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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2010
'Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole' MPAA rating: PG for some sequences of scary action Running time: 1 hour, 31 minutes Playing: In general release
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SCIENCE
February 24, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
As shy creatures of quiet places, federally threatened northern spotted owls have little tolerance for the larger, more aggressive barred owls moving into their ancient forests in the northwestern United States. Trouble is, ousted spotted owls are colonizing less suitable habitat elsewhere, lowering the probability of successfully producing young, according to a study by U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Forest Service biologists recently published in the journal Ecology. The situation has become so desperate that federal biologists are considering efforts to remove, or kill, some of the barred owls occupying the old growth forests of Oregon, Washington and Northern California, Charles Yackulic, USGS research statistician and lead author of the study, said.
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NEWS
August 17, 2004 | David Lukas
[STRIX NEBULOSA] Biologists who conducted the first comprehensive wildlife survey of Yosemite National Park in 1915 made a startling discovery: a nesting pair of great gray owls. This remarkable Arctic owl had never been found breeding south of Canada and only rarely wandered into the United States. Today, more extensive surveys indicate that 40 to 50 great grays live in California.
OPINION
February 2, 2014 | Doyle McManus
Most members of the House of Representatives have a "wall of fame" in their office - meant-to-impress photographs of the often obscure incumbent with presidents, senators and hometown sports heroes. Henry Waxman's wall has bills, dozens of them - bills he helped turn into law, along with the pens that six presidents used to sign them, going back to Jimmy Carter. There's the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act of 1984, which virtually invented the generic drug industry (Ronald Reagan signed that one)
BUSINESS
September 24, 2010 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
The return of a classic drama and a new attempt at a family animated franchise will compete for the top spot at the box office this weekend, though neither is likely to be a huge hit. Twentieth Century Fox's "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps," a sequel to the 1987 classic that teams Shia LaBeouf with original star Michael Douglas, opens against Warner Bros.' "Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole," director Zack Snyder's animated feature adaptation of the fantasy book series for kids.
NEWS
June 27, 1990 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration said Tuesday that despite the possible demise of the northern spotted owl, logging may proceed as usual in the Northwest until a new task force can devise long-range plans to balance the needs of nature with those of production and profit. The decision runs against the recommendations of a blue-ribbon panel of government scientists, who had recommended putting 3 million additional acres of old-growth forests off-limits to loggers.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Can an airport be mistaken for the arctic tundra? Not by pilots, but certainly to snowy owls invading the Northeast and Midwest in record numbers this year. What has turned into a headache for airports may be a boon to birdwatchers traveling for the holidays who want to add this usually reclusive creature to their life lists. "We're experiencing what could be the largest-ever influx of Arctic snowy owls into the Northeast and the Great Lakes states," a statement from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology released Tuesday says.
NEWS
June 16, 1990
Environmentalists told senior advisers to President Bush on Friday that the timber industry has grossly exaggerated the economic impact of proposals to save the Northwest's northern spotted owl from extinction. The White House officials who heard the environmentalists' story Friday had heard from the timber industry the day before.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A Novato winery is the latest to try owls instead of toxic poisons to control rodents that eat grapevines. Four owl boxes are spread around Pacheco Ranch Winery's vineyards, and owners Herb and Debbie Rowland are welcoming any owls that want to move in. Alex Godbe, program director for Wildcare's Hungry Owl Project, said she and five volunteers already have put up boxes at 75 sites. Some owls found the shelters and moved in.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1990
I am a bird watcher and have been following the problems of the timber industry in the Northwest with considerable interest. Most of the defense for saving those magnificent old trees comes from the protection of habitat for a little bird, the northern spotted owl. It's my belief that the forests should also be saved for their own sake, their beauty and their serenity. I thank the federal appeals court for its stay of execution. LEILA N. McDERMOTT Granada Hills
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Can an airport be mistaken for the arctic tundra? Not by pilots, but certainly to snowy owls invading the Northeast and Midwest in record numbers this year. What has turned into a headache for airports may be a boon to birdwatchers traveling for the holidays who want to add this usually reclusive creature to their life lists. "We're experiencing what could be the largest-ever influx of Arctic snowy owls into the Northeast and the Great Lakes states," a statement from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology released Tuesday says.
NATIONAL
December 10, 2013 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - First terrapin turtles. Now snowy owls. Humans are not the only species flocking to airports this holiday season. At least five times in the last two weeks, airliners at John F. Kennedy, LaGuardia and Newark Liberty airports have been hit by the fluffy white owls, which airport and Audubon officials agree are migrating south in far higher numbers than normal. One was even spotted in Bermuda recently, said Glenn Phillips, executive director of New York City Audubon.
OPINION
December 3, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Proficiat Postaliosa! If Harry Potter commemorative stamps can cast a solvency spell on the U.S. Postal Service, that's some magic we can get behind. Tradition-bound philatelists should back off from their complaints. The stamps, depicting scenes from the movies based on J.K. Rowling's books , went on sale in late November despite vehement opposition from some serious stamp collectors, who objected that they were both un-American and crassly commercial. Michael Baadke, the editor of Linn's Stamp News, summarized the collectors' arguments when he wrote that Harry Potter postage was "dismissing significant established U.S. stamp traditions without explanation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
GROVELAND, Calif. - The Rim fire that scorched a huge swath of Sierra Nevada forests also severely altered the habitat that is home to several of California's rarest animals: the great gray owl, the Sierra Nevada red fox and the Pacific fisher. The fire burned 257,000 acres of High Sierra wilderness straddling the Stanislaus National Forest and Yosemite National Park that harbors a geographically isolated and genetically distinct clan of roughly 200 great gray owls. The blaze also came within 12 miles of 10 breeding pairs of the subspecies of red fox clinging to survival in the cold, steep slopes above the tree line, raising fears they could have been eaten by coyotes trying to escape the smoke and flames.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Standing on ridges miles away from the Rim fire, John Buckley has traced the path of the huge Sierra Nevada blaze by watching fire clouds billowing above the Stanislaus National Forest. The view has been sobering. As the Rim blaze burns its way into the record books, Buckley thinks it is roasting some of the last remaining old-growth stands in the Stanislaus forest, incinerating thousands of acres of young trees planted at a cost of millions of dollars after massive 1987 fires and destroying important nesting areas for California spotted owls and goshawks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Five juvenile burrowing owls flapped across a salt marsh at the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station on a recent weekday, matching the loops and curves of dragonflies and moths before snatching their prey midair. Soon, the owls will be feasting on larger prey, including lizards, rodents and birds. That could present a touchy problem for the base's 1,000-acre wildlife refuge, which is also home to a breeding colony of federally endangered least terns. There are four breeding pairs of burrowing owls left along the Southern California coast between Santa Barbara and Encinitas, and all of them nest at the Orange County base.
NATIONAL
July 23, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
SAN FRANCISCO - Federal wildlife officials have moved one step closer to their plan to play referee in a habitat supremacy contest that has pitted two species of owl against one another in the forests of the Pacific Northwest. On Tuesday, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released a final environmental review of an experiment planned in three states to see if killing barred owls will assist the northern spotted owls , which are threatened with extinction after a major loss of territory since the 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By Heather Havrilesky
When a friend gets rich and famous and moves to Paris, then prattles on about the nutty things that French dentists say, that's grounds for never speaking to that person again. When the friend in question is an imaginary friend and his name is David Sedaris, such indiscretions are not only forgiven but embraced wholeheartedly. If there's ever been an author who is consistently forgiven for his trespasses, it's David Sedaris. In "Let's Explore Diabetes With Owls," everyone's favorite imaginary friend has abandoned France for the English countryside, where his life of leisure is only occasionally interrupted by sojourns to China, Australia and Japan.
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