Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOsha
IN THE NEWS

Osha

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2010 | By Jessica Garrison
The head of the state Senate's Labor Committee accused a workplace safety board Wednesday of being biased toward employers and ignoring a law that requires fines for failing to report on-the-job injuries. After a hearing, Sen. Mark DeSaulnier (D-Concord) said he might introduce legislation that could lead to criminal charges against board members if they continue to disregard the law that calls for a $5,000 fine for employers' failing to report accidents in a timely manner. The hearing came after a Times investigation last fall that found that the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health appeals board repeatedly dismissed and reduced the penalties levied by division inspectors, even in situations in which workers had died or were seriously injured.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 1, 1987 | TED ROHRLICH and HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Staff Writers
About a third of the state hygienists who watch for chemical hazards in the workplace have quit their jobs at the state's job safety agency as a result of Gov. George Deukmejian's vow to abolish the department on July 1. One of the hygienists was being sought Thursday on criminal charges that he repeatedly threatened to kill the governor and injure other top state officials because of the roles they are playing in the agency's prospective demise.
NEWS
December 23, 1987 | DOUGLAS SHUIT and MAURA DOLAN, Times Staff Writers
Deukmejian Administration officials ordered a halt to illegal asbestos waste removal work at state buildings Tuesday, saying the order would be in effect until contractors can prove they are complying with state law. The action will bring an end to asbestos removal jobs under way at a number of state office buildings, including one a block from the Capitol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1990
The state's worker safety agency has recommended a $2,000 fine against a construction company whose crane toppled during work on the Century Freeway project in Inglewood in January, killing a truck driver. The firm, Steve P. Rados Inc. of Santa Ana, was cited for three serious worker safety violations--those that the employer should have known about and were likely to cause harm--and one general violation stemming from the Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1988
You have done a disservice to your readers in your Oct. 16 editorial "Safety: Yes on 97." Instead of critically examining the facts, you relied upon the misleading arguments put out by the proponents of the initiative. Contrary to your assertions, the safety of California workers has not been compromised. I want workers to be adequately protected, and they are under the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration program. The federal program is being relied upon by 27 other states, including strong organized labor states such as New York and Massachusetts.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1996
The focus of "Unions Back Ergonomic Proposal" (Jan. 18) gives little attention to the most critical point of the issue. Instead of focusing on the political ramifications of regulations, you would do better to examine the everyday facts. Namely, there is no consensus from the medical and scientific communities as to the causes of ergonomic disorders, often called repetitive stress injuries, and, more important, there is no consensus for cures or treatments. A regulation cannot create a fix if a fix doesn't exist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1999 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disneyland has scheduled a meeting with a state worker-safety official to discuss the citations it received for faulty training and equipment use in the Christmas Eve accident that killed a tourist and injured his wife and a park worker. The meeting will be held Tuesday with James Brown, the head of the Anaheim office of the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health. Brown said the entertainment company did not disclose what it wanted to discuss.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1993
The federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration has fined Texaco Inc. $147,500 for 29 violations of safety standards stemming from an explosion in October at the company's Wilmington refinery. The fines follow a joint investigation of the explosion by OSHA and Cal/OSHA, which Tuesday issued seven citations carrying $83,500 in penalties. The most serious federal violation, resulting in a $25,000 fine, was levied for Texaco's failure to develop and implement safe work practices.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|