best Picture Limbo, thumbing through the year-old magazines (Ryan Reynolds and Blake Lively? No way that works!) and waiting for the bell to ring on the remaining Oscar candidates - "Zero Dark Thirty," "Django Unchained," "Les Miserables," the "Hobbit" movie - we can at least report on one sure-fire contender that's arriving in theaters ... not next month but tomorrow. Consider the movie's pedigree: Its acting ensemble features two Oscar winners and two other actors who have been nominated seven times through the years.
NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
Sitting here in Best Picture Limbo, thumbing through the year-old magazines (Ryan Reynolds and Blake Lively? No way that works!) and waiting for the bell to ring on the remaining Oscar candidates - "Zero Dark Thirty," "Django Unchained," "Les Miserables," the "Hobbit" movie - we can at least report on one sure-fire contender that's arriving in theaters ... not next month but tomorrow. Consider the movie's pedigree: Its acting ensemble features two Oscar winners and two other actors who have been nominated seven times through the years.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2013 | By Gerrick Kennedy
New York Times op-ed columnist Maureen Dowd is the latest to lash out at the liberties taken with historical accuracy in movies contending for Oscars this year. Dowd voiced her frustrations in a column Sunday about a few critically acclaimed - and nominated for best picture - films including “Argo” and “Zero Dark Thirty,” films that have been the subject of criticism for their portrayals of historical events.  But the film that drew the bulk of her ire was Steven Spielberg's “Lincoln.” Dowd is asking the director to re-film or re-dub a scene from the drama, written by Tony Kushner and starring Daniel Day-Lewis, so that it properly represents the vote of two Connecticut House of Representatives members on the 13th Amendment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Richard Wilson, 46, an administrator for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences who was keeper of the Oscar statuettes, died April 23 of an apparent heart attack at his home in West Hollywood, the academy announced. An employee of the academy since 1988, Wilson opened the organization's first New York office in 1998 and ran it for two years before returning to Beverly Hills, where he served as executive assistant to academy President and Executive Director Bruce Davis.
NEWS
February 27, 1993
Ted Haworth, 75, an Oscar-winning motion picture art director. Haworth, whose given name was Edward, won an Academy Award for the 1957 film "Sayonara." Other films he worked on included "Marty," "Some Like It Hot," "The Longest Day," "Batteries Not Included" and "Mr. Baseball." In Provo, Utah, on Feb. 18 as the result of a blood clot on his brain.
NEWS
May 30, 1985
Loren L. Ryder, one of Hollywood's most honored sound directors who was awarded five Academy Awards and nominated for 12 more, has died in a Monterey convalescent hospital. He was 85, and died Tuesday. From 1936 until 1957, Ryder was sound director and chief engineer at Paramount, where he was nominated for his first Oscar for that studio's 1937 production of "Wells Fargo."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2005 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Joel Hirschhorn, the songwriter who shared Academy Awards for theme songs in two catastrophe-oriented motion pictures, "The Poseidon Adventure" and "The Towering Inferno," has died. He was 67. Hirschhorn, who lived in Agoura Hills, died early Sunday of a heart attack at Los Robles Hospital and Medical Center in Thousand Oaks, his wife, documentary producer Jennifer Carter Hirschhorn, said Monday. She said Hirschhorn had fallen Friday night and broken his shoulder.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2011 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
Credit the "The King's Speech" for 12 Oscar nominations, $236 million in worldwide box office ? and a lot more business for speech therapists. Across the nation, clinics specializing in speech disorders and stutterers themselves say the film about British King George VI's battle to overcome a lifelong stammer has inspired many others, often shy and reluctant to seek assistance, to reach out for professional help. At the Stuttering Foundation of America, a nonprofit organization that provides information on stuttering and referrals to therapists nationwide, donations have shot up 20% since the movie opened, officials said.
NEWS
February 23, 2006 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN AND JOHN HORN
Q: Combined box office for this year's best picture candidates is downright anemic. Why should the public care about this year's Oscars? John: First, it's three full hours of Jon Stewart, which is 2 1/2 hours more than you get on "Comedy Central." Second, the suspense is killer -- not over who will win best picture but how the show's producers are going to present the nominated "Hustle & Flow" song, "It's Hard Out Here for a Pimp."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2005 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Joel Hirschhorn, the songwriter who shared Academy Awards for theme songs in two catastrophe-oriented motion pictures, "The Poseidon Adventure" and "The Towering Inferno," has died. He was 67. Hirschhorn, who lived in Agoura Hills, died early Sunday of a heart attack at Los Robles Hospital and Medical Center in Thousand Oaks, his wife, documentary producer Jennifer Carter Hirschhorn, said Monday. She said Hirschhorn had fallen Friday night and broken his shoulder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Richard Wilson, 46, an administrator for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences who was keeper of the Oscar statuettes, died April 23 of an apparent heart attack at his home in West Hollywood, the academy announced. An employee of the academy since 1988, Wilson opened the organization's first New York office in 1998 and ran it for two years before returning to Beverly Hills, where he served as executive assistant to academy President and Executive Director Bruce Davis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2003 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
"FireDancer," the first Afghan film to be submitted for an Academy Award nomination, made its Southern California premiere Sunday with a background story worthy of its own movie. For starters, the producer is accused of decapitating the director and stuffing the head in his refrigerator.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2001 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks after Mike Myers cracked a few jokes at the expense of movie sound technicians as a presenter at this year's Academy Awards, tempers are still flaring within Hollywood's close-knit sound community over the comedian's barbs. Robert Rehme, president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, issued a written apology to the academy's sound branch, stressing, "we will certainly endeavor to see that it doesn't happen again."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1995 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is cracking down on some of the more extravagant elements of Oscar promotion campaigns. And not all the major studios are happy about it. In a memo dated Nov.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1990 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A reasonable person sitting through Michael Moore's critically praised documentary "Roger & Me" might come away from the film believing that since 1986, when Moore began his two-year quest to get General Motors chairman Roger Smith to visit economically-depressed Flint, Mich., that: * An automotive theme park, a mall and a new Hyatt Regency hotel had been initiated to encourage tourism during that period.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2001 | JUDY HEVRDEJS, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
This is the season for Academy Award predictions, with a string of film-critic groups kicking off the race for the gold statue by announcing their picks. And, it's the season for Curtis Hanson, who directed the much-nominated "L.A. Confidential" and this season's contender, "Wonder Boys," to take all the Oscar prognosticating with a grain of salt and shot of wry.
NEWS
April 11, 2000 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first, it sounded like a good idea to Ilana Romano: a documentary that would recount the massacre of 11 Israeli athletes at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, Germany. Romano's husband, wrestler Joseph Romano, was killed in the tragedy, one of the most horrifying chapters in Palestinian terrorism. And a film must have seemed a good idea to a lot of other people, since "One Day in September" won an Academy Award last month as best feature documentary.
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