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Osteoporosis

BUSINESS
August 25, 1995 | Times Wire Services
The Food and Drug Administration has approved an easier way for some women with osteoporosis to take their medicine. The best treatment is the hormone estrogen, but many women suffer side effects, including a possibly higher risk of certain cancers. For those women, the only alternative has been injections of the hormone calcitonin, which is derived from salmon. The FDA recently approved a version of calcitonin in an easier-to-use nasal spray, called Miacalcin.
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HEALTH
August 31, 1998 | BARBARA J. CHUCK
What with all the warnings from the medical community, you might have this feeling in your bones--that you're at risk for osteoporosis. It's a health condition that makes your bones weak and more likely to break. And while all women (and some men) are at risk for osteoporosis, some are more likely to suffer from it than others.
NATIONAL
October 25, 2002 | From Associated Press
A compound that works like estrogen, but with none of the side effects, has been found to prevent brittle bone disease in mice. The discovery may offer an alternative for women who stopped hormone replacement therapy because of the risks of cancer and heart disease. In a study appearing today in the journal Science, researchers say experiments with the compound estren increased bone density and strength in mice that had been surgically altered to mimic menopause.
NEWS
October 9, 1995 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Last week the Food and Drug Administration approved the first non-hormonal treatment of osteoporosis, Fosamax. With other medications on the horizon, an emerging issue is how to make the best use of bone mineral density testing, which can diagnose osteoporosis or even a woman's risk for it. Here, a closer look at osteoporosis. * Most women know that they should have a mammogram and Pap smear at regular intervals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Alendronate, a drug designed to build stronger bones in people prone to osteoporosis, can corrode the tube leading to the stomach if it is taken improperly, according to a study in the New England Journal of Medicine. A group led by Dr. Piet C. de Groen of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., found three serious cases in which alendronate, trade named Fosamax, had apparently become lodged in the esophagus and had corroded its lining.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
Younger women taking a commonly prescribed thyroid hormone may be at increased risk for bone-thinning osteoporosis if they are treated with too high a dose for a long period of time.
NEWS
November 4, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Boron, a trace element not previously known to be important in the human diet, may play a key role in preventing osteoporosis, a debilitating bone condition that afflicts many older women, U.S. scientists reported in a paper to be published today. If confirmed by additional human studies, the finding may have broad implications because osteoporosis, or the loss of calcium from the bone, affects up to 20 million mostly post-menopausal women in the United States alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
Even Bronze Age women had osteoporosis despite their presumably active lives, according to researchers from the Vienna University Hospital. The team reported in the New England Journal of Medicine that they used X-rays to determine the density of bones from 14 women buried at Unterhautzental, Austria, and found that they were about 11% less dense than bones from five men, indicating that the women were at greater risk for fractures.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Merck & Co.'s osteoporosis drug, Fosamax, cuts the chances that patients with the bone-thinning disease will be hospitalized, according to findings released Sunday. Women treated with Fosamax, also called alendronate, were 20% less likely to be hospitalized than those taking a placebo, a study said. The study also provides the first evidence that older women who break a bone are more likely to be hospitalized for other reasons, Merck said.
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