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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1997 | DEBRA CANO
The City Council today will consider eliminating advertising on bus benches in areas where street beautification efforts are taking place. The move would cost the city $100,000 in revenue this fiscal year. However, Outdoor Systems Inc. of Los Angeles, the advertising company, will give the city $100,000 worth of ad-free benches. John Lower, traffic and transportation manager, said advertising on 60 to 150 bus benches could be eliminated. These benches would be city-owned, Lower said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | By Meg James
Old media is still alive and kicking. On its inaugural day of trading, CBS Outdoor Americas -- a billboard business, one of the oldest advertising mediums around -- shot up 5.4% over its initial price to close at $29.50 a share. CBS Corp. offered 20 million shares of the new entity in Friday's initial public offering on the New York Stock Exchange. CBS had priced the stock at $28 a share -- at the high end of its target. ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll “The reaction so far has been positive so we're obviously very pleased,” Jeremy Male, chief executive of CBS Outdoor Americas, said in an interview.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2001
Re "Billboard Sleight of Hand," editorial, Jan. 30: Why do we need billboards at all? Other forms of advertising support the medium they use: newspapers, radio, TV. The billboard companies don't support our roads and freeways. We, the taxpayers, pay the entire expense of those. There's no need to discuss their size or number. Our City Council and Board of Supervisors can just eliminate them. WAUGH SMITH Los Angeles Anyone in L.A. who thinks that giant billboards are a good idea should visit the interchange of the 10 and the 215 freeways near San Bernardino, where huge billboards have all but obliterated what used to be spectacular views of the mountains.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2013 | By David Ng
The Los Angeles City Council voted Wednesday to lift a decadeold ban on outdoor murals. The Times' L.A. Now blog  reported that the council voted 13-2 in favor of removing the ban, though it must still vote to approve new rules regulating the creation of murals. If approved, the new rules would allow artists to create outdoor murals in business and industrial zones. Artists would have to register projects with the city and pay a $60 application fee. In an attempt to control outdoor advertising, the rules would prohibit commercial messages and works must remain for at least two years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1985
Ever see Marvin Braude dance? I have. He looks just as ridiculous as he does in that photo of him with the article on signs (March 19). But everything he's been screaming about for over 15 years--visual pollution and that demon outdoor advertising--is hardly visible among the overwhelming amount of on-site signs on Ventura Boulevard. A careful examination of the photo of the street reveals two off-site outdoor advertisements: one for that devilish division of General Motors, Chevrolet, the other for Marlboro.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2007 | From Reuters
CBS Corp. reported a higher-than-expected 8% rise in quarterly profit Thursday, as strength in its publishing and outdoor advertising businesses overcame a depressed radio division. CBS, which runs the most-watched U.S. TV network, also said it was prepared for a strike by script writers and had programs ready for substitution. The company has been selling assets, including radio stations and TV stations, as it tries to shed lower-margin properties.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1987 | CARRIE BROWN, Times Staff Writer
A 17 1/2-foot-long cylinder of aluminum, foam and fiberglass rotates as up to 4,400 dots of paint a second are being shot onto a vinyl canvas. As the big metal drum goes around, a huge painting--a 14-by-48-foot mural of a panoramic mountain scene--slowly emerges. In 6 hours and 15 minutes, the work is complete. It is a billboard in the making.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1985 | DAVID A. VISE, The Washington Post
Gannett Co. plans to launch a national billboard network next week aimed at making it easier for advertisers to implement national campaigns through the Rochester, N.Y.-based communications company. But even before Gannett's Outdoor Network USA officially begins on Sept. 9, several firms that specialize in buying outdoor-advertising space are attacking the concept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1999 | ELAINE GALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Motorists across Orange County are witnessing an offbeat religious outreach in the form of billboards and bus-shelter posters bearing messages from God. The aim of what's called the God Speaks campaign is to get people to return to religious values--or at least think about them when they're caught in traffic. "Keep using my name in vain, I'll make rush hour longer," reads one of the billboards, all of which are simply signed "God."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2001 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Weighing in on the race for Los Angeles city attorney, an outdoor advertising firm has put up signs on some of its large billboards urging voters to choose Deputy Mayor Rocky Delgadillo. The signs, valued at $40,000, represent the first "independent expenditure" for any of the candidates vying for city offices in the April 10 election, according to the city Ethics Commission. The term refers to spending by a person or group outside a candidate's campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2011 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
A pair of new Los Angeles skyscrapers could dramatically alter the lights of downtown, reigniting the city's long-running fight over outdoor advertising. If developers of the proposed billion-dollar Wilshire Grand project have their way, such colorful images as stars, butterflies and waterfalls would fade in and out along the upper floors of both their planned 45-story hotel and their 65-floor office tower, thanks to thousands of tiny lights embedded in the buildings' surface. Both skyscrapers would see their lowest 10 floors emblazoned with an array of commercial images, from flashing digital signs to streaming "news ribbons.
OPINION
June 3, 2010
Spray paint your name on a freeway underpass and, if you're caught, you'll get fined up to $10,000 and maybe jailed. And you should be. Vandalism is a crime that can undermine communities by turning them into graffiti-ridden dumps. But erect an illegal billboard near the same freeway — or alter a legal sign by turning it around or enlarging it, for example — and you're protected, rather than punished, by state law. Your sign, and your contempt for the law in erecting or altering it, can be as damaging to neighborhood livability as any graffiti, but current law dictates that you can't be fined or otherwise punished for your act. At most, the owners of signs illegally placed near interstate highways and other roads that are part of the federal network can be asked to "cure" their illegal acts.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2010 | Michael Hiltzik
One feature of life in Southern California that's become hard to avoid is the relentless advertising for a weight-loss procedure known as lap-band surgery. You've probably seen the billboards: They feature a willowy blond in a red tank top and the phone number 1-800-GET-THIN in huge red letters. "LOSE WEIGHT WITH THE LAP-BAND!" they say. These billboards blanket Southland freeways like a giant adipose layer. I've counted 17 on one four-mile stretch of Interstate 5 east of downtown Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2009 | David Zahniser
A federal judge refused Monday to halt enforcement of the Los Angeles City Council's newest outdoor advertising law, which bars the installation of new digital billboards and multistory supergraphic signs across the city. In a tentative ruling, U.S. District Judge Audrey B. Collins said Liberty Media Corp. had failed to show a likelihood that it would prevail with its procedural arguments against the month-old ordinance. Liberty had asked Collins to issue an injunction blocking enforcement of the new law and forcing the city to allow 16 new signs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2009 | David Zahniser
Alarmed at the possibility that its temporary ban on new outdoor advertising could be suspended or struck down in court, the Los Angeles City Council decided Wednesday to seek an emergency ordinance to prevent new digital billboards, supergraphics or certain other outdoor signs from going up. The council unanimously scheduled the vote on the new law for Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2009 | Alexandra Zavis
The mysterious felling of roughly two dozen trees near city billboards has provoked finger pointing between state transportation officials and an advertising firm, and added fuel to a heated debate involving outdoor advertising in Los Angeles. Vandals apparently used chain saws to cut back the trees, which had been planted along the 10 and 405 freeways under a California Department of Transportation landscaping initiative.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2007 | Alana Semuels, Times Staff Writer
Blake and Steve Pollack love traffic jams. When there's traffic, people can't help but stare at the advertisements that the Pollacks mount on the sides and backs of big-rigs. The trucks slog up and down Southern California freeways in the mornings, when the traffic is bad, and travel over surface streets during the day, making more traffic as they try to navigate sharp right turns and hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1990 | PHIL WEST
Some people alter billboards, bus shelter signs and bus benches with graffiti. But KACE-FM (103.9) is using the same forums to deliver an anti-graffiti message. The Inglewood-based radio station, in an effort to draw attention to the city's graffiti menace, is bolstering its outdoor advertising campaign this week to spread the message that the community is sick and tired of spray paint and marking pens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2009 | Phil Willon
The Los Angeles Planning Commission postponed action Thursday on a proposed ordinance regulating new billboards and commercial signs in the city. Anti-billboard advocates, community groups and business representatives all urged the delay during a four-hour hearing in City Hall, saying that the proposal was fraught with problems and that more public comment was necessary. The measure would outlaw new billboards, including digital displays, and supergraphics that are hung along the sides of buildings.
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