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Otis Nixon

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September 19, 1991 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Left fielder Lonnie Smith's body trembled with rage. His voice cracked, and his eyes moistened. Smith, along with his Atlanta Brave teammates, took a vow Monday that they would not talk about left fielder Otis Nixon after he tested positive for a controlled substance and was suspended for 60 days. Smith hadn't talked to the media in nearly two months, anyway. But hours before the Atlanta Braves' 6-4 victory Wednesday over the San Diego Padres, his feelings seeped out.
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SPORTS
August 15, 1997 | MIKE DOWNEY
Otis Nixon has done something in two days as a Dodger that I didn't think was humanly possible. He makes Mike Piazza feel fat. "The guy, he's chiseled like Mr. Universe. He's got about 2% body fat," marveled Piazza, who is not exactly a 98-pound weakling. "He's built like a statue. Next to him, we're like a bunch of blobs walking around." Mike, it's true. Otis does have a lean, mean, sportswriter's kind of body. Nixon is a 38-year-old outfielder with the rippled midriff of a middleweight boxer.
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SPORTS
November 8, 1991
The Major League Baseball Players Assn. will file a grievance asking that Atlanta outfielder Otis Nixon's drug suspension be reduced from 60 days to time served.
SPORTS
August 15, 1997 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Segui kept staring at Dodger center fielder Otis Nixon, staring at Nixon's glove, probably wondering what it takes to get a ball over that glove, since Nixon had robbed him of two home runs Thursday afternoon. Maybe Segui should have been staring at Mike Piazza's bat. Piazza hit a ball in the third inning where even the high-jumping Nixon, on a trampoline, couldn't have reached it.
SPORTS
December 7, 1991 | From Associated Press
Otis Nixon's attempt to shorten his drug suspension from 60 days to time served was turned down Friday by George Nicolau, baseball's permanent arbitrator. Atlanta's free-agent outfielder was suspended by Commissioner Fay Vincent on Sept. 16 after testing positive for cocaine. He missed the final 21 days of the regular season, the NL playoffs and the World Series. Nicolau's ruling means Nixon also will miss the first 18 days of the 1992 season.
SPORTS
December 17, 1991 | JIM MURRAY
All right, Miss Blue Eyes, how about a letter to Gene Autry, the head Angel on this year's Christmas tree? Ready? Mark it, "Open anytime." "Dear Gene: "I know I am presuming on an old acquaintance to address you in this way but, after all, we go back to Bev Barnett and John Wayne and Mitch Hamilburg, right? To the days when Will Rogers gave you some advice, 'Keep working!' (Or was that Duke Wayne he said it to?) "No matter. I have a subject of some interest I'd like to discuss with you.
SPORTS
September 20, 1991 | Associated Press
Dave Dombrowski joined the expansion Florida Marlins as general manager Thursday after three years at the same position with the Montreal Expos, where he was both praised and criticized for his aggressive approach to the job. "This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity," Dombrowski, 35, said after a news conference at Joe Robbie Stadium, which will be the Marlins' home when they field their first team in 1993. "The opportunity to put together something from scratch just doesn't happen."
SPORTS
September 18, 1991 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Weiner, assistant general counsel of the Major League Players Assn., said Tuesday that the union will decide "in the next few days" whether to file a grievance on behalf ofOtis Nixon. The Atlanta Brave outfielder was suspended for 60 days by Commissioner Fay Vincent Monday after a positive drug test, a violation of his 1987 aftercare program. A grievance, Weiner said, could be based on any one of several aspects.
SPORTS
August 14, 1997 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They embraced and chatted briefly Wednesday, sharing the moment. Then they smiled and laughed the way old friends do at reunions. And then they got back to work, because the San Francisco Giants are still out there. A big hug from longtime friend Brett Butler helped welcome Otis Nixon, the newest Dodger, to the team. But time, and a division race, didn't allow for too much reminiscing. Nixon and Butler are together again, just as they were more than a decade ago in Cleveland.
SPORTS
August 13, 1997 | STEVE SPRINGER and JASON REID
Otis Nixon played in the first inning of Tuesday night's Minnesota-Toronto game. When the Blue Jays took the field in the second inning, however, Nixon was missing. He had been yanked out of the lineup and dropped into the middle of a division race. The Dodgers, anxious to put more men on base, more speed in their lineup and more experience on the roster, acquired Nixon from the Blue Jays on Tuesday for minor league catcher Bobby Cripps.
SPORTS
December 10, 1994 | From Associated Press
Jose Canseco and Fenway Park appear to be made for each other. Now, the slugger and the ballpark will be united. Canseco, a right-handed power hitter, was acquired by the Boston Red Sox from the Texas Rangers on Friday for center fielder Otis Nixon and minor league third baseman Luis Ortiz. Should the baseball strike be settled, Canseco will be taking aim in April at Fenway's "Green Monster," the 37-foot-high wall 315 feet down the left-field line.
SPORTS
October 26, 1993 | Associated Press
Will Clark filed for free agency, Otis Nixon bid goodby to the Atlanta Braves and Toronto cut its ties with Jack Morris Monday as baseball's business season began. Clark, Nixon and National League batting champion Andres Galarraga were among 21 players who filed for free agency, the start of the two-week filing period. Clark, a first baseman who has spent his entire career with the San Francisco Giants, is the biggest name among the 118 players eligible. He slumped to a .
SPORTS
November 1, 1992 | JOE GERGEN, NEWSDAY
To Otis Nixon, it was better to have played and lost than not to have played at all. No man on either team had a greater appreciation for the privilege of participating in the 1992 World Series than the Atlanta Braves' outfielder. If the fate of his team was going to rest on any individual's shoulders, he welcomed the responsibility.
SPORTS
October 27, 1992 | JIM MURRAY
By common consent and newspaper lore, every World Series has a hero and a goat. The tradition probably started in the 1912 World Series, when an otherwise sure-handed New York Giant outfielder named Fred Snodgrass dropped an easy fly in the 10th inning of the final game, giving the Boston Red Sox the title. The use of the word goat as the opposite of hero is believed to have derived from that incident.
SPORTS
October 11, 1992 | ROSS NEWHAN
Otis Nixon wouldn't say it, but maybe he did anyway. Maybe his four hits, two runs and stolen base served as a reminder that Deion Sanders, his illustrious center-field backup with the Atlanta Braves remains only that, a backup. The Braves pushed the Pittsburgh Pirates to the brink of extinction in the National League playoffs Saturday night with a 6-4 victory for a 3-1 lead in the best-of-seven series.
SPORTS
April 26, 1992 | JIM MURRAY
I knew it was going to be a bummer of a weekend when I read where Otis Nixon, the Atlanta Braves' outfielder, was going to use a computer as a batting aid. Then I got blindsided by a reader, Ray Banks of Torrance, who is all shook up because I applauded the ditching of instant replay as an officiating aid in football. "Ohmigod!" he wrote. "Jim Murray has gone back to the 19th Century! He revels in the abolition of instant replay." You bet I do. But Banks is frothing at the mouth.
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