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NEWS
April 2, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Jack Riley tries to get home when he sees a dust plume rising off Owens Lake, the dry salt pan created by Los Angeles' thirst for Sierra Nevada water. The plume means swirling gray clouds of alkaline dust will soon envelop this little town, making driving dangerous and breathing unpleasant. "It's like flour," said Riley, a retired Los Angeles Department of Water and Power employee. "I just stay indoors, lock the windows, and hook up to the oxygen."
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NEWS
April 2, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Jack Riley tries to get home when he sees a dust plume rising off Owens Lake, the dry salt pan created by Los Angeles' thirst for Sierra Nevada water. The plume means swirling gray clouds of alkaline dust will soon envelop this little town, making driving dangerous and breathing unpleasant. "It's like flour," said Riley, a retired Los Angeles Department of Water and Power employee. "I just stay indoors, lock the windows, and hook up to the oxygen."
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NEWS
April 2, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK
Why does Owens Lake generate severe dust storms when other dry lake beds scattered through the desert don't? Owens has been dry only about 60 years, and a large pool of brine still lies just below the surface. Most of the time, a thin crust seals the surface salts and clay silt on the lake bed. But when rains wet the salt pan, followed by dry, cold winter winds, the crust ruptures.
NEWS
April 2, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK
Why does Owens Lake generate severe dust storms when other dry lake beds scattered through the desert don't? Owens has been dry only about 60 years, and a large pool of brine still lies just below the surface. Most of the time, a thin crust seals the surface salts and clay silt on the lake bed. But when rains wet the salt pan, followed by dry, cold winter winds, the crust ruptures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1990 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since volunteers from the Oxnard Historical Society stopped showing up to run the city's historical museum, hundreds of faded photos, yellowing newspaper clips and aging mementos have been collecting dust in the basement of the Carnegie Art Museum. Old yearbooks, graying posters and stiff Army uniforms--representing 87 years of city history--have been kept in glass cases for more than a decade.
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