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Oswaldo Paya

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2012 | Times wire services
Cuban activist Oswaldo Paya, who spent decades speaking out against the communist government of Fidel and Raul Castro and became one of the most powerful voices of dissent against their half-century rule, died Sunday in a car crash in Cuba. He was 60. Paya and a Cuban man described by media as a fellow activist, Harold Cepero Escalante, died in an accident in La Gavina, just outside the eastern city of Bayamo, Cuban authorities said. A Spaniard and a Swede also riding in the car were injured.
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WORLD
October 5, 2012 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Cuba's best-known blogger was arrested Thursday to keep her from covering a sensitive criminal trial involving the death of a famous dissident. But then the world noticed. News agencies blogged about the details of the arrest. Human rights groups condemned it. By Friday, the blogger, Yoani Sanchez, was back on the streets. So it goes in the Caribbean nation headed by Fidel Castro's younger brother, Raul, whose government has released dozens of long-term political dissidents in the last few years - but also has detained government critics and troublemakers for brief periods in an apparent effort to thwart negative news coverage and stifle public criticism.
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WORLD
December 13, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Cuba's best-known dissident, Oswaldo Paya, detailed what analysts said was the most complete plan ever presented for a peaceful transition to democracy and a market economy. In the first public challenge to Fidel Castro by a top dissident since a roundup of opponents this year, Paya's manifesto, distributed to foreign reporters, calls for freedom for political prisoners, the return of exiles, privatizing much of the economy and preserving Cuba's free education and health care.
WORLD
October 5, 2012 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Cuba's best-known blogger, a prominent critic of its government, was arrested by authorities, apparently to prevent her from covering the trial of a conservative Spanish politician who is accused of causing the death of a Cuban dissident in a car crash this summer. The arrest Thursday of Yoani Sanchez and her husband, fellow blogger Reinaldo Escobar, was reported by pro-government Cuban blogs and confirmed Friday by Elizardo Sanchez, head of the independent Cuban Commission for Human Rights and National Reconciliation.
WORLD
October 5, 2012 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Cuba's best-known blogger was arrested Thursday to keep her from covering a sensitive criminal trial involving the death of a famous dissident. But then the world noticed. News agencies blogged about the details of the arrest. Human rights groups condemned it. By Friday, the blogger, Yoani Sanchez, was back on the streets. So it goes in the Caribbean nation headed by Fidel Castro's younger brother, Raul, whose government has released dozens of long-term political dissidents in the last few years - but also has detained government critics and troublemakers for brief periods in an apparent effort to thwart negative news coverage and stifle public criticism.
WORLD
October 5, 2012 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Cuba's best-known blogger, a prominent critic of its government, was arrested by authorities, apparently to prevent her from covering the trial of a conservative Spanish politician who is accused of causing the death of a Cuban dissident in a car crash this summer. The arrest Thursday of Yoani Sanchez and her husband, fellow blogger Reinaldo Escobar, was reported by pro-government Cuban blogs and confirmed Friday by Elizardo Sanchez, head of the independent Cuban Commission for Human Rights and National Reconciliation.
WORLD
October 24, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
The European Parliament awarded the European Union's top human rights prize to Cuban dissident Oswaldo Paya, chief promoter of a reform initiative in the Communist nation. The initiative, known as the Varela Project, became the most serious internal political challenge to date faced by Cuban leader Fidel Castro. It resulted in May in a petition for a referendum on political reforms, such as freedom of expression and an amnesty for political prisoners.
WORLD
May 11, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
In a challenge to Fidel Castro's 43-year-old rule, activists delivered more than 11,020 signatures to the National Assembly, demanding a referendum for broad changes in Cuba's socialist system less than two days before a visit by former U.S. President Carter. The signature-gathering campaign pushes for reforms in Cuba's one-party system. "In Cuba, change for all rights will only be achieved if the majority of Cubans decide to conquer them peacefully," campaign coordinator Oswaldo Paya said.
OPINION
July 19, 2003
Kudos for publishing the brave words of Oswaldo Paya (Commentary, July 14), one of Cuba's dissidents and a recognized voice for peaceful resistance to Castro's regime. It is indeed high time for all governments and human rights organizations to make clear to the Cuban dictator that enough is enough, and that Stalinism belongs in history and not in the 21st century. Enough with the "imperialist U.S." excuse, and enough with the "Cuban sovereignty" excuse. And if some Latin American politicians seem to admire Castro ("Latins Warm to Castro's Defiance," July 14)
WORLD
November 3, 2002 | From Reuters
Cuba's National Assembly met Saturday but did not discuss a pending dissident petition for moderate reforms of the island's one-party Communist government. The rubber-stamp legislature, which meets twice a year for a few days, unanimously approved a law granting private agricultural cooperatives greater profit incentives to spur food production in the economically battered country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2012 | Times wire services
Cuban activist Oswaldo Paya, who spent decades speaking out against the communist government of Fidel and Raul Castro and became one of the most powerful voices of dissent against their half-century rule, died Sunday in a car crash in Cuba. He was 60. Paya and a Cuban man described by media as a fellow activist, Harold Cepero Escalante, died in an accident in La Gavina, just outside the eastern city of Bayamo, Cuban authorities said. A Spaniard and a Swede also riding in the car were injured.
WORLD
December 13, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Cuba's best-known dissident, Oswaldo Paya, detailed what analysts said was the most complete plan ever presented for a peaceful transition to democracy and a market economy. In the first public challenge to Fidel Castro by a top dissident since a roundup of opponents this year, Paya's manifesto, distributed to foreign reporters, calls for freedom for political prisoners, the return of exiles, privatizing much of the economy and preserving Cuba's free education and health care.
WORLD
February 19, 2003 | From Reuters
The former governor of Illinois who spared all inmates on death row, Pope John Paul II, a Cuban dissident and Irish rock star Bono are among a near-record 150 nominees for the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize. "We have a total of 150 nominees so far, of which 21 are organizations," Geir Lundestad, the head of the Norwegian Nobel Institute, said Tuesday after compiling a list of names sent in by a Feb. 1 deadline.
OPINION
January 2, 2003
It's been almost a month since the European Union awarded Cuban Oswaldo Paya its Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought, and still no ticker-tape parades through Havana. This should surprise no one. Indeed, the communist nation's dictator and apparatchiks have done nothing but badmouth Paya's courageous, nonviolent struggle to win for Cubans liberties that Americans take for granted.
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