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Ovarian Cancer

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NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Melissa Healy/Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Women who underwent at least one vitro fertilization cycle in an effort to become pregnant were almost twice as likely to develop ovarian cancer as women who experienced infertility but did not get such treatment, say the authors of a large Dutch study published this week. The study  is one of the largest conducted to date and tracked women for roughly 15 years after their first IVF cycle. Its findings appear to contradict those of an even larger Danish study published in 2009, which found no increase in cancer risk among women who had undergone infertility treatment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
March 11, 2014 | Melissa Healy
Obesity is probably a factor in some of the almost 22,000 new diagnoses of ovarian cancer that will be handed out this year to American women, a new study says. The finding adds ovarian cancer, the deadliest of the gynecological malignancies, to a growing list of diseases linked to carrying far too much weight. Research has found obesity to contribute to a person's risk for a wide range of illnesses, including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancers of the breast, colon, pancreas and esophagus.
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NEWS
February 16, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
As many as one-third of women with ovarian cancer have high levels of platelets in their blood, which is linked to worse outcomes, researchers reported Wednesday. Platelets are components of cells that clump together to stop bleeding. Having an excessively high level of platelets is called thrombocytosis. Doctors have long known that thrombocytosis is associated with cancer. In the new study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine , researchers at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston analyzed data from 619 women with ovarian cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2014 | By Nardine Saad
Angelina Jolie knows that she can appear to be a bit austere in the public eye, but when she's at home, the brunet beauty says, she relaxes and makes sure to have fun. The 38-year-old actress-director, who appears in character for "Maleficent" on this week's issue of Entertainment Weekly, told the mag she's a different person at home. "Outside my home I can be somewhat serious," Jolie said ( via People). "We laugh and we play, and I'm light again, and I'm a kid again, and I'm loving and soft again, because they've brought that back in my life.
SCIENCE
March 11, 2014 | Melissa Healy
Obesity is probably a factor in some of the almost 22,000 new diagnoses of ovarian cancer that will be handed out this year to American women, a new study says. The finding adds ovarian cancer, the deadliest of the gynecological malignancies, to a growing list of diseases linked to carrying far too much weight. Research has found obesity to contribute to a person's risk for a wide range of illnesses, including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancers of the breast, colon, pancreas and esophagus.
NEWS
December 13, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Ovarian cancer is one of the most feared diseases because the tumor often produces no symptoms and the disease is often detected at an advanced stage. Despite vigorous research, there are no good screening tests that can be recommended for all women on a regular basis, such as there is with breast cancer and mammography. And that is unlikely to change anytime soon. In a study reported Monday, researchers used a mathematical model to predict that death rates would fall by only about 11% from their current levels if women were to undergo regular ovarian-cancer screening with the best available technology.
NEWS
November 8, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Monthly shots of a cancer vaccine produced encouraging results in a small, very early trial of 26 women with metastatic breast or ovarian cancer (cancer that has spread to other sites around the body), most of whom already had had three or more rounds of chemotherapy. Among the 12 breast cancer patients, median survival time was 13.7 months and one patient was still alive at 37 months, when the paper was written up. Four remained stable during the course of the trial. Among the 14 ovarian cancer patients, median survival was 15 months.
NEWS
December 29, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Doctors and patients eager for better ways to treat advanced ovarian cancer were encouraged by two new studies showing that adding Avastin to traditional chemotherapy drugs allowed women with the disease to live a few months before their cancer returned or worsened. The two large , international studies credited Avastin with providing an additional 3.8 months and 3.6 months of “progression-free survival.” (The reports in Thursday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine weren't able to say whether the women who took Avastin lived longer overall.)
SCIENCE
August 27, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
A two-step process that begins by looking for a sudden change in a cancer marker may hold the key to detecting ovarian cancer earlier in its development, when this often-lethal cancer is easier to treat successfully, says a new study published in the journal Cancer. The study used a growing body of research on ovarian cancer to devise a strategy to identify women who need more intensive monitoring and not raise alarms or increase invasive surgery among women who are not likely to have developed the disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2013 | By Christie DZurilla, This post has been corrected, as detailed below.
Pierce Brosnan 's daughter Charlotte has died of ovarian cancer, the same disease that took her mother, Cassandra Harris, in 1991. She was 41. "On June 28 at 2 p.m. my darling daughter Charlotte Emily passed on to eternal life, having succumbed to ovarian cancer," Brosnan , 60, said in a statement to People . She was surrounded by her husband, her two children and her two brothers. Charlotte had battled the disease for three years. PHOTOS: Notable deaths 2013 "Charlotte fought her cancer with grace and humanity, courage and dignity.
OPINION
February 6, 2014
Re "The pope, the pill and the court," Opinion, Jan. 30 Malcolm Potts' claims about contraception are not uncontested. Whether nuns are prescribed hormonal medication has nothing to do with any church teaching on contraception. It is a matter between a nun and her doctor based on her risk factors and health needs. As U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops spokeswoman Sister Mary Ann Walsh pointed out, "There are risks with the pill just as there are risks with doing nothing with regard to uterine and ovarian cancer.
NATIONAL
December 24, 2013 | By Saba Hamedy
Brenda Schmitz and her youngest son, Max, then 2 years old, shared a favorite song: "Over the Rainbow. " At the time, Schmitz and her family hadn't seen rain - let alone a rainbow - for five weeks when the wife and mother of four was hospitalized at Mercy Medical Center in Des Moines for ovarian cancer. But on the day of her death, in September 2011, a large, bright double rainbow cast across the sky. Her husband, David, said this was the first but certainly not the last time Schmitz would give her family signs that she was watching over them.
SCIENCE
September 26, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Examining the molecular profiles of tumors from 12 different types of cancers, scientists working with the National Institutes of Health-backed Cancer Genome Atlas said Thursday they had found striking similarities between tumors originating in different organs. Their discoveries, made possible by improvements in sequencing technologies and computing methods, could herald a day when cancers are treated based on their genetic profiles, rather than on their tissue of origin, said UC Santa Cruz biomolecular engineer Josh Stuart , a participant in the project and coauthor of a commentary discussing its findings released Thursday by the journal Nature Genetics . Eventually, such a shift in thinking could lead researchers to new treatments for hard-to-treat cancers, Stuart said, in an interview with the Los Angeles Times.
SCIENCE
August 27, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
A two-step process that begins by looking for a sudden change in a cancer marker may hold the key to detecting ovarian cancer earlier in its development, when this often-lethal cancer is easier to treat successfully, says a new study published in the journal Cancer. The study used a growing body of research on ovarian cancer to devise a strategy to identify women who need more intensive monitoring and not raise alarms or increase invasive surgery among women who are not likely to have developed the disease.
SCIENCE
July 30, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
Women, wouldn't you like to know your precise risk of developing breast cancer, ovarian cancer and endometrial cancer? And wouldn't you like to know what changes you could make in your life to reduce that risk? Researchers from the National Cancer Institute would like to help you. They've just published a study in the journal PLOS Medicine that takes a significant step toward that goal. Ruth Pfeiffer , a senior investigator in the National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, and colleagues focused on the predictive value of more than a dozen variables, including a woman's body mass index , number of children she has, how long she took birth control pills, whether she used hormone therapy to treat symptoms of menopause, family history of gynecological cancers, and use of cigarettes and alcohol.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2013 | By Christie DZurilla, This post has been corrected, as detailed below.
Pierce Brosnan 's daughter Charlotte has died of ovarian cancer, the same disease that took her mother, Cassandra Harris, in 1991. She was 41. "On June 28 at 2 p.m. my darling daughter Charlotte Emily passed on to eternal life, having succumbed to ovarian cancer," Brosnan , 60, said in a statement to People . She was surrounded by her husband, her two children and her two brothers. Charlotte had battled the disease for three years. PHOTOS: Notable deaths 2013 "Charlotte fought her cancer with grace and humanity, courage and dignity.
HEALTH
November 13, 2006 | From Times wire reports
Younger women with ovarian cancer have better survival rates than older patients, even if they have surgery to conserve their fertility, scientists say. A new study shows that 59% of women diagnosed between the ages of 30 and 60 were still alive five years later, compared with only 35% of older women with the illness.
SCIENCE
June 7, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The cancer drug Avastin extends progression-free survival by 39% in ovarian cancer patients, a significant improvement in a cancer that has proved extremely difficult to treat. Some oncologists are already using Avastin — which is widely and successfully used for lung, colon and breast tumors — to treat ovarian cancer that has recurred, but such use has never been formally studied. The new study, reported Sunday at a Chicago meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, is also the first to use the drug as first-line therapy for ovarian cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
In the course of our country's history, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has bestowed coveted protection on many strange and wondrous inventions: the three-legged pantyhose (in case one leg runs), the sealed, circular peanut butter-and-jelly sandwich, the motorized ice cream cone. And of course, the human gene. The human gene? How is that even possible? Could you patent a cat's whiskers? A cloud formation? A comb-over for a balding man? (Ah, well, yes, there is a comb - over patent out there somewhere.)
BUSINESS
June 14, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court ruled that human genes are a product of nature and cannot be patented and held for profit, a decision that medical experts said will lead to more genetic testing for cancers and other diseases and to lower costs for patients. In a unanimous ruling Thursday, the nine justices declared that human genes are not an invention, so they cannot be claimed as a type of private property. The decision invalidates a Utah company's patents on two genes that are linked to breast and ovarian cancer, and is likely to lead to several thousand other gene patents being tossed as well.
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