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Outbreak

NATIONAL
November 17, 2013 | By Matt Pearce, Carlos Sadovi and Michelle Manchir
At least six people were killed and dozens more hurt when an unusual November tornado outbreak hopscotched through the Midwest on Sunday, leaving destruction in its wake. Twisters and thunderstorms more reminiscent of spring than fall savaged communities in Illinois, Missouri, Indiana and Kentucky with punishing winds and heavy hail. Survivors poured into hospitals with broken limbs and other wounds from flying debris. An NFL game at Soldier Field in Chicago had to be suspended as football fans evacuated to the concourses, taking shelter from a line of storms.
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BUSINESS
October 18, 2013 | By David Pierson and Tiffany Hsu
LIVINGSTON, Calif. - With his company's poultry sales plunging after a salmonella outbreak that has sickened hundreds of consumers, the head of Foster Farms has apologized for the biggest food safety lapse in the family firm's history. The Merced County producer was thrust into the national spotlight this month when chicken from its three Central California plants was found to be contaminated with a particularly virulent strain of salmonella that has proved resistant to antibiotics.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2013 | By David Pierson
Costco extended a recall of rotisserie chicken products Thursday from a South San Francisco store because of an outbreak of salmonella that has sickened at least 317 people nationwide. The recall targets 13,455 units of Kirkland Signature Foster Farms rotisserie chickens and 638 total units of Kirkland Farm rotisserie chicken soup, rotisserie chicken leg quarters and rotisserie chicken salad purchased between Sept. 24 and Oct. 15. This is in addition to a recall announced Saturday targeting nearly 40,000 pounds of rotisserie chicken products sold between Sept.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2013 | David Pierson, Diana Marcum and Tiffany Hsu
For years, Foster Farms wanted consumers to know its poultry was farm fresh, all natural and, most important, safe to eat. But the ongoing salmonella outbreak linked to three of its central California processing plants is threatening to tarnish the company's image and raising hard questions about gaps in the nation's food safety laws. Considered among the industry's leading producers with state-of-the-art facilities, Foster Farms is an example of how salmonella has become an increasingly potent threat to consumer safety.
NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By David Pierson, Diana Marcum and Tiffany Hsu
For years, Foster Farms wanted consumers to know its poultry was farm fresh, all natural and, most important, safe to eat. But the ongoing salmonella outbreak linked to three of its central California processing plants is threatening to tarnish the company's image and raising hard questions about gaps in the nation's food safety laws. Considered among the industry's leading producers with state-of-the-art facilities, Foster Farms is an example of how salmonella has become an increasingly potent threat to consumer safety.
NATIONAL
October 9, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
The federal government's partial shutdown has led to a partial return of furloughed workers, including some workers needed to investigate an outbreak of salmonella in chicken. One of the ironies of the shutdown is how the politics have been presented. In their drive to end it, lawmakers and others highlight the important work that has been put on hold in the political dispute, especially the loss of key services to families of veterans, consumers and workers whose lives are made better by government inspections.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2013 | By David Pierson
The U.S. Department of Agriculture is threatening to close three California poultry plants operated by Foster Farms blamed for an outbreak of salmonella poisoning that has sickened at least 278 people nationwide. In a letter sent Monday to Foster Farms, the USDA said sanitary conditions at the facilities were so poor that they posed a "serious ongoing threat to public health. " The agency has ordered Foster Farms, one of the nation's largest privately owned poultry producers, to develop a plan by Thursday to clean up the plants.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2013 | By David Pierson and Tiffany Hsu
A salmonella outbreak in Foster Farms chicken contains several antibiotic-resistant strains that may explain an unusually high rate of hospitalization. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday that some salmonella strains found in the outbreak were resistant to one or more drugs -- and that 42% of those sickened have been hospitalized. "That's about double the hospitalization rate of a regular salmonella outbreak," said Caroline Smith DeWaal, food safety director for the Center for Science in the Public Interest.
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