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Overbooking

TRAVEL
June 11, 1995 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
United flight 1069 out of Medford, Ore., on May 24 could have been a flight like any other flight. But while we boarded, a storm sneaked up on us. This caused the pilot to delay takeoff while ominous gray clouds rolled past, and that in turn caused me to do something I'd never done in 25 years of flying. I read my entire ticket folder.
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TRAVEL
January 1, 1995 | JAMES T. YENCKEL, WASHINGTON POST
It's the height of holiday madness and you're headed for the airport. Fighting the traffic, you reach the terminal just in time--only to find that the airline has oversold your flight. You end up getting bumped from the plane and left behind to wait for a later flight--maybe a much later one. This may sound like bad news in the midst of the year-end festivities, but to some passengers it's actually good news.
TRAVEL
October 30, 1994 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER; Reynolds travels anonymously at the newspaper's expense, accepting no special discounts or subsidized trips. To reach him, write Travel Insider, Los Angeles Times, Times Mirror Square, Los Angeles 90053.
What does it mean when a hotel offers you a chance to "guarantee" or "assure" your room by giving your credit card number in advance? Most travelers presume it means a room in the hotel will be held in their names, no matter what. After all, the vast majority of reservations do work out that way. But not all. Overrun on a convention week or otherwise caught off guard, most hotels overbook now and then, and end up telling guests that their "guaranteed" rooms have been given to someone else.
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | GLENN KESSLER, NEWSDAY
The cabin lights were dimmed as the USAir jet made its descent toward Boston's Logan Airport. Flight attendant Janet Devlin sat down in her jump seat, looked up, and saw an astonishing sight. Several members of the Boston Bruins hockey team, which had chartered the flight, were standing in the cockpit watching the landing, apparently at the captain's invitation. Devlin was "speechless," she recounted in a report she submitted to USAir about the May 11, 1991, flight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1992 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After declaring a tactical alert to quell a Christmas Day melee at the Hollywood Palladium, Los Angeles police on Saturday blamed the disturbance on the club's practice of overselling tickets, which was recently condemned by a city zoning board. About 130 officers, 60 of them in riot gear, responded to reports of a shooting at 11 p.m. Friday that left two men injured at the Sunset Boulevard club.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1992 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As travelers scrounged for the last of the half-price airline tickets Friday, tired and angry travel agents cheered the sale's end. Despite the surge in ticket buying, the fare promotion cut deeply into agent commissions and added to the costs of doing business. It was yet another blow to an industry already suffering from the downturn in the economy, airline company bankruptcies and past fare wars.
TRAVEL
June 16, 1991 | PETER S. GREENBERG
You're booked for a flight. You even have your seat assignment. But when you get to the airport, you're confronted with a long line of nervous passengers and a gate agent who announces that your flight has been oversold. You plead. You protest. After all, you have a confirmed reservation. It's no use. The airline doesn't have a seat for you. You've been "bumped." What rights, if any, do you have? Actually, quite a few. But first, it might be helpful to define what bumping isn't .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1991 | DANIEL S. GREENBERG, Daniel S. Greenberg is editor and publisher of Science & Government Report, a Washington-based newsletter
As litigation champ of the world, the United States rarely lags in inventive breakthroughs in jurisprudence, but now there's a challenge: A judge in Germany has cut the bill of a patient who spent 2 1/2 hours of involuntary waiting-room time during three scheduled visits to the doctor. If not one of the great moments in medico-legal affairs, the decision surely merits note as a counter to the teeth-clenching delays so often experienced in doctors' waiting rooms.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1990 | From Associated Press
Airlines can be sued for damages for selling tickets that are subject to bumping when flights are overbooked, a federal court ruled. William D. West, a patent lawyer from Helena, Mont., planned a trip to Virginia on a Northwest Airlines flight in 1986 but was told the flight was overbooked. He put the trip off for two weeks and went to court with a lawsuit seeking punitive damages. The 9th U.S.
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