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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1995
I am writing to correct errors in "Gingrich Stirring Troubled Waters" (April 2), concerning San Diego's waste-water treatment and disposal via the ocean outfall. Scott Jenkins is quoted as saying that the outfall's plume often rises and is pushed ashore, insinuating that this is an unhealthy situation. The facts are that the plume stays submerged in deep ocean waters and its influence is never observed even within the kelp beds, let alone the beaches that are 4.5 miles from the discharge point.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2009 | Keith Thursby
Jan Vandersloot, a leading Orange County environmental activist whose causes included the preservation of the Bolsa Chica wetlands, has died. He was 64. Vandersloot died Wednesday at his home in Newport Beach, said his son, Jon, who found his father in his home office. "He gave everything he had 'til his last breath," Jon Vandersloot said. The cause of death has not been determined. Vandersloot, a dermatologist with a practice in Huntington Beach, was one of the founders of the Bolsa Chica Land Trust , which was formed in 1992 to preserve the Bolsa Chica wetlands by acquiring and restoring the area.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1986
A second surfer who believes he became ill after swimming in sewage-contaminated waters off Cardiff State Beach has filed an administrative claim seeking compensation from three public agencies. Peter Eller, 25, is seeking $10 million in damages from San Diego County, the state Regional Water Quality Control Board and the City of Escondido, his attorney, David McKenzie, said Monday at a press conference.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2005 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
Male fish with female characteristics have been discovered in ocean waters off Los Angeles and Orange counties, raising concerns that treated sewage released offshore contains hormone-disrupting compounds that are deforming the sex organs of marine life. Scientists around the world have found sexual abnormalities in frogs, fish, alligators and other wild animals exposed to sewage effluent and industrial contaminants that mimic estrogens and other hormones.
NEWS
February 19, 1992 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Divers working a mile offshore have discovered a second major break in the massive outfall pipe that for more than two weeks has sent as much as 180 million gallons a day of partially treated sewage spewing into the ocean, officials said Tuesday. Underwater teams discovered a "partial joint separation" about 5,800 feet from the rocky cliffs of Point Loma at a depth of 55 feet Sunday and found joint movement in the pipe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1985
As a result of another malfunction in the city of Los Angeles' sewage treatment system, an extra 2.4 million gallons of sewage that received only partial treatment was dumped in Santa Monica Bay on Wednesday. City officials said a mechanical failure at the Hyperion Sewage Treatment Plant near El Segundo forced a 90-minute shutdown of a secondary treatment unit, which removes enough chemicals and solids to make sewage usable for irrigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1987
Electrical troubles forced Los Angeles to divert 4.9 million gallons of treated sewage out the one-mile ocean outfall at the Hyperion treatment plant near El Segundo, the Department of Public Works announced Wednesday. The sewage, which normally would be pumped five miles out to sea, was discharged Tuesday afternoon, a city spokesman said. The effluent was chlorinated and posed no problem for nearby beaches, the spokesman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1989
A two-mile section of a busy oceanfront thoroughfare in Playa del Rey was closed to all traffic Friday in the midst of the rush hour after a broken sewer main caused the roadway above it to sink. The road was expected to be shut down through the weekend, authorities reported. City personnel barricaded all roads leading onto Vista Del Mar between Culver Boulevard and Imperial Highway, said Kevin Walton, a communications supervisor with the Department of Transportation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2000
Finally, scientists shine some new light on the mysterious 1999 beach closure ("Scientists ID Chief Suspects in '99 Closures at Huntington," Nov. 17). UC Irvine researcher Stanley Grant presented an elegant study of the Talbert Marsh and urban runoff and concluded that runoff is not the main culprit. Foul, cried the sanitation districts, challenging the report's conclusion that the agency's five-mile long ocean outfall probably contributed in large measure to the disaster. This should not be about whodunit, or about killing the messengers, but about how we can avoid future crises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1995
While contemplating the results of Measure R and the possible effects on the future of our once-great county I began to speculate on just what type of county we would have today if the same do-nothing mind-set that we have been exposed to in recent months had existed among our political and business leaders in the past. Would they have endorsed the multimillion-dollar ballot issue--in the midst of the Depression--that built the MWD aqueduct that brought Colorado River water to a parched Southern California?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2002 | STANLEY ALLISON, JANET WILSON and MIKE ANTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After spending $5 million on an elaborate study, the Orange County Sanitation District said Wednesday it is no closer to pinpointing what caused the summer-long closure of the Huntington Beach coastline in 1999. The study, conducted by consultants hired by the district, found no substantial evidence that an offshore sewage plume caused the beach pollution. But for the first time the district said it could not rule the plume out as one of the possible causes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Warning signs have been posted at two storm drain outfalls, advising beachgoers to avoid contact with them for a few days. The county's Environmental Health Division put up the warnings at the Kalorama Street and Ash Street outfalls after about 1,500 gallons of untreated sewage spilled into a Ventura storm drain. For about two weeks, after a sewer pipe broke, the sewage spilled into the storm drain on Buena Vista Street at Hemlock Street before workers stopped it Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2001 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If scientists prove that sewage released four miles offshore is migrating back to the beach, health officials would have little choice but to close stretches of Huntington Beach until the problem is fixed, Orange County's top water-quality official said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2001 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Partially treated sewage released daily four miles offshore is creeping back toward Huntington Beach, Orange County Sanitation District scientists said Thursday. Sanitation district tests Nov. 27 revealed a finger-shaped mass of sewage pointing back to a power plant on the shore of Huntington Beach about 1 1/2 miles off the coast. The tests also uncovered surprisingly high bacteria levels right off the beach in the afternoon--a time when tests have not previously been conducted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2000
Finally, scientists shine some new light on the mysterious 1999 beach closure ("Scientists ID Chief Suspects in '99 Closures at Huntington," Nov. 17). UC Irvine researcher Stanley Grant presented an elegant study of the Talbert Marsh and urban runoff and concluded that runoff is not the main culprit. Foul, cried the sanitation districts, challenging the report's conclusion that the agency's five-mile long ocean outfall probably contributed in large measure to the disaster. This should not be about whodunit, or about killing the messengers, but about how we can avoid future crises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | JENNIFER MENA and BRADY MacDONALD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Scientists who spent more than a year studying the causes of the 1999 Huntington Beach closures on Thursday identified two prime suspects: bird waste from a nearby marsh and sewage flowing from a sanitation outfall. The long-awaited report represents the most exhaustive examination of Huntington Beach's shore contamination problem, which kept the city's famous beaches off limits for much of summer 1999 and dealt a blow to its "Surf City" tourist economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1989
For years, regulatory agencies and the courts have prodded the city of Los Angeles toward full secondary treatment of the sewage it dumps into Santa Monica Bay. As a result, the city has a massive sewage disposal modernization program under way and will achieve full secondary treatment of its effluent by 1998. Now, the County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County are fighting the same losing battle that the city waged for so long. The districts have been seeking from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency a waiver--the sort the city has worked under--to exempt about half its effluent from the secondary treatment level required by the Clean Water Act. The county districts have used a two-pronged argument in seeking partial exemption from the federal law. They claim that it would be more effective to work for source reduction--to get industry and other sewage customers to keep toxic metals and other harmful effluent material from getting into the sewage system in the first place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1986 | ERIC BAILEY, Times Staff Writer
In the beginning, Richard and Carol MacManus were, by their own admission, little more than "concerned citizens." Last September, the couple began hearing about a plan to reduce the treatment of 14 million gallons of sewage pumped each day into the sun-dappled seas about a mile off Cardiff State Beach. To the MacManuses, that meant one thing--a dirtier ocean. Alarmed by the news, the Cardiff couple journeyed to San Diego for a hearing on the proposed waiver.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | JENNIFER MENA and BRADY MacDONALD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Scientists who spent more than a year studying the pollution that forced the 1999 Huntington Beach closures said Thursday they have identified two possible culprits: bird waste from a nearby marsh and sewage from a sanitation outfall. The long-awaited report represents the most exhaustive examination of Huntington Beach's shore contamination problem, which kept the city's landmark beaches off limits for much of the summer of 1999 and dealt a blow to its "Surf City" tourist economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1999 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated officials were back at it again Monday trying to find a reason why bacteria levels have shot up again in the ocean off Huntington Beach. "It's baffling, it's just totally baffling," said Michelle Tuchman of the Orange County Sanitation District. Tests taken over the weekend showed elevated levels in the ocean north of the Santa Ana River, prompting worried health officials to post new warnings about potential risks of swimming or surfing from the state beach to the city pier.
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