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July 4, 1989 | From United Press International
Oxford Energy Co. said it has received the final permits from Connecticut's environmental protection commissioner needed for the construction of a $100-million, tire-to-energy power plant. The company said the 30-megawatt plant will convert about 10 million tires a year into electricity for sale to Connecticut Light & Power, a Northeast Utilities subsidiary, under a long-term sales agreement.
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NEWS
April 1, 1990 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his relentless celebration of American folkways, Norman Rockwell transformed derelict automobile tires into little petunia beds and children's swings--testament to Yankee thrift and the creativity of ordinary folks who extracted their last nickel's worth. Sadly, nobody else has so deftly dispatched worn-out tires into a useful hereafter. Long a national nuisance, they are piling up across the country faster than ever.
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NEWS
April 1, 1990 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his relentless celebration of American folkways, Norman Rockwell transformed derelict automobile tires into little petunia beds and children's swings--testament to Yankee thrift and the creativity of ordinary folks who extracted their last nickel's worth. Sadly, nobody else has so deftly dispatched worn-out tires into a useful hereafter. Long a national nuisance, they are piling up across the country faster than ever.
BUSINESS
July 4, 1989 | From United Press International
Oxford Energy Co. said it has received the final permits from Connecticut's environmental protection commissioner needed for the construction of a $100-million, tire-to-energy power plant. The company said the 30-megawatt plant will convert about 10 million tires a year into electricity for sale to Connecticut Light & Power, a Northeast Utilities subsidiary, under a long-term sales agreement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1987
Regarding the picture of "Rubber Mountain" (Feb. 17): Tell Arch Ford, senior vice president of the Oxford Energy Co., to avoid contracting to produce electricity for 14,000 homes. That is, if he intends to burn tires at the rate of 500 a minute to produce the electricity. 1,440 minutes a day will require 720,000 tires. The 40 million tires he is pictured as standing on will last only 55 1/2 days. Then the 14,000 homes will go dark until an additional 263 million tires a year are found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1987
Reader Philip Rask from Newport Beach (Letters, Feb. 26) is exactly correct in his mathematical calculations, that if Oxford Energy burns tires at the rate of 500 per minute to produce the electricity at its new Modesto plant, the electricity would only last 55 1/2 days. Unfortunately, a typographical error appeared in the news article, which created a lot of unnecessary work for Rask. Our $41.5-million plant, the first plant in the United States that will burn whole tires to generate energy will be burning 50 tires per minute to create steam for a turbine to provide power for 14,000 homes--not 500 tires per minute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1995 | FRANK MANNING
The city of Calabasas' tire recycling efforts have reached a point where the rubber meets the road--in a manner of speaking. The city has applied for a $13,750 state grant to cover the cost of converting 16,800 tires stored at the Calabasas Landfill into rubberized asphalt for use on local streets. The money would go toward transporting the tires to a facility in Fontana, where they would be ground up and turned into asphalt, said Calabasas City Manager Charles Cate.
NEWS
December 29, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
The owners of the world's largest tire dump were accused Monday by Atty. Gen. John K. Van de Kamp of creating a public nuisance that could erupt into a huge inferno. Van de Kamp said the charges in Stanislaus County Superior Court against Edward and Mary Etta Filbin cite mosquito breeding as well as the potential fire danger.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | RODNEY ANGOVE, Associated Press
The little factory south of town that converts rice wastes to electricity is a sweet deal for everyone. It relieves 21 rice mills of the expensive landfill disposal of rice hulls, and spares residents of the Sacramento Valley from the noxious smoke of rice straw burning in the fields. The Pacific Gas & Electric Co. gets power without the financial and environmental encumbrances. Electricity users may turn on their toasters without visions of oil sheiks or leaking tankers. Even the makers of concrete, ceramics, glass and computer chips welcome the burning rice's ash, which is also used to oxidize and solidify toxic waste spills.
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