Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOwens River
IN THE NEWS

Owens River

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Department of Water and Power has begun the court-ordered construction of a project to send water flowing into a 62-mile stretch of the Lower Owens River, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said Thursday. The project will reverse damage to the river's environment caused by L.A.'s diversion of water from the Owens Valley to Southern California. The courts have fined the city $5,000 a day since September for delays -- or $645,000 -- and another $2.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 26, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Southern Californians are facing not one drought but three, interconnected yet distinct, each bringing its own hazards and each requiring its own emergency and long-term responses. The first drought is regional, caused by the lack of rain in our own mountains and our own backyards. In normal winters - or rather those we have come to accept as normal - storms blow south from the Gulf of Alaska, churning in a counterclockwise direction and keeping much of their stored water in the air until they move inland from the west and run smack into the San Gabriel Mountains.
Advertisement
OPINION
September 18, 2002
Re the Sept. 13 letter from Dominick Rubalcava on the L.A. Department of Water and Power's "commitment" to the Owens Valley, please remember that this commitment is still to take every drop of water possible. No significant DWP environmental project in the Owens Valley came voluntarily. Only litigation or its threat has caused change. Locally, for 90 years, we have attempted negotiation, with little result except more delay. The lower Owens River re-watering is for damage started in 1970.
OPINION
November 5, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Owensmouth Avenue runs just to the east of Canoga Park High School, over the spot where Bell Creek and Arroyo Calabasas join to form the Los Angeles River. The whole area was once called Owensmouth, named by Los Angeles Times Publisher Harrison Gray Otis and others who had bought up San Fernando Valley land with the knowledge that its value would increase when it became, in essence, the new mouth of the Owens River, a sparkling torrent of Eastern Sierra snowmelt that gathered and dried up in a shallow desert lake but would soon flow to farms and homes in the growing city hundreds of miles to the southwest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2003 | Louis Sahagun and Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writers
The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power announced Tuesday that it had tentatively agreed to restore steady water flows to the long depleted Owens River within two years. Formal approval of the agreement by the DWP's board of directors is expected today. The announcement, with which the DWP hopes to resolve a lawsuit against it, will probably halt a series of delays in launching one of the most ambitious river restorations ever attempted in the arid West.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2004 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
Environmentalists and the City of Los Angeles have filed a court agreement that calls for the L.A. Department of Water and Power to start releasing water into parched stretches of the Owens River by the fall of next year. The deadlines represent the latest attempt to get the city to move ahead with a long-standing plan to return water to lower portions of the river, which were sucked dry by water diversions 90 years ago.
SPORTS
March 29, 2002 | PETE THOMAS
The last time I was on the lower Owens River I felt totally removed from civilization. I was on a drift boat with guide Tom Loe and one of his fly-fishing clients. We were surrounded throughout the trip by willows, cottonwoods and wild rose, which lined the banks so thickly that we seemed in our own little world. The only thing visible beyond this world, over the tops of the trees, were the snow-covered peaks of the Eastern Sierra.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2005 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
After chastising the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power for "piddling around," an Inyo County Superior Court judge ruled Friday that the agency should face sanctions for missing a series of deadlines to restore a 62-mile stretch of the Lower Owens River. "It appears that DWP needs the threat of immediate sanctions before it gets busy" on the restoration effort, Judge Lee E. Cooper said. Proposed sanctions will be considered at a hearing scheduled for July 25.
SPORTS
May 4, 2001 | PETE THOMAS
It's one of the most spectacular opening days imaginable. The surface of this Eastern Sierra town's namesake lake is surprisingly smooth, mirroring wispy clouds floating across a bright blue sky. Making a splash, here and there, are some of the largest trout anyone can remember during a Crowley Lake opener. Thousands of fishermen are kicking off another season in fine style; they can't ask for anything more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2006 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
Nearly a century after Los Angeles' water demands reduced it to a parched wisp of a river, a 62-mile-stretch of the Lower Owens is about to make a comeback in one of the most ambitious river restoration efforts ever attempted. The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, fulfilling a long-delayed commitment, plans to put water back into the river on Dec. 6 in hopes of transforming its puddles and ponds into a biological superhighway of trees, fish, waterfowl, songbirds, elk and deer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
LONE PINE, Calif. - An Inyo County official and an environmental activist stepped into wobbly kayaks on Saturday to gauge the prospects of developing a "paddling experience" that would float people down the eastern Sierra Nevada's Lower Owens River. To Larry Freilich, Inyo County Water Department mitigation manager, and George Wolfe, founder of L.A. River Expeditions, the Lower Owens' lazy loops, oxbows and wetlands - habitat for elk, bobcats and waterfowl - and rugged, wide-open scenery are reason enough to make such voyages worthwhile.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2013 | By Doug Smith
There's been a lot written on improving the concrete, channelized, litter-strewn Los Angeles River. No doubt the river could use some improving, but there's also a lot of misplaced nostalgia. To hear some people talk about restoring the river, you'd think it was once the mighty Mississippi with flotillas of steamboats churning their way upstream. Anyone who grew up here long ago, as I did, knows the natural condition of the L.A. River - dry. As a kid searching the river for polliwogs in the 1950s, I could bound from one side to the other without getting my feet wet. Broken glass and debris would sit all year on the baked concrete waiting for the winter to wash it away.
SCIENCE
August 2, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
The state Department of Fish and Wildlife on Friday that said it is investigating why hundreds of smallmouth bass have been found floating belly up in a stretch of the Lower Owens River just south of the eastern Sierra community of Lone Pine. “We are working with our own biologists and multiple agencies to determnine what happened and why,” Fish and Wildlife Lt. William Bailey said. “We're also looking at permits and agreements governing uses of that river.” The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, which manages the Lower Owens River, believes the fish suffocated from a lack of dissolved oxygen caused by mud and debris flows triggered by unusually heavy rains and flash-flooding in the Owens Valley region during the week of July 22. However, local environmentalists and fishing enthusiasts point out that the inclement weather coincided with scheduled maintenance and repair work that required draining a five-mile-long section of the nearby Los Angeles Aqueduct.
OPINION
June 10, 2013 | Jim Newton
After a campaign of smart politics but small ideas, Eric Garcetti is poised to take the office that he won last month. As he does, here's an item worthy of his agenda: Make peace with the Owens Valley. Residents of the Owens Valley rely heavily on Los Angeles; some even live in houses that they lease from the city's Department of Water and Power, by far the largest landowner in the picturesque towns of the Eastern Sierra. And yet, many residents are understandably resentful of Los Angeles.
OPINION
November 19, 2012 | Jim Newton
Los Angeles owes an old debt to the Owens Valley. It was there, a century ago, that representatives of this ambitious city quietly bought up water rights from unsuspecting farmers and then diverted the Owens River into a newly built aqueduct that brought Sierra snowmelt south and made Los Angeles possible. Owens Lake was emptied so that Los Angeles might prosper. But how far does that debt extend? Is Los Angeles forever on the hook for the actions of its forefathers? And to the extent that it is possible to restore some of the Owens Valley, what would make it whole?
OPINION
July 28, 2011
A no-flowin' Owens Re " Choking the Lower Owens ," July 25 I beg to differ with the negative assessment of the Owens River restoration project. I agree with lead scientist Mark Hill, who pointed out the success of the creation of 3,000 acres of water and wetlands. With 108 identified species of birds visiting the area and the multitude of fish being supported by the life generated by the water, I think the project has been extremely successful. I will survey my science students when they return to class, and I am sure they will concur.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2003 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
Fed up with a series of delays, the state attorney general's office on Thursday filed a lawsuit to force the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power to restore water to the Owens River, as required under a 6-year-old agreement to stop environmental damage to the surrounding countryside caused by the city's groundwater pumping. "This project will provide long-needed restoration of habitats, wildlife and recreation in the Owens Valley," Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer said.
SPORTS
May 1, 1996 | Pete Thomas
For most, there was no escaping the madness on opening day of the Eastern Sierra trout season. More than 5,000 anglers flocked to the shores and onto the water at Crowley Lake early Saturday morning, launching an attack so thorough and effective, they might as well have been dropping depth charges. And things weren't much different elsewhere. So much Power Bait was cast into the local creeks and rivers, it's a wonder they didn't dam up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The largest river restoration ever attempted in the West — intended to support a cornucopia of wildlife and outdoor activities — has left a 62-mile stretch of the Lower Owens so overrun with cattails, cane and bulrushes that it may take decades to bring them under control. Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa turned a knob in 2006 that opened a diversion dam gate about 235 miles north of the city, putting water back into a river essentially left dry after its flows of Sierra snowmelt were diverted to the Los Angeles Aqueduct in 1913.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2008 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
As blizzards whipped across nearby High Sierra peaks, ecologist William Platts lifted off in a helicopter here and headed north, about 1,000 feet above a river that looked as if it were throwing a tantrum. Beneath him, the squiggle of green was overflowing its banks, inundating a patchwork of oxbows, marshlands, forests and sagebrush. Culverts were nearly filled to capacity, and mats of dislodged tules and muck hurtled down the river.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|