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Oskar Schindler

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Filmmaker Jon Blair, whose 10-year-old British documentary about Oskar Schindler airs tonight just before those other Oscars, has recently fretted on the record that he never "cracked" the Schindler enigma. "I always felt it was a weakness in my film that I couldn't explain Schindler's motivation," Blair said about the man who rescued 1,100 Jews from the Nazi ovens, "and ("Schindler's List" director Steven) Spielberg told me the same about his. . . ." Blair--and Spielberg--needn't fret.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2013 | Elaine Woo
Among the 1,100 Jews saved from the Nazis by German industrialist Oskar Schindler was an emaciated 13-year-old boy named Leon Leyson, who had to stand on a box to reach the machinery in the Krakow factory where Schindler sheltered him and his family. The boy Schindler called "Little Leyson" survived the Holocaust to start life over in Los Angeles. He taught high school in Huntington Park for 39 years, rarely mentioning to anyone the pain and perils he experienced during the war that claimed the lives of 6 million Jews.
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NEWS
June 20, 1993 | DRUSILLA MENAKER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Two elderly Polish women gaze at a grainy photo of a man of easy confidence astride his horse. It is Oskar Schindler, a Nazi Party member who became their wartime savior. Schindler came to Krakow to profit from the German occupation, and then, for reasons never entirely clear, saved Poles from forced labor and hundreds of Jews from death camps.
TRAVEL
November 5, 2010 | By Tim Richards, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As I stood on a cracked concrete sidewalk in the Podgorze district of Krakow, I began to understand just what "wrong side of the tracks" meant. Ahead of me was a stark railroad bridge that carried commuters across the Vistula River to the city's historic heart. Beneath it was a pedestrian walkway, claustrophobically low and forbidding. Punctuating the end of the street, it seemed like a grim gateway of sorts, and so it was. Beyond the bridge, past a collection of featureless industrial buildings in various states of repair, was Krakow's newest attraction ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1994 | MARK DENNIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
He's a retired printer living in Arizona who unwittingly ensured Oskar Schindler's passage to safety in the uncertain days after the fall of the Third Reich. He also recently became a key figure in an unsettling documentary about American attitudes toward Jews in the days of Adolf Hitler. Kurt Klein, now 74, had a quirky encounter with Schindler at the end of World War II that probably saved Schindler from confinement in a detention camp.
TRAVEL
November 5, 2010 | By Tim Richards, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As I stood on a cracked concrete sidewalk in the Podgorze district of Krakow, I began to understand just what "wrong side of the tracks" meant. Ahead of me was a stark railroad bridge that carried commuters across the Vistula River to the city's historic heart. Beneath it was a pedestrian walkway, claustrophobically low and forbidding. Punctuating the end of the street, it seemed like a grim gateway of sorts, and so it was. Beyond the bridge, past a collection of featureless industrial buildings in various states of repair, was Krakow's newest attraction ?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1997 | ROBERT STEVENS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Chris Tashima was first offered the role of Chiune "Sempo" Sugihara in Tim Toyama's one-act play "Visas and Virtues," it didn't take long for him to accept. "Being an Asian actor you don't get a chance to play heroes," Tashima, 37, says. "The fact that the play was about Sugihara excited me. . . . The chance to portray him onstage for even a moment would be great."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1995 | JEFF BEAN
Leopold Page, the Polish-born Jew whose story of Oskar Schindler inspired the award-winning book and film "Schindler's List," will speak Wednesday at Saddleback College. The free event is open to the public and will be in Room 225 of the Student Services Center. The college is at 28000 Marguerite Parkway. Page immigrated to the United States in 1947 and opened a leather goods store in Beverly Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1994
Chiune Sugihara ("An Unsung 'Schindler' From Japan," March 20), who saved between 2,000 and 6,000 Jews from the Nazis by writing visas for them when he was Japan's consul general in Lithuania, was honored in this country in May, 1989, by the Anti-Defamation League when it awarded him its "Courage to Care Award." The award, instituted by the ADL to recognize heroic efforts by non-Jews in behalf of Jews, was presented to Sugihara's widow, Yukiko, and their son, Hiroki, in a moving ceremony I attended at the agency's national headquarters building opposite the United Nations in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1993 | THOMAS KENEALLY, Thomas Keneally is author of the 1982 book "Schindler's List," upon which Steven Spielberg's film, which opens Wednesday, is based . The Australian-born Keneally was moved during a visit to Los Angeles to write the book, which examines German businessman Oskar Schindler and the Jews he saved during World War II. Keneally, who won England's Booker Prize for "Schindler's List," is also the author of "The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith" and "To Asmara" and teaches in the graduate writing program at UC Irvine. Here, he remembers the original Schindler survivors who inspired his book:
Thirteen years ago, I was returning to Australia from a film festival in Sorrento, Italy, where Fred Schepisi's film of my novel "The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith" had been shown. In those days Australia wasn't quite the glamour destination it is now. There were only two flights a week from Los Angeles to Sydney. Between planes, my publisher got me to do some book promotion, and I found myself staying in the splendid Beverly Wilshire Hotel. Among my luggage was a briefcase with a sprung hinge, caused by packing in too much film festival bumf.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2009 | Religion News Service
Talk about an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth. In Quentin Tarantino's blood-soaked new film, "Inglourious Basterds," a band of Jewish soldiers bash collect Nazi soldiers' scalps in a bid to avenge their people and stop the Holocaust. Tarantino's World War II fantasy and its orgy of violence are little more than cartoonish savagery and perhaps a cathartic experience for some Jewish viewers. It's a sort of reverse form of Schadenfreude: Jews giving Nazis the ultimate taste of their own medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2008 | Ari B. Bloomekatz, Bloomekatz is a Times staff writer.
Gilberto Bosques Saldivar has never been the subject of a major motion picture by Steven Spielberg. American history books seldom, if ever, mention his name, and he does not have his own Wikipedia page, in Spanish or English. But the former Mexican diplomat, stationed in France during World War II, helped save as many as 40,000 Jews and other refugees from Nazi persecution.
NEWS
November 2, 2008 | David Rising, Rising writes for the Associated Press.
The "Silent Heroes" now have a voice. A new memorial center in Berlin pays tribute to the thousands of German gentiles who risked everything to save Jews from persecution by the Nazis and documents the stories of those who sometimes spent years in hiding. The "Silent Heroes" memorial center opened to the public last week amid a new focus in recent years on the legacy of the "good German" -- individuals who resisted Hitler, were labeled as traitors by the Nazis and were often shunned after the war. "Their accomplishments were totally forgotten, and this is an initiative to bring them back into our memory," said Johannes Tuchel, director of the German Resistance Memorial Center Foundation, which is behind the new memorial.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2008 | Michael Harris, Harris is a freelance critic and the author of the novel "The Chieu Hoi Saloon."
As all the world knows by now, a hard-drinking, womanizing, black-marketing German industrialist named Oskar Schindler saved some 1,100 Jewish slave laborers from the Holocaust. Thomas Keneally turned the story into a novel -- originally titled "Schindler's Ark" in Britain -- that won the Man Booker Prize in 1982.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2005 | Krzysztof Kopacz, Associated Press
The factory where Oskar Schindler shielded more than 1,000 Jews from the Holocaust is to be turned into a museum commemorating the German industrialist whose life was made famous in Steven Spielberg's film, officials said Friday. Since the 1993 release of the Academy Award-winning "Schindler's List," tourists to Krakow have sought out the factory where Schindler kept the emaciated Jews, claiming their work was essential to the survival of his metalworks.
NEWS
January 15, 2004 | From Associated Press
Steven Spielberg's Oscar-winning "Schindler's List," one of the most acclaimed films about human survival amid the horrors of the Holocaust, is coming to DVD. The disc set, planned for release March 9, will be accompanied by interviews with some of the people who lived through the movie's story in real life, Universal Studios Home Video announced Wednesday.
NEWS
January 15, 2004 | From Associated Press
Steven Spielberg's Oscar-winning "Schindler's List," one of the most acclaimed films about human survival amid the horrors of the Holocaust, is coming to DVD. The disc set, planned for release March 9, will be accompanied by interviews with some of the people who lived through the movie's story in real life, Universal Studios Home Video announced Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2001 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leopold "Paul" Page, a Holocaust survivor whose unremitting determination to honor the German businessman who saved his life and those of 1,200 other Jews during World War II inspired the book and epic film "Schindler's List," has died. A retired Beverly Hills retailer, Page died Friday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. He was 87. Page's achievement boils down to this: He had a story to tell, and Thomas Keneally needed a briefcase.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Emilie Schindler, the wife of industrialist Oskar Schindler who played an important role in his efforts to save hundreds of Jews from Nazi death camps during World War II, has died. She was 93. Schindler died Friday at a hospital in Strausberg, outside Berlin, where she had been taken July 21 for treatment of an undisclosed ailment, her biographer, Erika Rosenberg, announced in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2001 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leopold "Paul" Page, a Holocaust survivor whose unremitting determination to honor the German businessman who saved his life and those of 1,200 other Jews during World War II inspired the book and epic film "Schindler's List," has died. A retired Beverly Hills retailer, Page died Friday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. He was 87. Page's achievement boils down to this: He had a story to tell, and Thomas Keneally needed a briefcase.
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