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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2010 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Labor Department issued a critical report on enforcement of workplace safety in California on Tuesday and ordered the state to fix myriad problems, including poor training of safety inspectors and delays in responding to complaints. Federal officials took aim at the state Division of Occupational Safety and Health, saying, among other things, that inspectors do not always review a company's history statewide before deciding whether to cite it for repeat violations. They also found that the division's appeals process "falls short.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Matt Stevens
State workplace safety inspectors have opened an investigation into the death of a baggage worker at Los Angeles International Airport despite an initial report indicating he had a heart attack. Based on that report, Erika Monterroza, spokeswoman the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, said an inspection was not initially planned into the death Friday of Cesar Valenzuela, 51. However, inspectors visited LAX Monday and "for whatever reason, Cal/OSHA decided there was a need to open an investigation,” Monterroza said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By David Ng
Cirque du Soleil said it will appeal the six citations named by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration in the June death of an aerialist during a performance of  its "Ka" show in Las Vegas.  OSHA said Tuesday that it is proposing six citations against Cirque du Soleil, saying that the Montreal company didn't provide proper training for the performer and didn't properly assess the workplace for hazards.  Citations from the safety...
NATIONAL
January 21, 2014 | By Michael Muskal, This post has been updated. See note below for details
Investigators returned to an Omaha animal feed plant Tuesday searching for a second body and investigating the cause of the blaze and partial building collapse that killed two and injured at least 10 employees. [Updated 3:36 p.m.:  Authorities recovered the body of the second worker Tuesday afternoon, the Associated Press reported. Authorities believe no other people are still in the building. The two workers who were killed were found on the second floor. ]   “We redeployed at first light,” Lincoln Fire Chief John Huff told the Los Angeles Times by telephone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1987
The excuses are over, now how about some responsible action? The budget is now in the black. The state costs for Cal/OSHA are $8 million less, $2.5 million generated by Cal/OSHA. Actual cost is $5.5 million in today's dollars. The state income overage is $2,770 million. One percent of this one year overage will fund Cal/OSHA for five years. The budget was the only reason given by Deukmejian's representatives at the public meetings of the Senate Industrial Relations Committee, and responses to letters from our membership, regarding your elimination of Cal/OSHA.
NEWS
July 29, 1987 | Associated Press
The government today fined General Dynamics Corp., the nation's largest defense contractor, $615,000 for what it called 122 "willful" violations of the law in not reporting job injuries and illnesses among shipyard workers at its Electric Boat Division yards at Quonset Point, R.I. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration said it was fining the company $5,000 each for 121 alleged instances of failing to record or misrecording job-related injuries and illness at the yard in 1985 and 1986.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1987
In January of this year, Gov. George Deukmejian made public his plan to eliminate Cal/OSHA and turn the protection of workers in California over to the federal Occupational, Safety and Health Administration program, allegedly to save the taxpayers $8 million. This is a terrible blunder that will cost the people of California dearly in terms of increases in worker illness, injury and death. If the Cal/OSHA program is abandoned, there surely will be annual losses of untold millions of dollars due to lost worker productivity, increased medical costs and escalating workers' compensation expenditures.
NEWS
May 24, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
The Labor Department on Tuesday proposed regulations designed to protect 5.3 million workers from exposure to blood and other bodily fluids potentially infected with AIDS, hepatitis and other serious viruses. Occupational Safety and Health Administration spokesman Frank Kane said the proposed standard would be the agency's first formal regulation on biological hazards. Kane said 4.7 million health care workers would be covered by the standard, as well as an additional 600,000 persons working in law enforcement, fire and rescue crews, correctional facilities, research laboratories, blood banks and the funeral industry.
NEWS
June 10, 1989 | From Associated Press
A federal appeals court Friday ordered the Labor Department to reconsider the cancer risk from exposure to formaldehyde and its decision not to guarantee full wages to workers disabled by the gas. The U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington said the department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration "has failed adequately to explain" its finding that the risk of getting cancer from exposure to formaldehyde was not significant if employers complied...
NEWS
July 26, 1987 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, Times Staff Writer
Senate President Pro Tem David A. Roberti (D-Los Angeles) called on voters Saturday to support a ballot initiative to restore Cal/OSHA, the state worker safety agency gutted by Gov. George Deukmejian earlier this month. Turning to the initiative process out of frustration with Deukmejian's policies, the Democratic leader said he would join with labor unions, health advocates and environmentalists to revive the "desperately needed" state inspection program.
NATIONAL
January 20, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A fire and structural collapse at an animal feed processing plant killed some people and injured at least 10 workers, four critically, the Omaha fire chief said Monday.  Officials had said earlier that the fire at the International Nutrition plant may have been precipitated by an explosion. But at a televised afternoon news conference, interim fire chief Bernie Kanger said it was unclear whether there had been a blast.  “We are classifying this as an industrial accident that led to a structural fire,” he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By David Ng
Cirque du Soleil said it will appeal the six citations named by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration in the June death of an aerialist during a performance of  its "Ka" show in Las Vegas.  OSHA said Tuesday that it is proposing six citations against Cirque du Soleil, saying that the Montreal company didn't provide proper training for the performer and didn't properly assess the workplace for hazards.  Citations from the safety...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
The state agency overseeing workplace safety has opened an investigation into an adult film studio over a shoot involving an actress who last week tested positive for HIV. Cal/OSHA opened the investigation last week into San Francisco-based Kink Studios, which runs a network of fetish sites, in response to a complaint filed by the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, agency spokesman Greg Siggins said. Adult film production came to a halt after the actress, who works under the screen name Cameron Bay, tested positive for HIV in one of the industry's regular required screenings for sexually transmitted diseases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2013 | By Kate Mather
State officials are investigating the death of an Ontario dairy worker crushed while moving cattle over the weekend. Winston Perez, 28, suffered severe internal injuries after he was "crushed between a gate and the fence by the cows" about 5 a.m. Saturday at Dick Dykstra Dairy, coroner's and state officials said. The Riverside man underwent surgery at Arrowhead Regional Medical Center, but died in the intensive care later that day. Cal/OSHA spokesman Peter Melton noted state officials had no record of safety violations at the dairy.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2013 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
A ride at Disneyland and another at Disney California Adventure Park remained closed Monday as park officials worked to fix safety violations cited by the state. Disney officials said they voluntarily closed Disneyland's Space Mountain and Soarin' Over California at Disney California Adventure Park in Anaheim over the weekend while they review their safety procedures. Park officials said they have no estimate on when the rides will reopen. The state's Division of Occupational Safety and Health issued fines Friday of $234,850 for six violations related to the maintenance of fire extinguishers and safety barriers and anchors for exterior cleaners and other workers on Space Mountain.
NEWS
March 25, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
State regulators have fined a producer of the upcoming Walt Disney Studios movie “The Lone Ranger” more than $60,000, citing numerous safety violations in connection with a crew member who died at a movie ranch in Acton. A 48-year-old diver drowned in September while cleaning a water tank in preparation for shooting an underwater scene at the Polsa Rosa Ranch in northern Los Angeles County. After an investigation, California's Division of Occupational Safety and Health cited Silver Bullet Productions Inc. for various violations of the state labor code stemming from the fatality, according to a report issued Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2004 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
A 72-year-old farmworker died Monday after falling from stacked pallets of cardboard boxes at Rio Farms in Camarillo, authorities said. Julian Romero of Oxnard was attempting to remove an empty wooden pallet used to hold down a tarp protecting an 8-foot stack of loaded pallets, according to the company. A co-worker using a forklift helped him get to the top of the pallets, and it appeared that Romero lost his footing, fell and struck his head on the pavement below, authorities said.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - California safety officials ordered Chevron Corp. to pay a record-high fine of nearly $1 million for safety violations that led to a massive fire last summer at a refinery in the San Francisco Bay Area. After the Aug. 6 explosion at Chevron's facility in Richmond, Calif., an emergency telephone network advised tens of thousands of people in that city to stay indoors behind closed doors and windows to avoid breathing potentially dangerous sulfuric acid and nitrogen dioxide fumes.
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