Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOtto Natzler
IN THE NEWS

Otto Natzler

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2007 | Claudia Luther, Special to The Times
Otto Natzler, a master glazer and wizard of the kiln who with his wife, Gertrud, created some of the most admired ceramic objects of the 20th century, has died. He was 99. Natzler, who was vital and active into his 90s through a regimen of yoga and physical exercise, died of cancer April 7 at his Los Angeles home, his art dealer, Darrel Couturier, said Tuesday. The Natzlers' elegant and daring works -- she was the potter -- helped elevate ceramics from a "decorative art" to a fine art.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2012 | By Leah Ollman
The surfaces of Adam Silverman's new clay pots at Edward Cella feel generated by organic forces over time. Some are crusty and cratered, like hardened lava. Some bear the deep cracks of parched earth. Others look sheathed in creeping lichen. The vessels are relatively conventional in shape (spheres and extrapolations on the gourd), but after layered glazes and multiple firings, they're striking and inventive when it comes to texture and color. Silverman, who trained and previously worked as an architect, describes what he does as "creating an object or skin that holds space.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2000 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
A 50-year survey of ceramics by Otto and Gertrud Natzler is more than an opportunity to admire impossibly beautiful pottery. It's a chance to remember the lives and the accomplishments of the Los Angeles-based couple who became world-famous for marrying elegantly simple clay forms with spectacular glazes. And no one knows the story better than Otto Natzler, who lost his wife 29 years ago but is still going strong. "How many other 92-year-olds have you interviewed?"
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2011 | By Scarlet Cheng, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The shift in ceramics from craft to art form was a quiet revolution in postwar Southern California. "Common Ground: Ceramics in Southern California 1945-1975" at the American Museum of Ceramic Art in Pomona explores that big topic through the influence of one man, Millard Sheets, a painter who taught and was an administrator at Chouinard Art Institute, Otis Art Institute and Scripps College. It was Sheets who brought the legendary avant-gardist Peter Voulkos to California to run the ceramics department at Otis.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2012 | By Leah Ollman
The surfaces of Adam Silverman's new clay pots at Edward Cella feel generated by organic forces over time. Some are crusty and cratered, like hardened lava. Some bear the deep cracks of parched earth. Others look sheathed in creeping lichen. The vessels are relatively conventional in shape (spheres and extrapolations on the gourd), but after layered glazes and multiple firings, they're striking and inventive when it comes to texture and color. Silverman, who trained and previously worked as an architect, describes what he does as "creating an object or skin that holds space.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2011 | By Scarlet Cheng, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The shift in ceramics from craft to art form was a quiet revolution in postwar Southern California. "Common Ground: Ceramics in Southern California 1945-1975" at the American Museum of Ceramic Art in Pomona explores that big topic through the influence of one man, Millard Sheets, a painter who taught and was an administrator at Chouinard Art Institute, Otis Art Institute and Scripps College. It was Sheets who brought the legendary avant-gardist Peter Voulkos to California to run the ceramics department at Otis.
HOME & GARDEN
May 30, 2009 | David A. Keeps
As part of the 1980s L.A. art scene that included David Hockney and Ed Ruscha, Roy McMakin pursued a singular vision: creating functional sculpture based on home furnishings, decorated with a painterly touch. Long before his Domestic Furniture studio produced office pieces for the Getty museum and the set of "The Tonight Show With Jay Leno," McMakin built this cabinet, a witty take on traditional Shaker style.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1993
The American Craft Museum in New York this summer is featuring work by some of Southern California's most prominent ceramic artists. "Gertrud and Otto Natzler: Collaboration/Solitude," the third exhibition in the museum's "Master Artist" series, presents works by a couple known for inventive glazes and refined forms. "Paul Soldner: A Retrospective," organized by Scripps College in Claremont, surveys the work of an innovator who helped turn ceramics into an expressive art form.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2011 | Jori Finkel
Before she died in 1998 at the age of 105, artist Beatrice Wood liked to say that she owed her longevity to "chocolate and young men. " A Santa Monica Museum of Art retrospective of her work does include a campy ceramic sculpture she made on that theme, which shows a regal woman flanked by a phalanx of tiny adoring male figures. But the show, opening Sept. 10, promises to go beyond the sensational, sari-wearing persona that Wood cultivated to find an artist of contradictions and complexities.
NEWS
August 17, 1999 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Laura Andreson, a spirited educator and renowned artist who guided UCLA's ceramics department for nearly 40 years and helped transform the craft of pottery into a lively art, died Monday at the age of 96. Andreson died in her Los Angeles home, said her niece, Deborah Burns. The artist had been in a coma for several days.
HOME & GARDEN
May 30, 2009 | David A. Keeps
As part of the 1980s L.A. art scene that included David Hockney and Ed Ruscha, Roy McMakin pursued a singular vision: creating functional sculpture based on home furnishings, decorated with a painterly touch. Long before his Domestic Furniture studio produced office pieces for the Getty museum and the set of "The Tonight Show With Jay Leno," McMakin built this cabinet, a witty take on traditional Shaker style.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2007 | Claudia Luther, Special to The Times
Otto Natzler, a master glazer and wizard of the kiln who with his wife, Gertrud, created some of the most admired ceramic objects of the 20th century, has died. He was 99. Natzler, who was vital and active into his 90s through a regimen of yoga and physical exercise, died of cancer April 7 at his Los Angeles home, his art dealer, Darrel Couturier, said Tuesday. The Natzlers' elegant and daring works -- she was the potter -- helped elevate ceramics from a "decorative art" to a fine art.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2000 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
A 50-year survey of ceramics by Otto and Gertrud Natzler is more than an opportunity to admire impossibly beautiful pottery. It's a chance to remember the lives and the accomplishments of the Los Angeles-based couple who became world-famous for marrying elegantly simple clay forms with spectacular glazes. And no one knows the story better than Otto Natzler, who lost his wife 29 years ago but is still going strong. "How many other 92-year-olds have you interviewed?"
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2006 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
The San Diego Museum of Art was once a pioneer in its support of the ceramic arts. You wouldn't know it from attending shows there during the past few decades. And you wouldn't guess it flipping through the two catalogs of the collection published in the last dozen years. Neither mentions the exhibiting or collecting of ceramics in its account of the museum's evolution. Out of sight, it seems, out of mind.
MAGAZINE
July 6, 2003 | Jeremy Rosenberg
Adam Silverman sits behind his pottery wheel, legs splayed and bent at the knee, right foot pressing the velocity pedal. His hair is wild, a thundercloud with thickly woven cyclones above skin the color of light desert sand. His arms are tattooed--here an anchor, there a peace sign, here a spider web--and with one hand he grabs a triangular-topped trimming tool and holds it against a damp brown pot.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|