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Osteoporosis

BUSINESS
September 15, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Merck & Co.'s osteoporosis drug, Fosamax, cuts the chances that patients with the bone-thinning disease will be hospitalized, according to findings released Sunday. Women treated with Fosamax, also called alendronate, were 20% less likely to be hospitalized than those taking a placebo, a study said. The study also provides the first evidence that older women who break a bone are more likely to be hospitalized for other reasons, Merck said.
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BUSINESS
July 14, 1995 | From Associated Press
Americans may soon get their first new treatment for osteoporosis in 20 years. Government scientists declared Thursday that the drug Fosamax increases bone strength and reduces fractures in older women. An advisory committee unanimously recommended the Food and Drug Administration approve the drug, which would become the first non-hormonal treatment for the nation's 20 million osteoporosis patients.
HEALTH
May 9, 2005 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
Bone loss can be insidious, going unnoticed in millions of people -- most of them women -- until spinal damage becomes severe or until a hip fracture starts a spiraling physical decline. Drugs can fight the often-debilitating condition, known as osteoporosis, but they can cause unpleasant side effects. As a result, many people stop taking them, leaving their bones to become ever more brittle and more likely to break.
NEWS
May 19, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A drug used to prevent osteoporosis in older women reduces the risk of breast cancer by as much as 70% without any serious side effects, researchers said Monday at a meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology in Los Angeles. The risk reduction produced by the drug, called raloxifene, is about the same as that reported earlier this year for tamoxifen, but the latter drug can increase the risk of endometrial cancer and blood clots.
HEALTH
November 9, 1998 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
The first guidelines advising doctors just who should undergo osteoporosis screening and how patients should be treated have been released by a consortium of nongovernment health organizations.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2004 | Emma Schwartz, Times Staff Writer
Men as well as women should do more to prevent osteoporosis, or cases of the bone-wasting disease will mount with the aging population and put a heavy burden on the country's medical system, Surgeon Gen. Richard H. Carmona said Thursday. Osteoporosis "represents a major public health problem," largely because people lack awareness of it and fail to take available steps to combat it, said the surgeon general's first report on the condition.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A relatively inexpensive and widely available drug can halve the rate of vertebral fractures in women with osteoporosis, according to a study that may offer a new treatment option for some of the 24 million Americans who suffer from brittle bones. The drug, called etidronate, is used to treat Paget's disease, a bone disorder among middle-aged and elderly people. It is not approved for use against osteoporosis, but the manufacturer intends to apply for federal permission.
NEWS
October 3, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration Monday approved the first non-hormonal drug to treat osteoporosis, a progressive and often crippling bone disease that may afflict as many as 25 million Americans. The approval offers the first drug alternative to hormone replacement therapy for post-menopausal women, who are particularly susceptible to the condition.
NEWS
September 4, 1997 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Long known as a scourge of older women, the thinning, brittle bones of osteoporosis have now achieved a measure of gender parity: A new study suggests for the first time that aging men as well as women can reverse bone loss and prevent fractures by boosting their intake of calcium and vitamin D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2000 | RENEE MOILANEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Researchers at UC Irvine are teaming up with a South County high school for a study that may one day transform traditional physical education classes into holistic health programs aimed at putting teens on a path to a lifetime of exercise. This summer, about 20 girls from El Toro High School in Lake Forest are expected to enroll in a specialized physical education class with extras rarely offered in high school, such as personalized exercise training, dancing and lectures on nutrition.
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