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Osteoporosis

HEALTH
April 30, 2001 | JUDY FOREMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Scientists who normally shy away from words such as "cure" and "breakthrough" say researchers are on the verge of what could be a revolution in the treatment of osteoporosis, the dangerous bone-thinning condition that is responsible for 1.5 million fractures in the United States each year.
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NEWS
October 3, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration Monday approved the first non-hormonal drug to treat osteoporosis, a progressive and often crippling bone disease that may afflict as many as 25 million Americans. The approval offers the first drug alternative to hormone replacement therapy for post-menopausal women, who are particularly susceptible to the condition.
NEWS
September 4, 1997 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Long known as a scourge of older women, the thinning, brittle bones of osteoporosis have now achieved a measure of gender parity: A new study suggests for the first time that aging men as well as women can reverse bone loss and prevent fractures by boosting their intake of calcium and vitamin D.
SCIENCE
May 3, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
A yearly 15-minute intravenous infusion of a new drug substantially reduces bone fractures in post-menopausal women, offering a new treatment option for women who have trouble taking existing bone-strengthening drugs, researchers reported today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2000 | RENEE MOILANEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Researchers at UC Irvine are teaming up with a South County high school for a study that may one day transform traditional physical education classes into holistic health programs aimed at putting teens on a path to a lifetime of exercise. This summer, about 20 girls from El Toro High School in Lake Forest are expected to enroll in a specialized physical education class with extras rarely offered in high school, such as personalized exercise training, dancing and lectures on nutrition.
NEWS
April 7, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In a surprising discovery, UCLA researchers have found that atherosclerosis, better known as hardening of the arteries, may arise in part through the formation of bone in the arteries. The finding, reported today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, could open the door to new therapies to prevent atherosclerosis, which is treated by controlling intake of cholesterol and fats, said Dr. Linda Demer, associate chief of cardiology at the UCLA School of Medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1997 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Medical scientists based at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles have shown that osteoporosis, a much-dreaded ailment of old age, appears to have roots in early childhood, with some children inheriting genes that increase their risk of brittle bones later in life. Led by Dr. Vicente Gilsanz, a radiologist at the hospital, and Jesus Sainz, a neurology researcher at the UCLA School of Medicine, the scientists used CT scanners to measure the bone density of 100 healthy girls between 6 and 12 years old.
NEWS
July 23, 1987
The Southern California chapter of the Arthritis Foundation has awarded a $60,000 grant to UCLA endocrinologist Theodore Hahn for a study on rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. Rheumatoid arthritis patients are at high risk at an early age for osteoporosis, a dangerous thinning of the bones, officials said.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Amgen Inc. said its experimental osteoporosis drug denosumab reduced fractures in women with the bone-thinning disease in a study. The trial of 7,800 women with osteoporosis found that denosumab strengthened bones and reduced spinal and hip fractures, the Thousand Oaks-based company said.
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