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Outpost

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NATIONAL
September 22, 2012 | By Mark K. Matthews, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Top NASA officials have picked a leading candidate for the agency's next major mission: construction of an outpost that would send astronauts farther from Earth than they've ever been. Called the gateway spacecraft, it would hover in orbit on the far side of the moon, support a small crew and function as a staging area for future missions to the moon and Mars. At 277,000 miles from Earth, the outpost would be far more remote than the current space station, which orbits a little more than 200 miles above Earth.
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BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
A striking new hotel under construction on the Sunset Strip in West Hollywood will be a swanky outpost of the James, an upscale boutique brand in major urban centers. The 286-room hotel at the southeast corner of Sunset and La Cienega boulevards is part of a $300-million complex under construction at the intersection. The development, known as Sunset La Cienega, will also have apartments, shops and restaurants. Developer CIM Group said it formed a partnership with Denihan Hospitality Group to build the James Los Angeles, which will be the first new ground-up hotel in West Hollywood in three decades.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2010 | By CHRISTOPHER HAWTHORNE, Architecture Critic
The two stories that have dominated the architectural press over the last few weeks -- the unveiling of a winning design for a new American embassy in London, and the death, in a downtown Los Angeles traffic accident, of the 76-year-old Austrian architect Raimund Abraham -- have more in common than just a spot on the calendar. Both are directly connected to the same set of questions: How should an architect approach the task of designing a building to represent his home country abroad?
WORLD
April 12, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
HERAT, Afghanistan -- Taliban insurgents attacked an Afghan outpost near the border with Pakistan on Friday, killing 13 soldiers, according to local officials. The fighting began around dawn and lasted four to five hours, said Wasifullah Wasifi, spokesman for the governor of Kunar province. “One more soldier is missing, so the total may turn out to be 14,” he said. The restive province is often used as an entryway for militants arriving from Pakistan's lawless northwestern area.
WORLD
March 24, 2008 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Among the service members who have died since the conflict began in March 2003, the stories of several have lingered in the minds of Times reporters and photographers, even if they weren't necessarily close to them. -- On June 16, 2007, Pfc. Jacob T. Tracy was standing guard at one of the oddest outposts in Iraq: an abandoned potato chip factory. Because of its commanding view of the outskirts of Baghdad's Sadr City district, the factory had become the fortified headquarters of Charlie Company of the 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2009
Update Dec. 12: This performance has been cancelled due to weather. Outpost for Contemporary Art presents Vlatka Horvat's performance piece "This Here and That There" -- in the swirling shallows of the L.A. River. Viewers are encouraged to come and go during the eight-hour performance, in which Horvat will arrange and rearrange 50 chairs to reflect potential dialogue, conflict and other social tableau among. L.A. River near the Great Heron Gate, Fletcher Drive and Ripple Street, Elysian Valley.
NEWS
October 5, 2004
I biked with friend David Beltran from Death Valley to Whitney Portal and then hiked to the top of Mt. Whitney with David and another friend, Renato Medina. The weather varied from 122 degrees in Death Valley to snow conditions at the Outpost campsite. It was a grueling but wonderful experience. Jose Colon Whittier
NATIONAL
February 11, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
A former Californian was awarded the nation's highest military honor on Monday for his efforts against a 2009 Taliban attack on his Afghanistan outpost that U.S. officials have described as tactically indefensible. Former Staff Sgt. Clinton Romesha, 31, received the Medal of Honor from President Obama during a nationally televised ceremony Monday. Romesha is the fourth living recipient who fought in Iraq or Afghanistan. Seven others who fought in those conflicts have received the medal posthumously . Romesha grew up in Lake City in Northern California, near the Oregon border, and now lives in Minot, N.D., with his wife and three children, all of whom attended Monday's ceremony.
NEWS
November 1, 1999
I was thrilled as a Montrose merchant with your article featuring Montrose (" 'Lulu of a Street," Oct. 22). I have also been a resident in the area and shopped here in the 1960s, long before I owned a business in town. However, in reading the article carefully, with great anticipation of seeing my store mentioned, I was mystified to see that your staff writer entirely neglected the third block in the "trip down Honolulu." The 2400 block houses three more wonderful restaurants, two businesses that could have really used the press.
WORLD
March 2, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - Late last year, before leaving Forward Operating Base Tillman for the last time, U.S. troops took apart every inch of the remote outpost near the border with Pakistan, from the dirt-packed barricades to the flat-screen TVs in the intelligence center. Mohibullah Samim, the governor of Paktika province, where the base was located, called it a waste. "I was against dismantling it," Samim said. "It would have been better to hand it over to the Afghan army to keep the border area safe.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2013 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
In ever-evolving Palm Springs, a downtown inn will be converted to a Hard Rock Hotel as the desert city continues to crank up its appeal for younger, hipper visitors. By year end, the Hotel Zoso on Indian Canyon Drive will be turned into a 160-room Hard Rock, where guests can borrow electric Fender guitars to noodle on in their rooms or check out a fancy sound mixer to practice their DJ skills. Hard Rock brand hotels, casinos and restaurants operate across the nation and in several countries.
NATIONAL
February 11, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
A former Californian was awarded the nation's highest military honor on Monday for his efforts against a 2009 Taliban attack on his Afghanistan outpost that U.S. officials have described as tactically indefensible. Former Staff Sgt. Clinton Romesha, 31, received the Medal of Honor from President Obama during a nationally televised ceremony Monday. Romesha is the fourth living recipient who fought in Iraq or Afghanistan. Seven others who fought in those conflicts have received the medal posthumously . Romesha grew up in Lake City in Northern California, near the Oregon border, and now lives in Minot, N.D., with his wife and three children, all of whom attended Monday's ceremony.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
The Outpost An Untold Story of American Valor Jake Tapper Little, Brown: 652 pp., $29.99   Into the Fire A Firsthand Account of the Most Extraordinary Battle in the Afghan War Dakota Meyer and Bing West Random House, 239 pp., $27 When news broke that the American Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, had been attacked and four Americans killed, two questions dominated the immediate postmortem: Why wasn't there better...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2012 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
BARSTOW - Vicky Davis pulled in a hundred grand a year installing high-end corporate phone systems until the recession hit and work dried up. Now she's racing to find a job before she drains her retirement savings. She doesn't have much time to keep tabs on the upcoming election. She spends 10 hours at day at Barstow Community College, training to be a utility technician for one of the giant solar facilities sprouting in the Mojave Desert. But Davis has heard enough to be worried.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Nurse practitioner Matt Tomlin steps into a small patient exam room, logs on to a computer and pulls up a formidable list of ailments for the 57-year-old woman sitting in front of him. Hypertension. Diabetes. Congestive heart failure. Obesity. Anxiety disorder. Multiple heart attacks. Rosemary Ricks, hunched over in a bright yellow dress, moans and describes a fall she took earlier in the week. Dropping her head in her hands, she says she can't take the pain and needs some of her prescriptions refilled.
MAGAZINE
May 2, 1993
In this community, the westernmost outpost of middle-class Southern culture, The Times is uniformly viewed as an instrument of the liberal press. Imagine our surprise at finding King's excellent article that critically and accurately psychoanalyzed our new President. King's cynical but incisive essay cut through to the soul of Clinton, revealing an insecure, cloying man, further agonized by an outspoken feminist wife. The President's first two months of political self-destruction portend a bleak future for the next four years and give little hope for the positive changes he promised during his campaign.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2008 | S. Irene Virbila, Times Restaurant Critic
5-for-5 Wine Socials at NeoMeze NeoMeze in Old Town Pasadena offers a contemporary take on the Middle Eastern custom of meze. Tuesday through Thursday from 6 to 8 p.m., sommelier David Haskell (late of Bin 8945 in WeHo) selects five wines for $25 and pairs them with small dishes at $5 each. NeoMeze, 20 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena; (626) 793-3010; www.neomeze.com Father's Office Los Angeles It's finally open -- the newer, bigger, L.A.-Culver City outpost of the diminutive Father's Office in Santa Monica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2012 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
Arcadia and Monrovia had one. So did Rosemead. San Gabriel's was named for its historic mission. Alhambra's once boasted the largest hangar in the world. They were built in an era when Los Angeles County imagined itself to be "in the vanguard of vanguards in matters of aviation," as a supervisor said in 1929. But the airports of the San Gabriel Valley have all but vanished. In their places are shopping centers, car dealerships and housing tracts. Now, an aviation group is trying to make sure the last one doesn't disappear as well: tiny El Monte Airport sees no commercial use and is hardly known outside the private pilot community.
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