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Ovarian Cancer

BUSINESS
June 9, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Alza Corp.'s Doxil chemotherapy drug should be approved for expanded use as a treatment for ovarian cancer, the advisory panel for the Food and Drug Administration said. Doxil was cleared in the U.S. in 1995 for treating Kaposi's sarcoma, a cancer most often associated with AIDS.
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NEWS
March 21, 2001 | From Associated Press
Taking estrogen for 10 years or more after menopause doubled women's risk of fatal ovarian cancer, says a new study that adds to the confusion facing millions of Americans debating whether to use the hormone. Estrogen users shouldn't panic: Ovarian cancer is rare enough that few estrogen users died despite the increased risk, especially compared to bigger killers, such as heart disease, that estrogen might help, experts cautioned. Also, most of the women studied used estrogen alone.
NEWS
December 30, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved the use of the drug taxol for the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer, while researchers held out hope that it might eventually be effective in earlier stages of the disease and against other kinds of cancers. Health officials cautioned, however, that while studies show the drug can prolong life for some ovarian cancer patients, taxol is not considered a cure.
NEWS
December 26, 1991 | JEANNE KASSLER M.D., AMERICAN HEALTH MAGAZINE
Ovarian cancer has recently been thrust into the limelight. First came comedian Gilda Radner's illness and death in 1989. Then "thirtysomething" character Nancy Weston endured a two-year prime-time battle with the disease. The attendant publicity has increased our awareness of ovarian cancer--and spawned confusion over just how women should respond to the threat.
SCIENCE
January 5, 2006 | Jonathan Bor, Baltimore Sun
Doctors have revived a 50-year-old method of delivering chemotherapy, reporting that infusions through the abdominal wall can add more than a year of life to patients with advanced cases of ovarian cancer. On the down side, the treatment produced side effects so unpleasant that about half the patients stopped it early.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
When British researchers reported recently on a new method for early detection of ovarian cancer, gynecologists' offices were flooded with telephone calls. Women wanted to know where they could get the special ultrasound test. Consciousness about ovarian cancer is at an all-time high, thanks partly to "thirtysomething's" television dramatization of Nancy Weston's battle with the disease and to the 1989 death of actress Gilda Radner.
HEALTH
March 26, 2001 | From Washington Post
Women who take the hormone estrogen for 10 years or more after menopause substantially increase their risk of dying of ovarian cancer compared with women who do not take the hormone, according to a study released Tuesday. In the American Cancer Society study of more than 211,000 post-menopausal women, those with any history of using hormone replacement therapy had a somewhat higher death rate from ovarian cancer than nonusers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Doctors have found one small bit of good news for women who inherit a genetic susceptibility to ovarian cancer: Their form of the disease is less aggressive than that in women who do not have a genetic susceptibility but still get ovarian cancer. Women who are born with this tendency, which results from a flaw in a gene called BRCA1, face about a 65% lifetime risk of getting ovarian cancer and an 85% risk of breast cancer. There is a 95% risk they will get one or the other. Dr. Stephen C.
HEALTH
September 18, 2000 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Ovarian cancer has long been among the most feared diseases among women. And rightly so. It's often detected in a late stage. And the disease is very hard to cure once it has spread beyond the ovaries. An estimated 23,100 U.S. women will be diagnosed with the disease this year and about 14,000 will die, according to the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance.
HEALTH
March 12, 2001 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Aspirin's potential as an ovarian cancer preventive gained support last week, with yet another study suggesting it may reduce a woman's risk of the deadly disease. The findings, while limited in scope, are generating excitement because currently only oral contraceptives are known to reduce risk. Such research is particularly important because ovarian cancer produces vague symptoms, often leading to a diagnosis when the cancer is already advanced. Each year, about 23,000 U.S.
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