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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2003 | Kathleen Flynn, Times Staff Writer
Real-estate advertisements, movie release posters, fliers for garage sales and announcements of lost pets all would lose their space on utility poles and other public property under a crackdown proposed by a Los Angeles city councilman. Councilman Greig Smith said he sees the proliferation of illegal signs as something like "broken windows syndrome," in which small problems lead to larger crimes."It eventually leads to blight," Smith said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
A sign company has launched the first independent expenditure campaign in the Los Angeles City Council's 12th District race, providing billboards worth $45,000 to promote the candidacy of Greig Smith. On a leave of absence as chief of staff to Councilman Hal Bernson, Smith is one of six candidates competing in the March 4 election to succeed the incumbent, who is prevented by term limits from seeking reelection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2002 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mark Kudler first looked at the Century Freeway viaduct a decade ago and didn't see concrete. He saw gold. To the billboard entrepreneur, each passing car, each pair of eyes was worth money--$15 million total, he figured. Once Kudler went to work, he wasn't the only one who saw a chance to get rich. A billboard lobbyist asked Kudler for $1 million to help get approval from the city of Lynwood. A competitor promised the city as much as $4 million.
NATIONAL
August 3, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Environmentalists and Atlanta area civic leaders wary of sprawl have complained for years about the huge billboards that dot suburban skylines, criticizing them as enormous eyesores. After the collapse of a billboard Thursday in suburban Snellville that killed three workers, the critics say the signs are dangerous too. The mayor of Snellville called an emergency City Council meeting and demanded that six similar billboards nearby be dismantled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday agreed to begin charging billboard companies an annual fee to pay for the inventory and inspection of signs in the city. Starting Oct. 1, billboard owners will be required to pay the city $315 per sign each year in exchange for a certificate, which must be affixed to each billboard. The program is intended to help city inspectors identify illegal signs, estimated at about 4,000 citywide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2002 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday unanimously rejected a billboard company's demand for $15.6 million in compensation for tearing down a dozen billboards on Santa Monica Boulevard on the Westside. The ads, located on publicly owned medians, are to be removed as part of a $69-million plan to turn the main road and Little Santa Monica Boulevard into one wide, tree-lined thoroughfare between Century City and the San Diego Freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2002 | GARRETT THEROLF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously Tuesday to temporarily ban new billboards in unincorporated areas. Supervisor Yvonne Brathwaite Burke, who proposed the emergency moratorium, said she expected to have the board's support for a permanent ban of such "visual blight" within a year for the 2,653 square miles of unincorporated territory, an area more than twice the size of Rhode Island.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2002 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Anatomically Correct Oscar. He's white & male, just like the guys who win!" booms the billboard at the corner of Highland and Melrose avenues. In all modesty, that's not quite correct. The pale, pudgy 10-foot-tall man shown standing on a pedestal is depicted strategically covering himself with his hands by feminists who are using the billboard to protest perceived bias against women in movie directing, producing and editing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2002 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a billboard company recently installed signs along Los Angeles area freeways without city approval, it not only angered local officials, but also threatened to undo a two-year campaign by the industry to increase its influence at City Hall. During that period, billboard companies contributed tens of thousands of dollars to candidates for local elected office. They provided candidates and council members with free advertising on their huge signs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2002 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dispute over plans for huge billboards in West Hollywood has turned into a debate over whether a developer has paid off neighbors to support his $250-million Sunset Strip project. City Council members will be asked tonight to rescind approval of a proposal by builder Mark Siffin to erect large V-shaped billboards atop high-rise buildings in his Sunset Boulevard development or to place a billboard-rejection referendum on the next citywide ballot.
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